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American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm
American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm

Doug’s cattle are friendly and easy to approach, and these cows have produced milk and calves for over a decade.

American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm

by Drew Conroy of Berwick, ME

Just below the Canadian border in Northern Vermont is the Flack Family Farm. On a sunny early September day I met Doug Flack at his biodynamic and organic farm, just South of Enosburg Falls. Doug has been farming in Vermont since 1976.

For years Doug has assisted others with fencing and grazing techniques for livestock, which go back to his days working in New Zealand. He is also known for being active in numerous organizations related to agriculture in Vermont, hosting interns, and encouraging others to embrace organic and biodynamic techniques on their farms.

Doug greeted me warmly and sat me down for a hearty lunch, before we talked about the cattle and the farm. The meal could not have been more appropriate. It consisted of a Devon beef burger (grass fed), a chunk of Devon cheese, butter on the homemade bread again made from Devon milk, and finally other products from the farm including Sauerkraut grown and fermented on the farm, as well as potatoes and various greens and the only thing not grown on the farm was millet.

The meal was a great way to discuss the many virtues of Devon Cattle. Doug and I spoke at length about subjects ranging from locally grown food, his passion for fermented foods. I was there to talk about Devon Cattle and our discussion about cattle led to tales of both of our travels and work in Africa spanning decades. This included how pastoralists manage their herds and grasslands, and led full circle back to his grazing philosophy and a peek at his daughter Sarah’s upcoming book on grazing management to be published by Chelsea Green Publishing.

American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm

Steers are entirely grass fed, never get a taste of grain in their life. It takes three grazing seasons to get them to market size he desires, and he sells the meat in 50 lb. boxes.

Doug admits over the years, the fermentation vegetable products on the farm have really taken off, and seem to take more of his time than other enterprises on the farm. Between running workshops at the farm, teaching people about fermenting foods at places like nearby Sterling College, and Green Mountain College, while also selling 14 tons of products in 30 Vermont Food Coops, small stores and restaurants, it has become a fast growing niche for the farm, and generate far more income than the cattle.

I had visited Doug about ten years earlier, and was frankly quite impressed with the milk production capacity and conformation related to heavy milking that his American Milking Devon cows displayed. His cattle were also some of the more friendly cattle I had interacted with, due in part to his regular handling and milking.

In fact, at the time, I was exploring what bulls farmers had that the American Milking Devon Cattle Association might support in drawing their semen. I knew if I was going to write about Devon cattle, I had to revisit the farm.

Doug began his story with American Milking Devons, saying, “We have had them about 15-16 years. The first ones came from John Wheelock in Colchester, Vermont, including Jewel, whose 15 year old daughter he still has. Other stock came from Trauger Groh in Wilton, NH, where we got a few, including some that have been really good milkers. Finally, we also got two beautiful cows from Dan Holmes when he was at the Meeting House School in New Hampshire.” 1

1) Dan Holmes has since moved to Peterborough, NH where he was selling raw milk, cheese, beef, from his small dairy herd at Sunnyfield Farm a non-profit farm. The herd still includes some American Milking Devons.

During September 2015 Doug had 5 cows, 5 heifer calves, 2 bulls (both purchased to bring in new genetics) and a number of steers from previous calving seasons. His cattle are entirely grass fed, and he is a firm believer that the Devon cattle with their aggressive grazing and adaptability do this very well. He uses management intensive grazing and seasonally milks the herd. “The Devons are super hardy, comfortable in the cold, and adapt well to warmer temperatures as well. Farmers tend to ignore the animals like the Devon that are so well adapted to our environment. I believe we do this at our own peril,” Doug says, referring to the climate change we are facing in the world right now.

Doug admits, “I love the Devons and every product they produce. They are the prime fertility drivers on the farm, but really are sort of break even economically by themselves.” They convert the perennial cool season grasses and legumes that grow so well in this region, to manure that is composted and added to the fields where he grows cabbages, and other cold season crops to ferment. The fermentation products we produce generate more money on the farm than the cattle.

American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm

Doug has a self serve Farm Store, where customers bring their own container for the purchase of raw milk.

Doug says, “we do make cheese and butter, but for home consumption only, as Vermont law prevents us from selling processed milk products unless we build an expensive licensed facility. However, the demand for raw milk is huge. I have been selling raw milk for 15 years, people come to the farm with their own container and we fill it.”

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Spotlight On: How-To & Plans

Horsedrawn Plows and Plowing

Setting Up A Walking Plow

Here is a peek into the pages of Horsedrawn Plows and Plowing, written by SFJ editor and publisher Lynn R. Miller.

Horse Powered Snow Fencing and Sleigh Fencing

Horse Powered Snow Fencing and Sleigh Fencing

by:
from issue:

We were planning on having our cattle out in a sheltered field for the winter but a busy fall and early snows meant our usual fencing tool was going to be ineffective. Through the grazing season we use a reel barrow which allows us to carry posts and pay out or take in wire with a wheel barrow like device which works really well. But not on snow. This was the motivation for turning our sleigh into a “snow fencer” or a “sleigh barrow”.

Horseshoeing Part 2C

Horseshoeing Part 2C

The wear of the shoe is caused much less by the weight of the animal’s body than by the rubbing which takes place between the shoe and the earth whenever the foot is placed to the ground and lifted. The wear of the shoe which occurs when the foot is placed on the ground is termed “grounding wear,” and that which occurs while the foot is being lifted from the ground is termed “swinging-off wear.” When a horse travels normally, both kinds of wear are nearly alike, but are very distinct when the paces are abnormal, especially when there is faulty direction of the limbs.

The Woodfired Bottom-heated Greenhouse Bench

Cultivating Questions: The Woodfired Bottom-heated Greenhouse Bench

It took several incarnations to come up with a satisfactory design for the bottom heated greenhouse bench. In the final version we used two 55 gallon drums welded end-to-end for the firebox and a salvaged piece of 12” stainless steel chimney for the horizontal flue. We learned the hard way that a large firebox and flue are necessary to dissipate the intense heat into the surrounding air chamber and to minimize heat stress on these components.

Basil Scarberrys Ground-Drive Forecart

Basil Scarberry’s Ground-Drive Forecart

by:
from issue:

I used an ’84 Chevrolet S-10 rear end to build my forecart, turn it over to get right rotation, used master cylinder off buggy and 2” Reese hitch, extend hitch out to use P.T.O. The cart is especially useful for tedding hay. However, its uses are virtually unlimited. We use it for hauling firewood on a trailer, for pulling a disc and peg tooth harrow, for hauling baled hay on an 8’ x 16’ hay wagon, and just for a jaunt about the farm and community.

The Farm & Bakery Wagon

The Farm & Bakery Wagon

by:
from issue:

The first step was to decide on an appropriate chassis, or “running gear.” Eventually I chose to go with the real deal, a wooden-wheeled gear with leaf springs rather than pneumatic tires. Wooden wheels last forever with care and are functional and look the part. I bought an antique delivery wagon that had been left outdoors as an ornament. I was able to reuse some of the wheels and wooden parts of the running gear.

"Work Horse Handbook, 2nd Edition" by Lynn Miller

Draft Collars and How To Size Them

It is difficult to accurately measure a horse’s neck without fitting. In other words, there are so many variables involved in the shape and size of a horse’s neck that the only accurate and easy way to size the neck is to use several collars and put them on one at a time until fitting is found.

Barn Door Plans

Barn Door Plans

Good barn doors, ones that will last a lifetime of opening, sliding and swinging in the wind, require careful design and construction. In 1946 the Starline Co., a barn building firm from the midwestern US, compiled a book of barn plans. These two diagrams were in that book and presented excellent information.

How To Prune a Formal Hedge

How To Prune A Formal Hedge

This guide to hedge-trimming comes from The Pruning Answer Book by Lewis Hill and Penelope O’Sullivan. Q: What’s the correct way to shear a formal hedge? A: The amount of shearing depends upon the specific plant and whether the hedge is formal or informal. You’ll need to trim an informal hedge only once or twice a year, although more vigorous growers, such as privet and ninebark, may need additional clippings.

Multiple Hitching with One Set of Lines

Multiple Hitching with One Set of Lines

by:
from issue:

A great deal of interest has been shown the last several years in using multiple hitches in horse farming, especially in spring fieldwork. The question often asked is how to keep it simple and easy in driving and assembling the hitch as far as lines are concerned. We demonstrated our method at the Horse Progress Days at Mt. Hope, Ohio in 2003 and have been asked numerous times how we drove four, six and eight-horse hitches using only two lines.

Fencing for Horses

Fencing for Horses

by:
from issue:

The first wire we tried was a small gauge steel wire which was not terribly satisfactory with horses. Half the time they wouldn’t see it and would charge on through. And the other half of the time they would remember getting shocked by something they hadn’t seen there and would refuse to come through when we were standing there with gate wide open. We realized that visibility was an important consideration when working with horses.

Work Horse Handbook

Grooming Work Horses

The serviceability of the work horse may be increased or decreased according to the care which is bestowed upon him. If he is groomed in a perfunctory fashion his efficiency as an animal motor is lessened. On the other hand, if he is well groomed he is snappier and fresher in appearance and is constantly up on the bit.

Livestock Guardians

Introducing Your Guard Dog To New Livestock And Other Dogs

When you introduce new animals to an established herd or flock, you should observe your dog’s reactions and behavior for a few days. Since he will be curious anyway, it is a good idea to introduce him to the new animals while he is leashed or to place the new animals in a nearby area.

Sack Sewing with Wayne Ryan

Sack Sewing with Wayne Ryan

by:
from issue:

Watching Wayne’s sure hands it was easy for me to forget that this is a 91 year old man. There was strength, economy, elegance and thrift in his every stroke.

Box Jaw Tongs & the Cow Poop Theory of Blacksmithing

Box Jaw Tongs & the Cow Poop Theory of Blacksmithing

by:
from issue:

Making a pair of tongs was a milestone for a lot of blacksmiths. In times gone past a Journeyman Smith meant just that, a smith that went upon a journey to learn more skills before taking a masters test. When the smith appeared at the door of a prospective employer, he/she would be required to demonstrate their skills. A yard stick for this was to make a pair of tongs.

Soil, Vegetation, and Acidity

From Dusty Shelves: Audels Gardeners and Growers Guide teaches us about soil acidity.

Horseshoeing Part 2B

Horseshoeing Part 2B

If we observe horses moving unrestrained over level ground, we will notice differences in the carriage of the feet. Many deviations in the line of flight of hoofs and in the manner in which they are set to the ground occur; for example, horses heavily burdened or pulling heavy loads, and, therefore, not having free use of their limbs, project their limbs irregularly and meet the ground first with the toe; however, careful observation will detect the presence of one or the other of these lines of flight of the foot.