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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Cultivating Questions A Diversity of Cropping Systems

CULTIVATING QUESTIONS

Concerning the Bio-Extensive Market Garden

by Anne and Eric Nordell of Trout Run, PA

A Diversity of Cropping Systems

As a matter of convenience, we plant all of our field vegetables in widely spaced single rows so we can cultivate the crops with one setup on the riding cultivator. Widely spaced rows also provide each plant with a large reservoir of moisture and fertility, enhance air circulation, and make it much easier to cultivate delicate vegetables in stoney or high residue conditions. Row cropping makes sense for us because we are more limited by labor than land and we don’t use irrigation for the field vegetables.

The comments from several visitors made us wonder if our wide row example has given perspective teamsters the impression that all horse-powered market gardeners row crop their produce and consequently earn much less per acre than multiple row tractor farmers. The reality is teamsters use a wide diversity of cropping systems as documented in Stephen Leslie’s essential books, The New Horse-Powered Farm and Horse-Powered Farming in the 21st Century. As for the economics of planting produce in work horse friendly single rows, revenue is comparable to many multiple row tractor systems.

Cultivating Questions A Diversity of Cropping Systems

The chart for our Beech Grove Farm itemizes the sales for all the crops we grew last year. For comparison purposes, we extrapolated the return per 380’ row to an acre basis, fully realizing that these numbers may be suspect due to a whole host of variables that can change when scaling up production, such as prices or insect and disease pressure. The extrapolated return per acre for many of our dry land vegetables is within the range of enterprise budgets for multiple row tractor operations we have seen as is our average return per acre of $19,500 for the 3.2 acres in field production in 2015.

Cultivating Questions A Diversity of Cropping Systems

The crop yield and revenue spreadsheet for David Fisher and Anna Maclay’s Natural Roots CSA in Conway, MA makes a much stronger case for row cropping with horses. Using different management techniques, including narrower row spacing and packing more plants into each row, their extrapolated returns are, in some cases, two to three times ours.

Anna and David’s total vegetable income in 2015 was $97,036 for 3 1/2 irrigated acres in production or almost $27,500/acre. Since most of their vegetable revenue comes from CSA shares, they based the prices for their per acre extrapolation on their local food coop’s prices minus 25-33% due to differences in overhead costs, location, customer convenience and produce selection.

Other important details on putting together these spreadsheets: To determine the income per row foot, both farms counted all the area planted to each crop regardless of whether the entire crop was harvested or marketed. These calculations also took into account adjacent rows needed to grow the crop to maturity even if these adjacent beds were planted to another crop. For example, David and Anna typically alternate rows of sprawling cucurbits or trellised nightshades with short term vegetables. We do the same during the establishment year of strawberries alternating rows with lettuce.

Cultivating Questions A Diversity of Cropping Systems

Although 2015 was a good year for both farms, not every crop performed as usual. Phytophthora, a new disease at Natural Roots, ended the season prematurely for some of David and Anna’s cucurbit and solanaceous crops. The yield of winter squash, potatoes and one variety of garlic was well below average on our farm and demand for salad mix and spinach at the growers market was lower than in recent years.

Anna and David organized their chart by extrapolated revenue per acre so readers could quickly see which crops had the highest potential return. We listed our vegetables in order of total income generated, reflecting our market niche. Both of these variables are needed to determine a profitable crop mix along with the cost of production, labor availability for harvest, and personal preference.

We were not successful in finding other horse-powered growers who kept crop yield or income records, but six experienced teamsters responded to our request to fill out the plant density chart for three transplanted crops. In several cases, plant populations equaled or exceeded standard tractor systems used here in the Northeast.

Cultivating Questions A Diversity of Cropping Systems

Tractor I is based on Richard Wiswall and Sally Colman’s Cate Farm in Plainfield, VT as portrayed in Richard’s Organic Farmer’s Business Handbook. We pieced together Tractor II from the enterprise budgets for brassicas and lettuce in Vern Grubinger’s Sustainable Vegetable Production and the onion plasticulture system used in Pennsylvania by both tractor and horse farmers. No doubt there are horse and tractor powered farms employing more intensive cropping systems than we captured in this plant density comparison.

We also learned that row spacing has changed in recent years for at least a couple of the participants in this survey. For example, Stephen Leslie and Kerry Gawalt of Cedar Mountain Farm in Hartland, VT have actually increased their row width from 32 to 36” in order to implement the horse drawn guidance system described in the

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Cultivating Questions Cultivator Setups and Deer Fencing

Cultivating Questions: Cultivator Set-ups and Deer Fencing

We know all too well the frustration of putting your heart and soul into a crop only to have the wildlife consume it before you can get it harvested let alone to market. Our farm sits next to several thousand acres of state game lands and is the only produce operation in the area. As you can imagine, deer pressure can be intense. Neighbors have counted herds of 20 or more in our pastures.

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All aim to re-connect school kids with healthy local food.

English Sheaf Knots

English Sheaf Knots

Long ago when grain was handled mostly by hand, the crop was cut slightly green so seed did not shatter or shake loose too easily. That crop was then gathered into ‘bundles’ or ‘sheafs’ and tied sometimes using a handful of the same grain for the cording. These sheafs were then gathered together, heads up, and leaned upon one another to form drying shocks inviting warm breezes to pass through. In old England, the field workers took great pride in their work and distinctive sheaf knots were designed and employed.

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The First Year

The First Year

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from issue:

Prior to last year, I had felt I knew the nuances of the land quite well and fancied myself as knowledgeable about the course of the natural world. Outdoors was where I felt the most comfortable. The fresh air and endless views of fields, hills and valleys renewed my spirit and refreshed my mind. I didn’t think there was much that could fluster me when it came to the land. Until I became an organic farmer.

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Biodynamic Meeting at Ruby and Amber’s Organic Farm

Biodynamic Meeting at Ruby and Amber’s Organic Farm

by:
from issue:

One weekend I attended a Biodynamic meeting at Ruby and Amber’s Organic Farm in Dorena, Oregon, in the Row River Valley, just east of Cottage Grove. I always enjoy seeing other food growing operations, as this is such an infinitely broad subject, there is always much to learn from others’ experiences. At this farm, draft horses are used for much of the work.

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Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 2

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Rice as a New Staple Crop for Very Cold Climates

Rice as a New Staple Crop for Very Cold Climates

by: ,
from issue:

If you were visiting Earth from some other planet and had to describe its inhabitants upon your return, you might say that the average person eats rice, and grows it as well, usually on a small scale. You’d be accurately describing the habits of over a quarter of the world’s population. Rice has a special story with an exciting chapter now unfolding in the northeast USA among a small but growing group of farmers and growers.

Cultivating Questions

Cultivating Questions: Follow-Up On Phosphorus

We like to think that the bio-extensive approach to market gardening minimizes the risk of overloading the soil with nutrients because the fallow lands make it possible to grow lots of cover crops to maintain soil structure and organic matter rather than relying on large quantities of manure and compost. However, we are now seeing the consequences of ignoring our own farm philosophy when we resorted to off-farm inputs to correct a phosphate deficiency.

Portrait of a Garden

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A Short History of the Horse-Drawn Mower

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Book Excerpt: The enclosed gear, late model John Deere, Case, Oliver, David Bradley, and McCormick Deering International mowers I (we) are so fond of had a zenith of popular manufacture and use that lasted just short of 25 years. Millions of farmers with millions of mowers, built to have a serviceable life of 100 plus years, all pushed into the fence rows. I say, it was far too short of a period.

Russian Dacha Gardening

Russian Dacha Gardens

by:
from issue:

Russian household agriculture – dacha gardening – is likely the most extensive system of successful food production of any industrialized nation. This shows that highly decentralized, small-scale food production is not only possible, but practical on a national scale and in a geographically large and diverse country with a challenging climate for growing. Most of the USA has far more than the 110 days average growing season that Russia has.

On-Farm Meat Processing

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Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT