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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Cultivating Questions Concerning the Bioextensive Market Garden

by Anne and Eric Nordell

One reason we continue Cultivating Questions is that SFJ readers – both horse farmers and tractor farmers – keep telling us that they’re trying out the alternative tillage methods described in this column. In response to this practical interest, we will also focus on adapting traditional tillage tools to new purposes. Of course, we can’t help throwing in a few notes about cover crops and crop rotation since these “tools” are really the key to making these alternative tillage techniques work on our farm.

In the last column, we looked at how the high-and-dry cover cropped ridges made it possible to begin planting on schedule despite the wet conditions we faced in April 2001. In this issue, we will try to describe how mulch tilling our flat fields saved the day when the weather turned dry in May.

A spring drought in the Northeast is kind of unusual, but by mid-May last year we heard from growers who were already pumping water on their fields to get their crops germinated. At this point, our cover cropped ridges had dried out too much for no-till planting without irrigation. So we decided to take a step down in elevation, and began tilling our flat fields.

Cultivating Questions Ridge-Till Revisited

These flat fields for EARLY planted crops, identified as #8 and #12 in the Crop Map in the last issue, were protected with a moisture conserving cover crop of winterkilled oats and Canadian field peas. One of the advantages of using these winterkilled cover crops is they do not suck precious moisture out of the soil in the spring like a live cover crop of rye. To the contrary, the dead residues blanketing the ground seem to conserve the whole winter store of moisture.

We try to prolong the moisture conserving effect of the winterkilled cover crops as long as possible by working the residues shallowly into the soil. Surface tillage with a disc or field cultivator keeps the “trash” in the top 2-3” of the soil where it will help wick rainfall into the earth, and trap moisture at the surface when it rises from the subsoil during dry weather. In some areas, this conservation practice is called “mulch tillage” because the mulch of crop residues on the surface helps to slow down erosion. In general, we have found that what is good for conserving the soil is also good for preserving moisture.

Mulch tilling the winterkilled cover crops has reliably held plenty of moisture for planting EARLY cash crops, like lettuce, spinach, onions and peas, over the years. If anything, this tillage-cover crop combination sometimes preserves moisture too well, delaying fieldwork and planting. One reason we adapted ridge-tillage to vegetable production is so we would have a high-and-dry alternative in wet conditions. By including both flat fields and ridged fields in our cropping plan, we thought we had our bases covered for both weather extremes.

However, the rapid change from wet to dry in 2001 proved to be more of a challenge than we had faced in the past. The dry weather that arrived the end of April, and finally made it possible to mulch till the winterkilled cover crops in our flat fields, persisted until the beginning of June. We simply did not receive enough rain during that time period to settle and moisten the shallowly tilled soil. Yes, there was plenty of moisture preserved beneath the two inch layer of dry soil and cover crop residues for transplanting lettuce and onion starts, but not nearly enough moisture at the surface for direct seeding fine seeded crops, like spinach and carrots.

We were really scratching our heads about how to keep up with successive plantings of these direct seeded crops when two clues to a solution arrived in the mail from the SFJ office. First, Lynn Miller’s excellent book on Horsedrawn Tillage Tools contained a whole chapter on lister planting and cultivation. It explained how this traditional dryland farming technique relies on planting the crop in the bottom of a furrow a few inches below ground level. The idea, as we understand it, is that more moisture is likely to be found at this depth than on the surface in arid areas. Also, future cultivations will fill in the planting furrow, burying weeds in the row and mulching the plants deeply with soil to hold in more moisture.

Unfortunately, the ingenious tools for lister planting and cultivation catalogued in Lynn’s book are not available here in the Northeast. And trying to build something similar from scratch seemed way beyond our ability. Fortunately, the Spring 2001 SFJ arrived in our mailbox shortly thereafter, and on page 90 a reprint of a 1918 ad for a unique corn planter attachment caught our eye. Guaranteed to improve germination even in rough, dry conditions, The Vivion Hoe and Gauge Attachment, pushes dry, coarse soil to the sides, clearing a fine, moist seedbed right in front of the planting shoe. This clever attachment reminded us, in principle, of the ridge-till sweep we use for knocking off the top of the cover cropped ridges.

Cultivating Questions Alternative Tillage & Inter-Seeding Techniques

Sure enough, the ridge-till sweep did a wonderful job of pushing the top inch or two of dry soil and trash to the sides of the planting beds, exposing a narrow strip of clean, moist soil for lister planting the fine seeded vegetables. By simply using our existing equipment for a totally new purpose, we were able to continue our successive plantings of spinach and carrots on schedule throughout the dry month of May.

Another critical piece in putting together the lister planting puzzle was figuring out how to cultivate a vegetable crop planted below ground level. We found a solution when attending a workshop on field crop cultivation put on that April by Klaas and Mary-Howell Martens, the 1300 acre organic grain growers we have featured in previous columns on nutrient management. The object of their cultivation system is to throw as much soil on the row as possible to bury weeds growing in the rows of their fast growing crops. To do this effectively, they removed all the rolling shields from their belly-mounted six-row International cultivators.

The castoff rolling shields looked like just the ticket for cultivating vegetables in high residue conditions, and the Martens were kind enough to give us a set to try out on our one-row horse-drawn cultivator. As shown in the photo essay in the last issue, the rolling shields seemed made-to-order for ridge-till cultivation with the horses. They also turned out to be the perfect solution for cultivating lister planted carrots and spinach by preventing the soil and cover crop residues (piled up on either side of the below ground planting zone) from burying these low growing vegetables. In retrospect, we ended up relying on the technology from two very different eras of agriculture to adapt lister planting to horse powered market gardening on the spur-of-the- moment.

We include a couple of snapshots of lister planting and cultivating in the following photo essay on mulch tilled vegetables just to show the importance of being able to adapt to the extremes in the weather. Looking back, it is clear that a diversity of tillage options played a major role in making 2001 our most productive year ever. Between the beginning of April and the middle of May, we went from no-tilling the tops of the eight inch high ridges to lister planting two inches below ground to adapt to the rapidly changing moisture levels in the soil.

The photo story also highlights some of the inter-seeding options we used in the EARLY crops last year. Again, our intention is not to advocate the oddball living mulches we use with this single row inter-seeding system, but just to show how it is possible to utilize the between-row areas to improve insect habitat, reduce erosion, conserve moisture, fix some nitrogen, and grow a good bit of extra organic matter. If nothing else, experimenting with these alternative practices continues to keep farming exciting as we begin our twentieth season of bio-extensive market gardening.

Alternative Tillage & Inter-Seeding Techniques For Dry Land Market Gardening

Mulch Tilling For Moisture

Cultivating Questions Alternative Tillage & Inter-Seeding Techniques

1a

1a. An overview of the bio-extensive market garden in April showing the alternating fields of cash crops and fallow lands. In the foreground is a field of mulch-tilled oats and Canadian field peas ready for EARLY planted cash crops. In the second field grows a cover crop of winter hardy rye, building soil structure and reducing weed pressure for the EARLY market garden crops to be planted in this field the next year. Generally we turn under the rye in late June and replant the fallow field to oats and peas early in August following a bare fallow period midsummer.

One of the advantages of using a cover crop which dies back over winter is this winterkilled cover will not suck the moisture out of the soil prior to planting the EARLY cash crops. To the contrary, the mulch of dead oat and peas residues on the surface helps to hold in a whole winter’s store of moisture. By contrast, the over- wintering cover crop of two-foot tall rye in the fallow field has already used up a good portion of the accumulated winter precipitation. Planting an un-irrigated cash crop right after incorporating the rye would be a real mistake if the weather turned hot and dry like it did in May 2001.

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Spotlight On: Equipment & Facilities

Basil Scarberrys Ground-Drive Forecart

Basil Scarberry’s Ground-Drive Forecart

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I used an ’84 Chevrolet S-10 rear end to build my forecart, turn it over to get right rotation, used master cylinder off buggy and 2” Reese hitch, extend hitch out to use P.T.O. The cart is especially useful for tedding hay. However, its uses are virtually unlimited. We use it for hauling firewood on a trailer, for pulling a disc and peg tooth harrow, for hauling baled hay on an 8’ x 16’ hay wagon, and just for a jaunt about the farm and community.

Littlefield Notes: A Slower Pace

LittleField Notes: A Slower Pace

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I will probably never get a chance to sit at the throttle of a steam engine heading up some winding mountain grade and feel the romance of the rails as the lonesome sound of a steam whistle echoes off canyon walls. Nor will I sit and watch out over the bowsprit of a schooner rounding Cape Horn as the mighty wind and waves test men’s mettle and fill their spirits with the allure of the sea. It is within my reach however to draw a living from the earth using that third glorious form of transport – the horse.

Pferdestarke

German Version of Horse Progress Days: Pferdestark

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There is a rather neat phrase in German – ‘wenn schon, denn schon’ – which literally translates as ‘enough already, then already;’ but what it actually means is ‘if a something is worth doing, it is worth doing well. That would be a fitting description of Pferdestark, the German version of Horse Progress Days. For sheer variety of different breeds of draught horses, regional and national harness styles, or for that matter, languages or hats, it would be hard to beat Pferdestark.

Building an Inexpensive Pole Barn

Building an Inexpensive Pole Barn

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The inside of the barn can be partitioned into stalls of whatever size we need, using portable panels secured to the upright posts that support the roof. We have a lot of flexibility in use for this barn, making several large aisles or a number of smaller stalls. We can take the panels out or move them to the side for cleaning the barn with a tractor, or for using the barn the rest of the year for machinery.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Step Ahead: 23rd Annual Horse Progress Days 2016

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I had only been to Horse Progress Days once before, at Mount Hope, Ohio in 2008. It had been an eye-opener, showing how strong and in touch with sustainable farming values the Amish are, and how innovative and sensible their efforts could be. So at the 23rd annual event in Howe, Indiana, I was there partly looking for signs of continuity, and partly for signs of change. Right off I spotted an Amish man with a Blue Tooth in his ear, talking as he walked along.

McCormick-Deering No 7 Mower Manual in English & French

McCormick-Deering No. 7 Mower Manual in English & French

Instructions for Setting Up and Operating the McCORMICK-DEERING No. 7 VERTICAL LIFT TWO-HORSE MOWERS — Instructions pour le Montage et le Fonctionnement des FAUCHEUSES A DEUX CHEVAUX McCORMICK-DEERING No. 7 À RELEVAGE VERTICAL

Mini Horse Haying

Mini Horse Haying

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The first mini I bought was a three year old gelding named Casper. He taught me a lot about what a 38 inch mini could do just by driving me around the neighborhood. He didn’t cover the miles fast, but he did get me there! It wasn’t long before several more 38 inch tall minis found their way home. I presently have four minis that are relatively quiet, responsive to the bit, and can work without a lot of drama.

Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

Planet Jr. Two-Horse Equipment

from issue:

This information on Planet Jr. two horse equipment is from an old booklet which had been shared with us by Dave McCoy, a horse-logger from our parts: “Think of the saving made in cultivating perfectly two rows of potatoes, beans, corn or any crop planted in rows not over 44 inches apart, at a single passage. This means double work at a single cost, for the arrangement of the fourteen teeth is such that all the ground is well tilled and no open furrows are left next to the row, while one man attends easily to the work, with one team.”

Disc Harrow Requirements

Disc Harrow Requirements

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One of the most important requirements is disc blade concavity, that is, correct concavity. Further along we set forth the purposes of disc concavity. We feel it is important enough to devote the extra time and words in a discussion of the subject, because seldom is disc concavity talked about, and very few know that there is difference enough to cause good and bad work.

Farm Drum 25 Two-Way Plow

Farm Drum #25: Two-Way Plow

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Lynn Miller and Ed Joseph discuss the merits of the two-way plow, what to look for when considering purchase, and a little bit of the history of this unique IH / P&O model.

Horse Powered Snow Fencing and Sleigh Fencing

Horse Powered Snow Fencing and Sleigh Fencing

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We were planning on having our cattle out in a sheltered field for the winter but a busy fall and early snows meant our usual fencing tool was going to be ineffective. Through the grazing season we use a reel barrow which allows us to carry posts and pay out or take in wire with a wheel barrow like device which works really well. But not on snow. This was the motivation for turning our sleigh into a “snow fencer” or a “sleigh barrow”.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

from issue:

When bolting the sections of elevator together be sure the upper trough ends overlap the upper trough ahead, and each lower trough is underneath the trough ahead, so the chains will slide smoothly. Bolt the short tie plates to the underside of troughs at the embossed holes in the middle of trough. When bolting on the head section, have the end of scroll sheet underneath the upper trough section. The lower cross plate in the head section must bolt on top of the return trough.

McCormick-Deering All Steel Corn Sheller

McCormick-Deering All-Steel Corn Sheller

from issue:

To obtain the best results in shelling, the machine should be run so that the crank makes about forty-five (45) revolutions per minute or the pulley shaft one hundred and seventy-five (175) revolutions per minute. When driving with belt be sure that this speed is maintained, as any speed in excess of this will have a tendency to cause the shelled corn to pass out with the cobs. The ears should be fed into the sheller point first.

A Hidden Treasure

A Hidden Treasure

When David and Gus visited Mr. Hemmett they had an unexpected find. Not only was there the small tip-cart but other full sized farm wagons. The first that David looked at was a double shafted Lincolnshire wagon designed for the flat lands of that county and too big and heavy for his Suffolk mare of 16.2 hands. But tucked at the back under a tarpaulin was the ideal vehicle – a Norfolk wagon that could take either a single or double shaft and was suitable for the smaller draught horse.

Farm Drum 28 Eds Wester Star Custom Forecart

Farm Drum #28: Ed’s Western Star Custom Forecart

Lynn Miller and Ed Joseph examine a custom horse-drawn Forecart built by Ed’s company, Western Star Implement Co.

John Deere Model A Tractor

from issue:

Your John Deere Tractor has a range of speeds. These various speeds not only give you the flexibility and adaptability you want, but also they enable you to balance the load and the speed for maximum economy. However, if you are handling a light load and want to travel at slow speed, it is far better to put your tractor into the gear which gives you the speed you want than to use a higher gear and throttle down.

Homemade Cheese Press

Homemade Cheese Press

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On the Gies farmstead we occasionally wallow in goat milk. From it we make our own butter, yogurt and cheese as well as drink some. This has prompted me to build a little cheese press to help with the extra milk. The press is made from inexpensive 1/2 inch thick plastic cutting boards used for the top and bottom plates and pressure disks, white pvc pipe, and a plastic floor drain cap.

The Milk and Human Kindness A Look At Butter Churns

The Milk and Human Kindness: A Look at Butter Churns

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Finding an old butter churn at a flea market, one that is still usable can be a lot of fun, and because there are so many types, it’s good to know a few tips to help you find one that works well for you. For one thing, the size of your butter churn must match your cream supply so that your valuable cream gets transformed into golden butter while it’s fresh and sweet, and that your valuable time is not eaten up by churning batch after batch because your churn is too small.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT