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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate Part 2

Cultivating Questions Concerning the Bioextensive Market Garden

by Anne and Eric Nordell of Trout Run, PA

Tailoring The Cover Crop-Tillage Combination To The Planting Window

Finding just the right cover crop-tillage combination for crops planted the last half of June has always been a real challenge in our location. While surface-tilling mature rye and vetch in May works well for fall crops established in July and August, this cover crop-tillage combo does not allow enough time for decomposition and moisture accumulation for end-of-June plantings. Working the rye and vetch a month earlier would provide a more desirable time frame between tilling and planting, but killing this overwintering cover at an immature stage like this often seems futile using a light-weight, two-horse disc. The knee-high live rye bounces back to life after each discing.

Discing a winterkilled cover of oats and Canadian field peas has proven much easier which is why we routinely use this cover crop mix for early spring crops planted in April and May. However, this winterkilled mix decomposes so quickly that by the beginning of June the oat-and-pea residues no longer provide much moisture conserving mulch.

The last two years we have experimented with winterkilled covers that produce a lot more biomass, such as the sorghum-sudangrass mentioned earlier, in the hopes that the resulting mulch of coarse, rot-resistant materials would create better conditions for planting cash crops around the summer solstice without irrigation. An alternative strategy for preparing a moist fertile seedbed for the late June planting window has been to try to figure out a more effective way to shallowly incorporate the overwintering immature rye the end of April.

An answer appeared in the form of Dan Fisher. He paid us a visit five years ago because he was intrigued with our adaptation of ridge-tillage to early season vegetable production. Part of his interest stemmed from the fact that he had helped to develop a ridge-till system for large-scale field crops during his tenure as a biological crop consultant in the Midwest. By contrast to our use of ridge-till as a planting system relying on winterkilled cover crops (see the Spring 2002 SFJ), Dan’s objective for ridge-tilling was the efficient incorporation and decomposition of a live cover crop, like rye, before a heavy feeding crop of corn.

As we understand it, preparation for Dan’s ingenious ridge-tillage method begins right after the previous fall harvest. The idea is to broadcast rye seed over the chopped corn stalks and then rip the ground deeply using a chisel plow equipped with large twisted shovels. The chiseling breaks up compaction caused during combining and incorporates the rye seed at the same time. The reason for using twisted shovels on the chisel plow is they aggressively churn up the earth, throwing the soil and crop residues into low ridges to encourage aerobic decomposition.

Growing the rye on the rough, chiseled ridges provides two important advantages the next spring in terms of sheet composting this overwintering cover crop. First, the ridged soil is noticeably warmer, drier and better aerated than flat ground, creating better conditions for both tillage and decomposition. Just as importantly, the ridged soil surface makes discing more effective by giving the disc blades more purchase than working a smooth field of rye. Dan claimed that knee-high rye would be ready for planting within 2-3 weeks after the first discing!

After Dan’s visit it occurred to us that ridged rye might also make our two-horse disc more efficient at knocking back an immature live cover. Instead of using a hard pulling chisel plow with twisted shovels, we relied on the modified two-row cultivator we call the “ridger” to incorporate the rye seed and form the low ridges.

Based on three year’s experimentation with this technique, we can say that ridged rye definitely makes our lightweight horsedrawn equipment more effective even if several discings are necessary to completely set back the knee-high rye. Our guess is that growing overwintering cover crops on low ridges would also prove to be a mechanical advantage for the tools pulled by a small Farmall tractor like the Super A.

In the following photos we try to detail the steps involved in establishing ridged rye on our farm for the 2002 growing season. We also compare this method for incorporating an overwintering cover crop in April with a winterkilled cover of waist-high sudex, planted in the same field, just to see which of these cover crop-tillage combinations is best suited for that challenging planting window the last half of June.

Ridged Rye Versus Sudex Before Midsummer Lettuce, Beans And Zucchini

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate Part 2

1b. Field 3, in the Summer of 2001, was made to order for setting up a comparison between two different cover crop-tillage combinations. Rye on the north and south sides of this fallow field had been incorporated early enough to establish a mix of sudex and Donegal forage soybeans the beginning of August. These heat-loving annuals had already produced a good bit of cover a month later at the time this photo was taken.

In the middle of Field 3 had been our strawberry patch, established the previous spring along with other EARLY planted crops, and surface-tilled right after the last ripe berry was harvested, mid-July of 2001. After shallowly incorporating this heavily mulched perennial crop with the coultervator, disc, ridger and springtooth harrow, this area was now ready for seeding ridged rye.

We have found the best way to establish ridged rye is to incorporate the seed before forming the ridges. We do this the same way we would normally plant a cover crop on a flat field, first broad- casting the rye with a hand cranked cyclone seeder, and then working in the seed with one pass of the springtooth harrow as shown in this photo. Immediately after harrowing in the seed, we…

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate Part 2

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Spotlight On: Farming Systems & Approaches

Personal Food Production

Personal Food Production

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We can argue about when, but someday within several decades, oil and the plentiful super-market food we take for granted will be in short supply and/or very expensive. We must all start immediately to grow as much of our own food as possible. This is the fun part and is the subject of a vast popular movement highlighted by innumerable books, magazines, and web sites. Square-foot gardening, raised beds, and permaculture are the new rage. We don’t need thirty-million acres of lawns. Flowers aren’t very filling either.

Traditional Agriculture in Siberia

Traditional Agriculture in Siberia

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The agricultural system of the Old Believers has long been one of hand labor. Their homesteads (hozyastvas) were not intended for tractors or horses, with the possible exception of their larger potato fields. Traditionally the small peasant hozyastva has its roots in hand labor, and this has helped maintain the health of the land. Understanding the natural systems is easier when one’s hands are in the soil every day as opposed to seeing the land from the seat of a tractor.

The Farmer and the Horse

The Farmer & The Horse

In New Jersey — land of The Sopranos, Jersey Shore, and the Turnpike — farmland is more expensive than anywhere else. It’s not an easy place to try to start a career as a farmer. But for a new generation of farmers inspired by sustainability, everything seems possible. Even a farm powered by draft horses.

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate Part 2

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 2

Finding just the right cover crop-tillage combination for crops planted the last half of June has always been a real challenge in our location. While surface-tilling mature rye and vetch in May works well for fall crops established in July and August, this cover crop-tillage combo does not allow enough time for decomposition and moisture accumulation for end-of-June plantings.

The Woodfired Bottom-heated Greenhouse Bench

Cultivating Questions: The Woodfired Bottom-heated Greenhouse Bench

It took several incarnations to come up with a satisfactory design for the bottom heated greenhouse bench. In the final version we used two 55 gallon drums welded end-to-end for the firebox and a salvaged piece of 12” stainless steel chimney for the horizontal flue. We learned the hard way that a large firebox and flue are necessary to dissipate the intense heat into the surrounding air chamber and to minimize heat stress on these components.

Littlefield Notes Fall 2012

Littlefield Notes: Fall 2012

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Why horses? We are knee deep in threshing oats and rye when I find after lunch that the tractor won’t start. Press the ignition switch — nothing; not even a click. I cancel the day’s threshing and drive thirty miles to the tractor store and pick up a genuine-after-market IH part. Come home, put in the new ignition switch and still nothing. When we need the horses they start right up, without complaint — every time.

Fjordworks A History of Wrecks Part 3

Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 3

Working with horses can and should be safe and fun and profitable. The road to getting there need not be so fraught with danger and catastrophe as ours has been. I hope the telling of our story, in both its disasters and successes will not dissuade but rather inspire would-be teamsters to join the horse-powered ranks and avoid the pitfalls of the un-mentored greenhorn.

The Brabants Farm

The Brabants’ Farm

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The Brabants’ Farm is a multi purpose farming operation whose main goal is to promote “horsefarming.” Our philosophy is to support the transformation of regional conventional agriculture and forestry into a sustainable, socially responsible, and less petroleum dependent based agriculture, by utilizing animal drawn technology (“horsefarming”), and by meeting key challenges in 21st century small scale agriculture and forestry in Colombia and throughout South America.

Such a One Horse Outfit

Such a One Horse Outfit

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One day my stepfather brought over a magazine he had recently subscribed to. It was called Small Farmer’s Journal published by a guy named Lynn Miller. That issue had a short story about an old man that used a single small mule to garden and skid firewood with. I was totally fascinated with the prospect of having a horse and him earning his keep. It sorta seemed like having your cake and eating it too.

Cayuse Vineyards

Small Farm, USA: Cayuse Vineyards

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How did the grape find itself here on the outskirts of Milton? If you ask one man, Christophe Baron, the answer is simple. “It’s the cobblestone. (The ground) reminds me of home”. For Christophe, home refers to France and the stone littered earth from which many famous French wines grow. Hailing from a family of vigneron champenois, Mr. Baron came upon this corner of the state by chance, saw its signature geology, and decided to establish his domaine right here in northeast Oregon.

Cane Grinding

Cane Grinding: An Age-Old Georgia Tradition

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Most sugar cane is processed in refineries to give us molasses, brown sugar, and various kinds of white sugar. However, some South Georgia farms that raise sugar cane still process it the old way to produce the special tasting sweetener for their own food. One such farm is the Rocking R Ranch in Kibbee, Georgia. It is owned by Charles and Patricia Roberts and their sons. The process they use has not changed in the past 100 years. This is how it is done.

Henpecked Compost and U-Mix Potting Soil

We have hesitated to go public with our potting mix, not because the formula is top secret, but because our greenhouse experience is limited in years and scale. Nevertheless, we would like to offer what we have learned in hopes of showing that something as seemingly insignificant as putting together a potting mix can be integrated into a systems approach to farming.

Sustainable

Sustainable

Sustainable is a documentary film that weaves together expert analysis of America’s food system with a powerful narrative of one extraordinary farmer who is determined to create a sustainable future for his community. In a region dominated by commodity crops, Marty Travis has managed to maintain a farming model that is both economically viable and environmentally safe.

Fjordworks A History of Wrecks Part 2

Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 2

It is always fascinating and at times a little disconcerting to watch how seamlessly the macro-economics of trying to make a living as a farmer in such an out-of-balance society can morph us into shapes we never would have dreamed of when we were getting started. This year we will be putting in a refrigerated walk-in cooler which will allow us to put up more storage-share vegetables.

Raised Bed Gardening

Raised Bed Gardening

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Raised beds may not be right for everyone, and our way is not the only way. I have seen raised beds made from rows of 5’ diameter kiddy pools, and heard of a fellow who collected junk refrigerators from the dump and lined them up on their backs into a rainbow of colored enameled steel raised beds. Even rows of five-gallon pails filled with plants count as raised beds in my estimation. Do it any way you care to, but do it if it’s right for you.

Farm To School Programs Take Root

All aim to re-connect school kids with healthy local food.

Birth of a Farm

Birth of a Farm

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“Isn’t it nice?” I offer to my supper companions, “to see our beautiful horses right while we’re eating? I feel like I’m on a Kentucky horse farm, with rolling bluegrass vistas.” I sweep my arm dramatically towards the view, the rigged up electric fence, the lawn straggling down to the pond, the three horses, one of whom is relieving herself at the moment. “Oh, huh,” he answers. “I was thinking it was more like a cheesy bed and breakfast.”

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

We were inspired to try no-tilling vegetables into cover crops after attending the Groffs’ field day in 1996. No-tilling warm season vegetables has proved problematic at our site due to the mulch of cover crop residues keeping the soil too cool and attracting slugs. We thought that no-tilling garlic into this cover crop of oats and Canadian field peas might be the ticket as garlic seems to appreciate being mulched.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT