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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PST

Ask A Teamster Round Pen Training

Ask A Teamster: Round Pen Training

by Dr. Doug Hammill D.V.M. of Montana

Hi Doc Hammill,

We bought a copy of your latest video on teaching horses to drive – and once again (we have your fundamentals 1-4) you have done a beautiful job. It has made an ENORMOUS difference in getting our horses to cooperate with us. I’m wondering if you might answer a couple of questions for me.

Sometimes it almost seems like the horses are getting bored with the repetition of some of the round pen work (i.e. following one around in the round pen). Do you try to alter the routine when this occurs – or is it important that the horse does exactly as you want regardless of what activity is occurring?

Since we are about the only one in the area with draft horses, we are concerned about the farrier that we get to trim the horses’ feet. As you have pointed out in your fundamentals videos, it is important that the farrier does not trim the back too short (and the front of the hoof too long). Since we are quite ignorant on this matter, we are wondering if you plan to do a video that might go into great length on this subject? If not, would you have any recom- mendations on books, videos, etc. that might give us a better idea of how this should be done correctly (i.e., good photos, hoof comparisons, etc.)?

Thanks so much,

Susan

Dear Susan,

Thank you for your kind words. It has always been a gift to me to be able to share my learning with good people and their horses.

Round Pen Training:

There is definitely a fine line between driving a horse away in the round pen to the point of boredom from repetition without variation, and driving them away to just the right point before asking them to stop, turn towards you and come to you, etc.. Likewise, when we ask them to follow us, stop and stay with us, or almost anything else, it can get to be too routine and not interesting enough to hold their attention. It’s our job to read the horse and make a change or variation BEFORE they lose interest.

If we all had the experience and skill of masters of the round pen like Monty Roberts, and other world class trainers, the results and successes would come as rapidly, solidly, and predictably for us as they do for them. However, we each work, practice, and learn at our own level. Fortunately, horses are basically cooperative, forgiving animals, particularly if we don’t lose our patience with them and become loud, harsh, too forceful, or hurt them.

When we ask a horse to follow us in the round pen we can help him succeed by varying things a bit – changing direction and speed frequently, stopping periodically to reward him with a rub (“a rub” or two, not 100), picking up a foot, playing with his tail/ears/mouth, etc. In other words, working at desensitizing or sensitizing him by simulating things he will experience in the future (trimming and shoeing, crupper, bridle over the ears, bit, etc.). There are endless training opportunities that we can constantly blend into all of our time with them – whether in the round pen or just doing our routine daily care and interactions with them. Be consistent in the principles with which you work with them and how you treat them, but vary what you ask of them and what you ask them to accept – and the locations in which you do so (once their progress and the time is right).

We gain control over the horse’s mind by controlling his motion/movement/feet. We also need to introduce variations into this technique to avoid lack of proper response and boredom in the horse. Try varying (controlling) the speed that you ask the horse to travel around the pen. Put extra pressure on and push him faster when his attention wanders, he shows resentful or resistant expressions, tries to make decisions on his own, etc. Look for opportunities to ease up and slow him down a bit when he gives you his undivided attention, begins to relax, and/or show signs of submission (licking and chewing, head down, smaller circles around you, etc.). But don’t wait too long at this easier pace to either ask him to stop and hook up with you if his behavior warrants it, or push him on again if his attention wanders – timing is critical. Try asking him to change directions BEFORE circling one way becomes too much of a routine. If the horse seems content to just keep going around the pen after a half dozen revolutions or so, you are probably not putting enough pressure on to get him to seek (ask for) something different that he will be more comfortable with. At some point, it may help to put pressure on by getting the horse to change directions repeatedly for a time. Just as you turn him and he thinks he can enjoy going the other way, you interfere with his expectations and turn him back, then back again, etc. This emphasizes that you are in control. Sometimes, for greater effect, I use just half the round pen for this, making him turn back repeatedly after only 1/2 a revolution. These variations in technique tend to emphasize to the horse that you can truly control his movement, speed, and direction – that you are the leader and the sooner he accepts it the sooner he can enjoy comfort with you again. However, be careful not to do intense actions like this for too long.

Sometimes a horse will repeatedly show willingness to bend its head toward you (ask), and then, when you ask/consent – she will stop, turn towards you, and maybe even come to you – but then does not accept, or follow through with, what you ask next. To me this is a sign that she is willing only up to a point, but not serious enough to accept your leadership completely. When this happens they usually respond to being pushed harder and controlled more intensely.

To quote some advice I once received from esteemed horseman and educator, Dr. Robert M. Miller, “You need to really study what Monty does. He causes flight and doesn’t let up until the colt is pleading. Then he abruptly changes his demeanor and – presto – the colt gratefully accepts his leadership. Most clinicians change their demeanor too soon. Just as soon as the colt shows any subordination. It doesn’t matter. The end result is the same. Just as good. But Monty does it in a fraction of the time because he can really understand the horse’s language.”

Horses vary individually in their willingness to accept domination (leadership) from other horses and from us. Some resist it far more than others. With this taken into account, I always feel that the response I get from a horse is directly proportionate to how well I am communicating and working with them. The better my timing, speed, direction, distance, posture, gestures, eye and body movements, etc., etc., etc.. – the better and faster they respond within the boundaries of their individual natures.

Long ago I subscribed to the common belief that it’s “important that the horse does exactly as you want regardless of what activity is occurring.” However, master horsemen throughout history have known that success comes from looking for and rewarding the small efforts the horse makes to respond and cooperate – then, gradually reinforcing and piecing them together to eventually get to the larger piece of what you want. We need to recognize and reward horses for the first, slightest sign that they are trying. Rewarding willingness to try will encourage trying again. Sometimes, I even change what I am asking from what I originally asked or hoped for, to something I notice the horse is offering, or may be more capable of accepting. Rather than push for something I might not get, I choose to accept a different but positive success.

Hoof Care:

Perhaps the greatest advancement in hoof care and soundness for horses in decades has come about relatively recently because of lifelong study, research, and development conducted by master farrier, Gene Ovnicek. Gene is now known and respected internationally for his revolutionary “Natural Balance Hoof Care (trimming and shoeing) and Equine Digital Support System.” He has a variety of excellent publications and videos which I recommend unconditionally. Using Natural Balance trimming and shoeing on our horses is the greatest single thing we can introduce for long term health and well being of their feet, and for long term soundness. If your farrier is not familiar with, trained in, and using Natural Balance trimming and shoeing on your horses, by all means get him to do so, find one who is, or learn and use it yourself. Ironically, Gene and I worked together as young, green farrier and veterinarian respectively in the Flathead Valley of Montana many, many years ago.

For more information:

Round Pen Considerations:

Just as with any other horse equipment, methods, or techniques, the round pen, and the techniques used in it, can be employed in a kind and gentle, appropriate way (without harshness, excessive force, and pain), or in an harsh, rough, inappropriate way (by today’s standards). And, of course, what constitutes harshness, excessive force, and appropriate or inappropriate methods in the mind of certain horsemen and horsewomen differs from that of others – we all have to make our personal choice on that. Both the mildest bit or the harshest bit can be kind, effective, and painless in the hands of a true and caring expert, or either can be an instrument of torture in the hands of the insensitive or unskilled – it’s the same with halters, whips, round pens, etc.

I suggest that you study and learn from as many teachers as you can – but not without running what they offer through the filter of your own consciousness and principles. Strive to eventually become as good as those who represent your ideals, and reject the ones you find unpalatable. Remember, there are many successful ways of working with horses. Select and employ the bits and pieces that work for you as you learn, practice, and progress. Be ready and willing to shed some old practices and replace them with better ones as you move up the ladder of horsemanship.

Don Hill and I have been working on our first horse gentling and round pen training videos for about two years now. Our hope is to finish filming this August (2006) and have them available in the fall. In addition, I now do gentling/round pen training workshops with mustang horses here in Montana.

Doc Hammill D.V.M.

Doc lives in Montana and helps people learn about horses through his writing, workshops, demonstrations, and horsemanship video series. www.DocHammill.com

Spotlight On: Equipment & Facilities

Portable Poultry

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An important feature of the range shelter described in this circular is that it is portable. Two men by inserting 2x4s through the holes located just below the roost supports and next to the center uprights can easily pick up and move it from one location to another. Frequent moving of the shelter prevents excessive accumulation of droppings in its vicinity which are a menace to the health of the birds. Better use will be made by the birds of the natural green feed produced on the range if the houses are moved often.

Farm Drum 28 Eds Wester Star Custom Forecart

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Lynn Miller and Ed Joseph examine a custom horse-drawn Forecart built by Ed’s company, Western Star Implement Co.

Multi-Purpose Tool Carrier Equi Idea Multi-V

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Building on the experiences with a tool carrier named Multi, consisting of a reversible plow interchangeable with a 5-tine cultivator, the Italian horse drawn equipment manufacturer EQUI IDEA launched in 2012 a new multi-purpose tool carrier named Multi-V. The “V” in its name refers to the first field of use, organic vineyards of Northern Italy. Later on, by designing more tools, other applications were successfully added, such as vegetable gardens and tree nurseries.

McD Lime Spreader

Parts lists and illustrations are included in this comprehensive overview

400 Hen Laying House

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by: ,
from issue:

One of the hardest problems in successful poultry keeping is to maintain the vigor and health of the flock. Housing has particular bearing on this problem. If the laying-house is poorly lighted, has insufficient ventilation, or is overcrowded, the health of the fowls will be affected. The purpose of housing is to increase productiveness. In order to accomplish this the fowls must be comfortable.

Fjordworks Plowing the Market Garden

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In a horse-powered market garden in the 1- to 10-acre range the moldboard plow can still serve us very well as one valuable component within a whole tool kit of tillage methods. In the market garden the plow is used principally to turn in crop residue or cover crops with the intention of preparing the ground to sow new seeds. In these instances, the plow is often the most effective tool the horse-powered farmer has on hand for beginning the process of creating a fine seed bed.

McCormick-Deering All Steel Corn Sheller

McCormick-Deering All-Steel Corn Sheller

from issue:

To obtain the best results in shelling, the machine should be run so that the crank makes about forty-five (45) revolutions per minute or the pulley shaft one hundred and seventy-five (175) revolutions per minute. When driving with belt be sure that this speed is maintained, as any speed in excess of this will have a tendency to cause the shelled corn to pass out with the cobs. The ears should be fed into the sheller point first.

Fjordworks Plowing the Market Garden Part 2

Fjordworks: Plowing the Market Garden Part 2

Within the context of the market garden, the principal aim for utilizing the moldboard is to initiate the process of creating a friable zone for the root systems of direct-seeded or transplanted cash crops to establish themselves in, where they will have sufficient access to all the plant nutrients, air, and moisture they require to bear successful fruits. To this end, it is critical for good plant growth to render the soil into a fine-textured crumbly condition and to ensure there is no compaction within the root zone.

A Pony-Powered Garden Cart

A Pony-Powered Garden Cart

by:
from issue:

One of the challenges I constantly face using draft ponies is finding appropriately sized equipment. Mya is a Shetland-Welsh cross, standing at 11.2 hands. Most manure spreaders are big and heavy and require a team of horses. I needed something small and light and preferably wheeled to minimize impact to the land. My husband and I looked around our budding small farm for something light, wheeled, cheap, and available, and we quickly noticed our Vermont-style garden cart.

The Cutting Edge

The Cutting Edge

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from issue:

In the morning we awoke to a three quarters of a mile long swath of old growth mixed conifer and aspen trees, uprooted and strewn everywhere we looked. We hadn’t moved here to become loggers, but it looked like God had other plans! We had chosen to become caretakers of this beautiful place because of the peace and quiet, the clean air, the myriad of birds and wildlife! Thus, we were presented with a challenge: how to clean up this blowdown in a clean, sustainable way.

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from issue:

The remainder of this section on Agricultural Implements is about homemade equipment for use with draft animals. These implements are all proven and serviceable. They are easily worked by a single animal weighing 1,000 pounds, and probably a good deal less. Sleds rate high on our homestead. They can be pulled over rough terrain. They do well traversing slopes. Being low to the ground, they are very easy to load up.

Parker Soil Pulverizer

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from issue:

Meanwhile, my senior year was approaching fast, and all of us students began to contemplate what our final project would be with a bit of urgency. Our capstone project tasks us with identifying a need for a product or solution, bringing that product through the design phase, then building that product and displaying at the Technical Exposition. So I had the harebrained idea to embark on recreating not only a scale model of Parker’s Pulverizer, but to also recreate the real thing in full-scale, complete with fresh new wheel castings.

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Log Arch

Log Arch

by:
from issue:

The arch was built on a small trailer axle that I cut down to 3 feet wide and tacked back together. This was done so that I could keep the wheels parallel. I cut the middle out after construction was complete. I used heavy wall pipe from my scrounge pile for the various frame parts. It is topped off with an angle iron bar for added strength and to provide a mount for the winch and some slots for extra chains.

McCormick-Deering No 7 Mower Manual in English & French

McCormick-Deering No. 7 Mower Manual in English & French

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A Hidden Treasure

A Hidden Treasure

When David and Gus visited Mr. Hemmett they had an unexpected find. Not only was there the small tip-cart but other full sized farm wagons. The first that David looked at was a double shafted Lincolnshire wagon designed for the flat lands of that county and too big and heavy for his Suffolk mare of 16.2 hands. But tucked at the back under a tarpaulin was the ideal vehicle – a Norfolk wagon that could take either a single or double shaft and was suitable for the smaller draught horse.

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 3

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In parallel with making hay on the ground, nearly every year I have also made some hay on tripods. The attraction of this method is that it only needs one day of good weather to dry the grass sufficiently before it is put on the tripods, and then the hay takes very little harm no matter what the weather, usually coming out green, dry and smelling of hay two weeks later when it can be baled or stacked.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT