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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

A Horse Powered Round Bale Unroller

A Horse Powered Round Bale Unroller

A Horse Powered Round Bale Unroller

by Tony McQuail of Lucknow, ON

The reason for doing this winter fencing was that we wanted to try feeding our cattle outside for the winter to increase the nutrients available to this field in the spring and reduce the amount of manure we would have to deal with in the barn. To this end the plan was to feed hay in a systematic way on top of the snow moving across the field so that every area would receive a coating of manure dropped while the cattle were feeding and any waste hay materials. Our friends on the prairies lay out a grid pattern of large round or square bales before snow in the fall and then use their portable electric fencing to meter it out. We had experimented with leaving round bales outside and felt that in our more humid climate it was better to store bales under cover until they were to be fed. Our plan was to feed them daily or every other day and let the positioning of them distribute the fertility and the timing meter them out.

We had experimented with unrolling the bales the year before and had decided to make a device that would let us move them with the horses and then unroll them. I used square tubing to make a simple frame with two arms attached to a cross piece which connected to a tongue. Small diagonal braces made the arrangement rigid and the arms had a right angle piece of square tubing on their ends which allowed a pin to be driven into the middle of the round bale from each side. I have 4 x 4 bales and the pins penetrate about a foot. The pins act like an axle allowing the bale to roll. I first tried rolling the bale out to where I wanted to feed it. It worked well for distances under 500 meters but the axle “bearing” in the hay could get pretty sloppy when going a long way.

A Horse Powered Round Bale Unroller

I made up a sleigh that goes under the bale for transportation and is held to the frame by two chains and a grab hook. I tie some bale twine to a link on each chain the same distance from the sleigh. This becomes my guide when I’m hooking the sleigh to the unroller. I take the chain with the hook over the cross piece of the roller around the tongue and back over the cross piece – I leave it slack and then hook the other chain in the lock hook so the two twines are at the same level. With the grab hook hanging down from the frame, and the other chain hung through it, gravity keeps the chains hooked until tension takes over. When I start off the chain tightens and the sleigh keeps the bale from rolling. With this system I can take the twines off the bale in the shelter of the pile or shed where the bales are stored, slide the bales out to where I want to unroll it, back the horses up to get some slack on the chains to unhook them and then walk on unrolling a 4 foot wide strip of hay until I get down to the small core of the bale. Then I pull the pins and store them in the side arms of the unroller (they fit nicely in the square tubing if you weld it so the side arms are open at the top.

I then haul the frame back to the sled and hook it back on. After a couple of times riding back on the sled I realized it would be a lot better to have it securely attached to the unroller frame rather than sliding forward and backward. I welded a couple of short pieces of square tubing to a 4 foot long piece of angle iron which I bolted to the front of the sled. Now when I get back to the empty sled I pull the two pins out of the arms and put them through the side brackets of the unroller and the square tubing at the front of the sled. I drilled a hole in each pin near the point and have some heavy spring pins which I push through the holes to lock the pins in position. I tied the two pins together with bale twine so I can kick them out and not lose them in the snow. It also keeps them together in my coverall’s pocket when I’m riding out with the bale. I flip the chains up onto the sled so they don’t drag underneath it.

Riding back on the rigidly attached sled is a lot more secure and has the added advantage that I can back the sled up to the next bale and get it in position with the horses rather than having to drag it around by hand. Once it is in position I kick out the spring clips, pull out the side pins and roll the next bale onto the sled. I back the horses up a little and lift the side arms so I can push the pins into the center of the bale on each side. I attach the chains to the unroller and then cut and pull the strings off the bale and I’m ready to feed my next bale.

A Horse Powered Round Bale Unroller

We piled our bales at the edge of the field in a long row with a 6 bale cross section — 3 bales on the bottom, then two then one. We put the lower bales on skids to keep them off the ground. We covered it with a tarp, which kept most of the snow off, but did let the moisture and snow freeze to the two bottom bales on the outside. After a few times breaking bales loose with human powered digging bars we decided to use the horses. We used a heavy nylon rope with a big loop in it and a clevis at the end. We put the loop around the bale pushing the rope down behind the back of the bale and the loops up the side. I then back the unroller and sled up to the pile and use a light logging chain with a lock hook to attach to the clevis. I attach the grab hook to the chain that is dangling from my logging double tree which is attached to the bale unroller chain hitch with its grab hook.

I then walk away from the pile, the slack is taken up and the bale is popped off the pile or broken loose from the other bales or the skids that they sometimes freeze to. We can then position the bale onto the sled and hook up the unroller. If both Fran and I go out one of us works on positioning the rope on the next bale while the other feeds this one.

We have also used the sled and unroller to move hay when we are going to be away for an extended period of time and want to set the bales up in a grid which our neighbor can meter out with electric fencing. We set out the number of bales that would be fed for the week or ten days we will be away and then surround them with electric fencing. Our neighbor can then feed them out by shifting the fence. We have him feed two days worth at a time so that every animal no matter how dominant can get a belly full of hay and then hopefully the hay will get mostly cleaned up on day two. When we roll out the bales dominance isn’t such a concern because the feeding area is large but if the bales are still rolled up the feeding area is smaller and it is good to have several bales for them to work on and for the dominant cows to have full bellies while there is still lots of hay left for the second day.

A Horse Powered Round Bale Unroller

A Versatile Chain Hitch for a Regular or Hook Clevis for the Logging Sleigh

One of the challenges when going to the bush in the winter was having to take a second double tree. My logging double tree is equipped with a swivel and a chain hook with a ring on it so I can pick it up easily to hook to a chain around a log. It took extra time and wasn’t really convenient to take the clevis and hook off the logging double tree so it could go on the sleigh — then when I got to the bush having to disconnect it from the sleigh and put the hook and clevis back on. I tended to use two double trees but I still had to disconnect the horses from the sleigh.

A Horse Powered Round Bale Unroller

I decided to solve the problem by replacing my double tree strap with a chain with a flat piece of steel welded to the end of it — a hole the diameter of the double tree pin was drilled through the steel and the chain was welded to a short piece of 2 inch square tubing in such a way that the chain allows the hole in the flat piece to line up with the hole in the tongue. This way a regular double tree can be used on the sleigh with a pin or I can use the logging double tree hooked to the chain. When I get to the bush I just unhook from the chain and walk the horses off the tongue and I’m ready to skid logs. When I’m done I just step the horses over the tongue – put it through the neck yoke back them up and catch the chain with the hook and I’m ready to head back to the barn.

A Horse Powered Round Bale Unroller

I also set up my bale unroller with a chain and only use the logging double tree with it. We stored the big round bales under a tarp back at the bush so we ride back to them with the sleigh and then switch the double tree onto the bale unroller. We loop a heavy piece of rope around a bale and then flip it out of the stack with the horses pulling on it. I also made a little sled which goes under the bale which allows me to take it to where I want to feed it. So after we get the bale off the pile we roll it on to the sled making sure that the hay is oriented to unroll. To move the bale the arms of the unroller are positioned on either side in the centre of the bale and then 2 foot long pins are pushed in from either side. There are two chains on the front of the sled which are hooked around the cross bar of the unroller. We cut and remove the bale twine from the bale. When the horses step forward the bale starts to roll off the sled until the chains get tight at which point the sled and bale move together and we head off to where I want waste hay, manure and urine to boost the fertility. When I get to where I want to start unrolling I back the horses to slack off the sled chains, unhook them and then walk forward unrolling the bale. Initially, I tried riding the sled back to the pile with only the chains holding it to the unroller — this was not very pleasant as it would slide up on the horses going down hill and was not very secure. So I built a bracket on the front of the sled out of a 4 foot length of angle iron and 2 short pieces of 1.5 inch square tubing which lets me use the bale pins to securely anchor the sled to the unroller. I drilled a hole in the hay pin so I can use a spring pin to lock it in place. This makes for a much nicer ride back to the hay pile and also means that it is rigid so I can turn it around and back it up to the pile. I use the hook from the chain to the bale rope to the unroller chain and then can pop the next bale off the pile without unhooking the sled — I position the bale, back the sled up to it and then pull the pins and move the arms up to the bale center and start the process over again.

Spotlight On: Livestock

Raising Chickens on the Schekel Farm

Raising Chickens on the Scheckel Farm

by:
from issue:

We kept our eye on this rooster. He was high entertainment for 3 boys and 3 younger sisters on that farm. We didn’t give him a name, just called him “Rooster,” and Rooster ruled. Other roosters moved out of his way. Hens cowered when Rooster appeared. My dog Browser wouldn’t go near Rooster. Rooster was invincible. Or so he thought.

Rabbits

Rabbits

by:
from issue:

The domestic rabbit has the potential to become one of the world’s major sources of meat protein. As human populations continue to put pressure on the resources of the food providers, the farmers, the rabbit is likely to begin to interest, not only the farmer, but the family interested in providing food for it’s table. They convert forage more efficiently than do ruminants, such as cattle and sheep. In fact, rabbits can produce five times the amount of meat from a given amount of alfalfa as do beef cattle.

Horseshoeing Part 6B

Horseshoeing Part 6B

Wounds of the velvety tissue of the sole or of the podophyllous tissue of the wall, caused by nails which have been driven into the hoof for the purpose of fastening the shoe, are usually termed “nailing.” We distinguish direct and indirect nailing; the former is noticed immediately, the latter later.

Work Horse Handbook

The Work Horse Handbook

The decision to depend on horses or mules in harness for farm work, logging, or highway work is an important one and should not be taken lightly. Aside from romantic notions of involvement in a picturesque scene, most of the considerations are serious.

Livestock and Predators No Easy Answers

Livestock and Predators: No Easy Answers

by:
from issue:

Since we’ve raised sheep commercially, we’ve been committed to trying to live with the predators in our environment. Over the years, we’ve lost just a handful of sheep — several to coyotes, at least one each to mountain lions and rattlesnakes, and four in one night to a neighbor’s dog. Mostly, though, our commitment to nonlethal predator protection tools has worked. A combination of electric fencing, livestock guardian dogs, sheep selection and grazing management has allowed us to co-exist with the predators in our environment.

The Big Hitch

The Big Hitch

In 1925 Slim Moorehouse drove a hitch of 36 Percheron Horses pulling 10 grain wagons loaded with 1477 bushesl of wheat through the Calgary Stampede Parade. It is out intention to honor a man who was a great horseman and a world record holder. The hitch, horses and wagons, was 350 feet in length and he was the only driver.

Mule Powered Wrecker Service

Mule Drawn Wrecker Service

This will only add fuel to those late night discoursians about the relative merits of horses over mules or viciversy. Is the horse the smarter one for hitching a ride or is the mule the smarter one for recognizing the political opportunity which this all represents? In any event these boys know what they are doing, or should, so don’t try this at home without horse tranquilizers. Remember that politics is a luke warm bowl of thin soup.

Sheep A Logical Choice

Sheep: A Logical Choice

by:
from issue:

Sheep have numerous uses on a smallholding. They are excellent grazers and are ideal at revitalizing old pastures as well as an excellent follower of the cows in a rotational grazing system. Cropping the grass at 2-3 inches that the cows have left at 8 inches encourages new growth in the spring. Their manure is usually in pellet form and is spread throughout a pasture as they graze. A sheep shares a ton a year of fertilizer with the earth.

Logging with Oxen in New Hampshire

Logging with Oxen in New Hampshire

by:
from issue:

I hear time and time again at the outset of each workshop, “I don’t know anything about working oxen.” And I say, “There is no more fun than being a beginner.” Myself and the staff get great pleasure in sharing our knowledge of working steers and oxen. For as long as there are those interested in working cattle, the men I mentioned early in this article will not be forgotten. I believe there will always be cattle worked on small farms and in the woods.

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

by: ,
from issue:

Missouri Sunlit Hog House: This is an east and west type of house lighted by windows in the south roof. A single stack ventilation system with distributed inlets provides ventilation. Pen partitions may be of wood or metal. This plan takes the place of the original Missouri sunlit house since many farmers had difficulty in building it.

Ask A Teamster Hauling Horses

Ask A Teamster: Hauling Horses

For a claustrophobic animal like the horse, being confined to a small box while speeding down the highway at 60 miles per hour is a mighty unnatural experience. Luckily, equines are adaptable animals and are likely to arrive in good condition – if – you make preparations beforehand and take some precautions. Here are some tips to help your horse stay healthy, safe, and comfortable while traveling.

Harnessing the Future

Harnessing the Future

by:
from issue:

En route to a remote pasture where the Belgian draft horses, Prince and Tom, are grazing, we survey the vast green landscape, a fine mist hovering in distant low lying areas. We are enveloped in a profusion of sweet, earthy balance. Interns and other workers start their chores; one pauses to check his smart phone. Scattered about are many animal-powered rustic implements. This rich and agriculturally diverse, peaceful place is steeped in contrasts: modern and ancient.

How Big Should a Draft Horse Be

How Big Should A Draft Horse Be?

from issue:

As evidenced by our letters and the frequent comments of contributors to this magazine, the question of size in draft horses is a hot issue. I suppose we’d all like to think that it’s a contemporary subject, one which did not trouble people back when horses were the norm. The BREEDER’S GAZETTE gathered the opinions of the most respected Draft horsemen of the 1910’s on the subject of how big a draft horse should be and we’ve reprinted them here. As you can see the subject has provided controversy for a long time and I’m sure it will continue.

Methods of Feeding Turkeys

Methods of Feeding Turkeys

In a survey made before starting this experimental work, it was found that there was considerable confusion in the minds of many poultrymen as to the relative efficiency between the mash and pellet methods of feeding. A review of the literature on turkey nutrition and methods of feeding failed to disclose any studies which would be of assistance in answering this question. As a result, an experimental program was outlined to investigate several methods of feeding growing turkeys.

Ask A Teamster Driving

Ask A Teamster: Driving

I have been questioned (even criticized) about my slow, gentle, repetitious approach “taking too much time” and all the little steps being unnecessary when one can simply “hitch ‘em tied back to a well-broke horse they can’t drag around, and just let ‘em figure it out on their own.” I try to give horses the same consideration I would like if someone was teaching me how to do something new and strange.

Haying With Horses

Hitching Horses To A Mower

When hitching to the mower, first make sure it’s on level ground and out of gear. The cutter bar should be fastened up in the vertical or carrier position. This is for safety of all people in attendance during hitching.

Boer Goats

Boer Goats

by:
from issue:

The introduction of the Boer Goat has stirred up a lot of interest in all sectors of agriculture. The demand for goat meat exceeds the supply; goat meat is the most consumed meat in the world. One of the main points about South African Boer Goats is that out of all meat goat breeds the Boer is the top meat producer whereas in the cattle business you have over 100 breeds of beef cattle that all compete for the beef dollar.

New York Organic Grazing Dairy

New York Organic Grazing Dairy

by:
from issue:

Our farm, here in the center of New York State, consists of 101 acres, about 90 in grass, the rest some woods and swamp. It is inhabited by forty-six jersey cows, twelve breeding ace heifers, one bull, and because it is calving season — an increasing number of calves. Also, four Belgian mares and a couple of buggy horses. Last, and possibly least — the farmer, farmer’s wife, and five grown children.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT