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Delivery Wagon Plans

Delivery Wagon Plans

Delivery Wagon Plans

At one of our auctions I purchased a copy of a 1911 edition of The Blacksmith and Wheelwright which featured a set of plans for a Delivery Wagon. Few categories of horsedrawn vehicles generate as much excitement as a true commercial delivery wagon. I wish we had more opportunities to run them through our auction sales as they bring with them such a delightful mix of history and practicality. So we offer this plan and notes with hopes that the wagon builders out there will more frequently revisit this excellent form. It is noteworthy that the author of this plan speaks so well of the innovations this design represents, innovations which vastly improved the utility of the vehicle. This discussion speaks to the elegance of engineering design prevalent 100 years ago. – LRM

Useful Vehicle for Bakers, Milkmen, Grocers or General Purpose.

The length of city bakers’ and milk delivery wagon bodies is generally 7 feet; width across 42 inches and the 36 inch wheels turn under the body, making the height of the body from the floor 40 inches. Which gives about 3 1/2 inches space between body and wheels when the 1/2 inch thickness of tire is deducted.

The objection to these wagons for general delivery purposes is that they are too short and are suspended too high for getting in and out and on this account the “low down” milk, bakers’ and butchers’ delivery wagons were designed and built. While the low down delivery wagon is an improvement, the objectionable features are increased. Suppose the low down body is designed with a regular wagon gear as shown on this working draft and the wheels have to turn under the body, with a five feet wide track, the required space is about 36 inches and if the gear is set in 2 to 3 inches from the front end of the body the space must be 38 to 39 inches, making the length of the gear from center to center 6 feet 10 inches as on this draft while on a city Bakers’ delivery wagon the length of the gear is 5 ft. only. Suppose we carry this gear back, the wheels will strike against the body and will not turn short sufficiently for the width of the street. Suppose we put on high wheels and put under it a short turn fifth wheel with the king bolt set back 15 inches or more, it would turn shorter but not short enough for a 45 inch wide body. All these objections are avoided if we remove the drop center, but then the body will be too high from the floor and two steps are needed on each side for going in and out.

Delivery Wagon Plans

To shorten the frontgear is impracticable, but the rear gear could be moved somewhat toward the front. If the rear part be suspended on elliptical springs, the wheels could be moved forward 6 inches, the length of the gear could be reduced to 6 feet 4 inches, and the length of the body could be reduced to 7 feet or 7 feet 6 inches. The objections are in this case if the body is not shortened it will have too much overhang, and if shortened it will have a cut-off appearance, or in other words, it will destroy the proportions of the body.

Delivery Wagon Plans

Another disadvantage is the expense of building the low down bodies compared with the straight sill structures. If the low down bodies are built without any edge plates applied to the inside or outside of sills, the bodies are not strong enough to carry the weight, and will sag at the center. With a straight sill, no edge plates are necessary and it will carry the necessary weight, but with all those objections the low down wagons increase every year. Their convenience outweighs all other objections. They are handy for country delivery and are fitted up inside to suit either grocers, bakers, butchers or milk delivery, or a combination of the four.

Construction of the Body

The height of the body from the floor in front is 39 inches, and the amount of drop 15 inches, making the height from the floor to door rocker 24 inches; easy to go in and out with one step on each side. The rear drop is 8 inches and could be 2 to 3 inches less by dropping the spring bar and cross spring. The length of the body is divided as follows: the front length is calculated to turn under the body 35 inches. The width of the door is 19 inches, and rear and front door joint to the rear end, 45 inches. This length could be reduced by using a spring shorter than 43 inches. In such a case lower rear wheels must be used, because moving the wheels forward would interfere with the opening of the door.

Delivery Wagon Plans

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Spotlight On: Equipment & Facilities

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

from issue:

Because of the many varieties and mixtures or fertilizer, it is impossible to give complete tables listing them. It is, however, very easy to determine the distribution of any particular fertilizer by proceeding as follows. Put a cloth, or some large sheets of paper under the machine and turn the main driving wheel 57 times for 7′, 51 times for 8′ and 46 times for 9′ machine. Weigh the amount ejected which will indicate the amount distributed per one-tenth of an acre.

Build Your Own Butter Churn

Build Your Own Butter Churn

by:
from issue:

Fresh butter melting on hot homemade bread… Isn’t that the homesteader’s dream? A cheap two-gallon stock pot from the local chain store got me started in churn building. It was thin stainless steel and cost less than ten bucks. I carted it home wondering what I might find in my junk pile to run the thing. I found an old squirrel cage fan and pulled the little motor to test it. I figure that if it could turn a six-inch fan, it could turn a two-inch impeller.

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 4

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 4

by:
from issue:

Over the last few years of making hay, the mowing, turning and making tripods has settled into a fairly comfortable pattern, but the process of getting it all together for the winter is still developing. In the beginning I did what everyone else around here does and got it baled, but one year I decided to try one small stack. The success of this first stack encouraged me to do more, and now most of my hay is stacked loose.

Homemade Ground-Drive PTO Forecart

Homemade Ground-Drive PTO Forecart

by:
from issue:

As we start, consider a few things when building a pto cart. Are big drive tires necessary? Is a lot of weight needed? Imagine the cart in use. Try to see it working where you normally go and where you almost never go. Will it be safe and easy to mount or dismount? Can you access the controls of the implement conveniently? Is it easy to hook and unhook? Where is the balance point? I’m sure you will think of other details as you daydream about it.

The Use and Construction of Home Made Implements

The Use and Construction of Home Made Implements

by: ,
from issue:

It is now possible to purchase a make of machine to suit almost any condition if the money is available. There is no doubt that eventually they will be quite generally used. However, the dry farmers are at present hard pressed financially and in many instances the purchase of very much machinery is out of the question. For the man of small means or limited acreage, a homemade implement may be utilized at least temporarily.

Amber Baker Letter

Hello from Michigan!

Dear Lynn Miller and staff, Hello from Michigan! We have only just started to read your Journal, and have really enjoyed it. First off, thank you for your publication. It is always a special occasion when the journal arrives, my favorite part would have to be when the seasoned farmer imparts some knowledge. Secondly, my dad is trying to figure out how to make a PTO forecart, but we are having difficulty finding information on people who have made their own, or what dimensions to make the cart out of and such.

Bobsled Building Plans

Bobsled Building Plans

Befitting Labor Day, here are two, old-style, heavy-duty, bobsled building plans featuring the sort of sleds you might have found in New England and the Maritime Provinces of Canada. (In fact you might get lucky and find them still.) These are designed to haul cord wood on the sled frame.

Fjordworks Horse Powered Potatoes Part 2

Fjordworks: Horse Powered Potatoes Part Two

These types of team implements for digging potatoes were the first big innovation in horse powered potato harvesting in the mid-19th century. Prior to the horse drawn digger the limitation on how many potatoes a farmer could plant was how many the farm crew could dig by hand. The basic design of these early diggers works so well that new models of this type of digger are once again being manufactured by contemporary horse drawn equipment suppliers.

John Deere Model A Tractor

from issue:

Your John Deere Tractor has a range of speeds. These various speeds not only give you the flexibility and adaptability you want, but also they enable you to balance the load and the speed for maximum economy. However, if you are handling a light load and want to travel at slow speed, it is far better to put your tractor into the gear which gives you the speed you want than to use a higher gear and throttle down.

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

We were inspired to try no-tilling vegetables into cover crops after attending the Groffs’ field day in 1996. No-tilling warm season vegetables has proved problematic at our site due to the mulch of cover crop residues keeping the soil too cool and attracting slugs. We thought that no-tilling garlic into this cover crop of oats and Canadian field peas might be the ticket as garlic seems to appreciate being mulched.

John Deere No 12A Combine

John Deere No. 12-A Straight-Through Combine

from issue:

It is only natural for the owner of a new combine to want to try his machine as early as possible. This results in most new combines being started in the field before the crop is ready for combining. As soon as a binder is seen in the neighbor’s field, the urge to start becomes uncontrollable. When grain is ready for binding, it is not ready for straight combining.

McCormick-Deering All Steel Corn Sheller

McCormick-Deering All-Steel Corn Sheller

from issue:

To obtain the best results in shelling, the machine should be run so that the crank makes about forty-five (45) revolutions per minute or the pulley shaft one hundred and seventy-five (175) revolutions per minute. When driving with belt be sure that this speed is maintained, as any speed in excess of this will have a tendency to cause the shelled corn to pass out with the cobs. The ears should be fed into the sheller point first.

Champion No.4 Mower Reaper

The Champion No. 4 Combined Mower and Self-Raking Reaper

by:
from issue:

The project for the winter of 2010 was a Champion No. 4 mower made sometime around 1878 by the Champion Machine Works of Springfield, Ohio. The machine was designed primarily as a mower yet for an additional charge a reaping attachment could be added. The mower was in remarkably good condition for its age. After cleaning dirt from gears and oiling, we put the machine on blocks and found that none of the parts were frozen and everything moved.

Disc Harrow Requirements

Disc Harrow Requirements

from issue:

One of the most important requirements is disc blade concavity, that is, correct concavity. Further along we set forth the purposes of disc concavity. We feel it is important enough to devote the extra time and words in a discussion of the subject, because seldom is disc concavity talked about, and very few know that there is difference enough to cause good and bad work.

Portable Poultry

Portable Poultry

An important feature of the range shelter described in this circular is that it is portable. Two men by inserting 2x4s through the holes located just below the roost supports and next to the center uprights can easily pick up and move it from one location to another. Frequent moving of the shelter prevents excessive accumulation of droppings in its vicinity which are a menace to the health of the birds. Better use will be made by the birds of the natural green feed produced on the range if the houses are moved often.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

New Idea Manure Spreaders

from issue:

There is no fixed method of loading. The best results are usually obtained by starting to load at the front end, especially in long straw manure. To get good results do not pile any manure into the cylinders. The height of the load depends upon the condition of the manure, the condition and nature of the field. Do not put on extra side boards. Be satisfied with the capacity of the machine and do not abuse it. Overloading will be the cause of loss of time sooner or later.

Parker Soil Pulverizer

Bring Back To Life the John P. Parker Pulverizer

by:
from issue:

Meanwhile, my senior year was approaching fast, and all of us students began to contemplate what our final project would be with a bit of urgency. Our capstone project tasks us with identifying a need for a product or solution, bringing that product through the design phase, then building that product and displaying at the Technical Exposition. So I had the harebrained idea to embark on recreating not only a scale model of Parker’s Pulverizer, but to also recreate the real thing in full-scale, complete with fresh new wheel castings.

Journal Guide