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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Ask A Teamster Round Pen Training

by Dr. Doug Hammill D.V.M. of Montana

Hi Doc Hammill,

We bought a copy of your latest video on teaching horses to drive – and once again (we have your fundamentals 1-4) you have done a beautiful job. It has made an ENORMOUS difference in getting our horses to cooperate with us. I’m wondering if you might answer a couple of questions for me.

Sometimes it almost seems like the horses are getting bored with the repetition of some of the round pen work (i.e. following one around in the round pen). Do you try to alter the routine when this occurs – or is it important that the horse does exactly as you want regardless of what activity is occurring?

Since we are about the only one in the area with draft horses, we are concerned about the farrier that we get to trim the horses’ feet. As you have pointed out in your fundamentals videos, it is important that the farrier does not trim the back too short (and the front of the hoof too long). Since we are quite ignorant on this matter, we are wondering if you plan to do a video that might go into great length on this subject? If not, would you have any recom- mendations on books, videos, etc. that might give us a better idea of how this should be done correctly (i.e., good photos, hoof comparisons, etc.)?

Thanks so much,

Susan

Dear Susan,

Thank you for your kind words. It has always been a gift to me to be able to share my learning with good people and their horses.

Round Pen Training:

There is definitely a fine line between driving a horse away in the round pen to the point of boredom from repetition without variation, and driving them away to just the right point before asking them to stop, turn towards you and come to you, etc.. Likewise, when we ask them to follow us, stop and stay with us, or almost anything else, it can get to be too routine and not interesting enough to hold their attention. It’s our job to read the horse and make a change or variation BEFORE they lose interest.

If we all had the experience and skill of masters of the round pen like Monty Roberts, and other world class trainers, the results and successes would come as rapidly, solidly, and predictably for us as they do for them. However, we each work, practice, and learn at our own level. Fortunately, horses are basically cooperative, forgiving animals, particularly if we don’t lose our patience with them and become loud, harsh, too forceful, or hurt them.

When we ask a horse to follow us in the round pen we can help him succeed by varying things a bit – changing direction and speed frequently, stopping periodically to reward him with a rub (“a rub” or two, not 100), picking up a foot, playing with his tail/ears/mouth, etc. In other words, working at desensitizing or sensitizing him by simulating things he will experience in the future (trimming and shoeing, crupper, bridle over the ears, bit, etc.). There are endless training opportunities that we can constantly blend into all of our time with them – whether in the round pen or just doing our routine daily care and interactions with them. Be consistent in the principles with which you work with them and how you treat them, but vary what you ask of them and what you ask them to accept – and the locations in which you do so (once their progress and the time is right).

We gain control over the horse’s mind by controlling his motion/movement/feet. We also need to introduce variations into this technique to avoid lack of proper response and boredom in the horse. Try varying (controlling) the speed that you ask the horse to travel around the pen. Put extra pressure on and push him faster when his attention wanders, he shows resentful or resistant expressions, tries to make decisions on his own, etc. Look for opportunities to ease up and slow him down a bit when he gives you his undivided attention, begins to relax, and/or show signs of submission (licking and chewing, head down, smaller circles around you, etc.). But don’t wait too long at this easier pace to either ask him to stop and hook up with you if his behavior warrants it, or push him on again if his attention wanders – timing is critical. Try asking him to change directions BEFORE circling one way becomes too much of a routine. If the horse seems content to just keep going around the pen after a half dozen revolutions or so, you are probably not putting enough pressure on to get him to seek (ask for) something different that he will be more comfortable with. At some point, it may help to put pressure on by getting the horse to change directions repeatedly for a time. Just as you turn him and he thinks he can enjoy going the other way, you interfere with his expectations and turn him back, then back again, etc. This emphasizes that you are in control. Sometimes, for greater effect, I use just half the round pen for this, making him turn back repeatedly after only 1/2 a revolution. These variations in technique tend to emphasize to the horse that you can truly control his movement, speed, and direction – that you are the leader and the sooner he accepts it the sooner he can enjoy comfort with you again. However, be careful not to do intense actions like this for too long.

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Spotlight On: Farming Systems & Approaches

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One day my stepfather brought over a magazine he had recently subscribed to. It was called Small Farmer’s Journal published by a guy named Lynn Miller. That issue had a short story about an old man that used a single small mule to garden and skid firewood with. I was totally fascinated with the prospect of having a horse and him earning his keep. It sorta seemed like having your cake and eating it too.

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Mayfield Farm is a small family owned and operated mixed farm situated at 1150 m above sea level on the eastern edge of the Great Dividing Range in northern New South Wales, Australia. Siblings, Sandra and Ian Bannerman, purchased the 350 acre property in October, 2013, and have converted it from a conventionally operated farm to one that is run on organic principles. Additional workers on the farm include Janette, Ian’s wife, and Jessica, Ian’s daughter.

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Congo Farm Project

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Delay ridge building until early fall so that the cover crop on the ridge does not grow more than 12” tall before winter. The residues from a short cover crop will be much less challenging to cultivate than a tall stand of oats, especially if tangly field peas are mixed in. Waiting for the winterkilled cover crop residues to breakdown as long as possible before ridge-tilling in the spring will also make cultivation much easier until you gain familiarity with the system.

Soil, Vegetation, and Acidity

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As a matter of convenience, we plant all of our field vegetables in widely spaced single rows so we can cultivate the crops with one setup on the riding cultivator. Row cropping makes sense for us because we are more limited by labor than land and we don’t use irrigation for the field vegetables. As for the economics of planting produce in work horse friendly single rows, revenue is comparable to many multiple row tractor systems.

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D Acres of New Hampshire in Dorchester, a permaculture farm, sustainability center, and non-profit educational organization, is a bit of a challenge to describe. Join us for this week-in-the-life tour, a little of everything that really did unfold in this manner. Extraordinary, perhaps, only in that these few November days were entirely ordinary.

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I am certainly not the most able of dairymen, nor the most skilled among vegetable growers, and by no means am I to be counted amongst the ranks of the master teamsters of draft horses. If there is anything remarkable about my story it is that someone could know so little about farming as I did when I started out and still manage to make a good life of it.

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Russian household agriculture – dacha gardening – is likely the most extensive system of successful food production of any industrialized nation. This shows that highly decentralized, small-scale food production is not only possible, but practical on a national scale and in a geographically large and diverse country with a challenging climate for growing. Most of the USA has far more than the 110 days average growing season that Russia has.

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Amidst all of the possibility that is out there, all of the options and uncertainties, it helps to remember that there is also a strong community in the draft-farming world. There are a great many like-minded yet still diverse people working with draft horses and ready to share their experiences. What will serve us well within this great variety of farms and farmers is to keep in touch, to learn from one another’s good ideas and mistakes and to keep on farming with draft power.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT