SFJ

Facebook  YouTube

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Delivery Wagon Plans

Delivery Wagon Plans

Delivery Wagon Plans

At one of our auctions I purchased a copy of a 1911 edition of The Blacksmith and Wheelwright which featured a set of plans for a Delivery Wagon. Few categories of horsedrawn vehicles generate as much excitement as a true commercial delivery wagon. I wish we had more opportunities to run them through our auction sales as they bring with them such a delightful mix of history and practicality. So we offer this plan and notes with hopes that the wagon builders out there will more frequently revisit this excellent form. It is noteworthy that the author of this plan speaks so well of the innovations this design represents, innovations which vastly improved the utility of the vehicle. This discussion speaks to the elegance of engineering design prevalent 100 years ago. – LRM

Useful Vehicle for Bakers, Milkmen, Grocers or General Purpose.

The length of city bakers’ and milk delivery wagon bodies is generally 7 feet; width across 42 inches and the 36 inch wheels turn under the body, making the height of the body from the floor 40 inches. Which gives about 3 1/2 inches space between body and wheels when the 1/2 inch thickness of tire is deducted.

The objection to these wagons for general delivery purposes is that they are too short and are suspended too high for getting in and out and on this account the “low down” milk, bakers’ and butchers’ delivery wagons were designed and built. While the low down delivery wagon is an improvement, the objectionable features are increased. Suppose the low down body is designed with a regular wagon gear as shown on this working draft and the wheels have to turn under the body, with a five feet wide track, the required space is about 36 inches and if the gear is set in 2 to 3 inches from the front end of the body the space must be 38 to 39 inches, making the length of the gear from center to center 6 feet 10 inches as on this draft while on a city Bakers’ delivery wagon the length of the gear is 5 ft. only. Suppose we carry this gear back, the wheels will strike against the body and will not turn short sufficiently for the width of the street. Suppose we put on high wheels and put under it a short turn fifth wheel with the king bolt set back 15 inches or more, it would turn shorter but not short enough for a 45 inch wide body. All these objections are avoided if we remove the drop center, but then the body will be too high from the floor and two steps are needed on each side for going in and out.

Delivery Wagon Plans

To shorten the frontgear is impracticable, but the rear gear could be moved somewhat toward the front. If the rear part be suspended on elliptical springs, the wheels could be moved forward 6 inches, the length of the gear could be reduced to 6 feet 4 inches, and the length of the body could be reduced to 7 feet or 7 feet 6 inches. The objections are in this case if the body is not shortened it will have too much overhang, and if shortened it will have a cut-off appearance, or in other words, it will destroy the proportions of the body.

Delivery Wagon Plans

Another disadvantage is the expense of building the low down bodies compared with the straight sill structures. If the low down bodies are built without any edge plates applied to the inside or outside of sills, the bodies are not strong enough to carry the weight, and will sag at the center. With a straight sill, no edge plates are necessary and it will carry the necessary weight, but with all those objections the low down wagons increase every year. Their convenience outweighs all other objections. They are handy for country delivery and are fitted up inside to suit either grocers, bakers, butchers or milk delivery, or a combination of the four.

Construction of the Body

The height of the body from the floor in front is 39 inches, and the amount of drop 15 inches, making the height from the floor to door rocker 24 inches; easy to go in and out with one step on each side. The rear drop is 8 inches and could be 2 to 3 inches less by dropping the spring bar and cross spring. The length of the body is divided as follows: the front length is calculated to turn under the body 35 inches. The width of the door is 19 inches, and rear and front door joint to the rear end, 45 inches. This length could be reduced by using a spring shorter than 43 inches. In such a case lower rear wheels must be used, because moving the wheels forward would interfere with the opening of the door.

Delivery Wagon Plans

The rockers are 1 3/4 x 2 5/8 inches. The 3/8 inch thick panels are rabbeted into the thickness and the joints covered with moldings. The bottom boards are rabbeted into the rockers from the bottom surface as shown on the bottom view. The sizes for rocker plates are either 3/8 inch or 1/2 inch thick and 2 inches wide. On this draft the sizes of the front and parts are 1 3/4 x 2 1/8 inches. If the body were 3/4 inch narrower all the four corner parts could be made 1 3/4 inches square. 1 3/4 inches is required for the glass frame to drop and on top of the key is put to hold the glass frames in position, also the lining boards to close all the inside spaces. The front corner posts must be rabbeted on two sides each for the glass frames to slide up and down, 3/8 inch deep. The rear corner posts are 1 3/4 inches square without any glass frame rabbets, but the 3/8 inch thick outside panels are rabbeted in from both outside surfaces, which is also done to the front corner posts. All four former posts are lapped into the rockers and the top rails are lapped to the posts. The four stationary door posts are dressed 1 3/4 x 2 1/8 inches, 1 3/4 inches is the thickness on side view, and 2 1/8 inches the size across. The reason why it is thicker is on account of the lining boards, which are rabbeted into the posts from the inside, and the 3/8 inch thick outside panels are rabbeted into the posts from the outside. One side on each of these four stationary door posts has a glass frame rabbet. These posts on this lower ends are lapped into the rockers, and on the upper ends the top rails are lapped to it.

Besides the eight posts just explained are four more, two in front and two in the rear part of the body. The sizes of all four are alike, 1 1/2 x 1 3/4. On the front ones the glass frame rabbet is on both sides while on the rear on it is on one side only. The framing top and bottom is the same as on the other posts. On the outside surfaces the 3/8 inch thick panels are glued over it and the inside surfaces the 5/16 inch thick lining is rabbeted in, and on the inside surfaces of door posts the rabbets are cut in for the glass frames to slide up and down. The size of the glass frame stuff is 1/2 x 2 inches. Sufficient play room must be given when the glass frames are painted to move by the rabbet easily and also allowance must be made for the swelling.

The size of all the fence rails in 13/16 x 2 7/8 inches and the tip rails 1 1/4 x 6 1/2 shown at center, tapered down on both ends as shown on the side view. The front center part is 1 1/2 x 1 3/4; on top there is a key 3/8 x 1 1/2 inches to allow the glass frame to go in, and below the key is the 3/8 inch thick lining board. There are two end rails on each end. Two are 1 1/4 x 1 7/8 inches curved the same, top and bottom. The other two are 2 inches thick by 6 inches deep at center and curved at top. The rest of the top has eight curves 7/8 square, and the top is covered with 5/16 by 1 3/4 strips, bent on one edge on inside surface only.

Delivery Wagon Plans

The rear has a gate which is shown open and in position to put on baskets and boxes, and held in position when down on a circular guide with a stop on rear end. If wanted to drop it shield up with a strap or chain. The upper part is framed with a glass frame to drop and sizes of posts are 1 1/2 x 1 3/4 inches, same as the small posts on the sides. All the bottom boards are 1/2 inch thick, and each lengthwise joint is left open 3/16 inch which are all shown on bottom view. To strengthen the bottom boards and to keep them well in position, two strips 3/8 x 1 3/4 are screwed to bottom boards and cross bars also shown on bottom view. The front gear under this body is best adapted for a wagon of this kind, it is very strong and most suitable for hard work: its appearance is far superior to the regular wagon gears and can be used with short and one single tree or with a pole with shaft removed and replaced with single trees without removing the center single tree. The rear part is suspended on three springs clipped under the axle outside of the body.

Delivery Wagon Plans

The dimensions for wheels, springs, and axles for such a wagon are as follows:

  • Warner Patent Hubs
  • Diameter of wheels without tires, 34 x 46 inches
  • Diameter of hubs, front and back, 4 1/2 inches
  • Diameter of hub flange outside 6 3/4 inches
  • Diameter hub bands, 3 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches
  • Length of hubs, front and back, 8 1/2 inches
  • Width and thickness of spokes, 1 1/2 x 13/16 inches
  • Number of spokes, front and back 14 x 16
  • Thickness and depth of rims, 1 11/16 x 1 7/8 inches
  • Thickness and width of tires, 1 1/2 x 1 3/4 inches
  • Elliptic Springs Front
  • Length from centers of bolt 36 inches
  • Open out to out, 10 1/2 inches
  • Width of plates 1 3/4 inches
  • Number of plates, 5
  • Thickness of main plates, No 2
  • Thickness of remaining plates, Nos, 2,2,2,3
  • Clipped top and bottom
  • Three Springs Back (Wagon Style)
  • Side Springs
  • Length from centers of bolts 43 inches
  • Length for front part, 23 inches
  • Length of rear part, 20 inches
  • Open out to out, 7 inches
  • Width of plates 1 7/8
  • Number of plates, 6
  • Thickness of main plates, No 2
  • Thickness of remaining plates, Nos 2,2,2,3,4
  • Clipped to axle
  • Cross Spring
  • Length from centers of bolts, 45 inches
  • Open out to out, 6 1/2 inches
  • Width of plates, 1 3/4 inches
  • Number of plates, 6
  • Thickness of main plates, No 1
  • Thickness of remaining plates, Nos 2,2,2,3,3
  • Clipped to cross bar
  • Plain Wagon Axles front and back
  • Size of axle arms and square ends, 1 1/2 inches
  • Size of axle at center, 1 5/8 inches
  • Length of axle arms for 8 1/2 inch long hubs
  • Width of track, out to out, 61 inches
  • Width of body, 42 inches

Spotlight On: Livestock

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Step Ahead: 23rd Annual Horse Progress Days 2016

by:
from issue:

I had only been to Horse Progress Days once before, at Mount Hope, Ohio in 2008. It had been an eye-opener, showing how strong and in touch with sustainable farming values the Amish are, and how innovative and sensible their efforts could be. So at the 23rd annual event in Howe, Indiana, I was there partly looking for signs of continuity, and partly for signs of change. Right off I spotted an Amish man with a Blue Tooth in his ear, talking as he walked along.

Littlefield Notes Making Your Horses Work For You Part 2

LittleField Notes: Making Your Horses Work For You Part 2

by:
from issue:

Every beginning horse farmer at some point will find himself in need of procuring that first team. After land, this is certainly one of the most critical purchasing decisions you will make in the development of the farm. The animals you choose can make your farming glow and hum with moments of blissful certainty, or contribute to frustration, bewilderment, loss of resolve, and God forbid, horses and people hurt and machines wrecked.

Camel Power in Georgia

Camel Power in Georgia

by:
from issue:

Last spring we got the bright idea to plow some corn with one of the camels, so we went to the shed and drug out the “Planet Jr. one camel cultivating plow”. My 86 year old Grandfather said “Son, don’t worry about thinning that corn, those camels are going to do a fine job of it, for you!” We plowed corn and I have some video to prove it, and as soon as I quit running over the corn and learned how to “drive the plow” we didn’t lose any more corn!

Work Horse Handbook

The Work Horse Handbook

The decision to depend on horses or mules in harness for farm work, logging, or highway work is an important one and should not be taken lightly. Aside from romantic notions of involvement in a picturesque scene, most of the considerations are serious.

The Milk and Human Kindness Caring For The Pregnant Cow

The Milk and Human Kindness: Caring for the Pregnant Cow

by:
from issue:

Good cheese comes from happy milk and happy milk comes from contented cows. So for goodness sake, for the sake of goodness in our farming ways we need to keep contentment, happiness and harmony as primary principles of animal husbandry. The practical manifestations of our love and appreciation are what make a small farm. Above and beyond the significant requirements of housing, feed and water is the care of your cow’s emotional life, provide for her own fulfillment. Let her raise her calf!

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 4

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 4

by:
from issue:

Over the last few years of making hay, the mowing, turning and making tripods has settled into a fairly comfortable pattern, but the process of getting it all together for the winter is still developing. In the beginning I did what everyone else around here does and got it baled, but one year I decided to try one small stack. The success of this first stack encouraged me to do more, and now most of my hay is stacked loose.

How Big Should a Draft Horse Be

How Big Should A Draft Horse Be?

from issue:

As evidenced by our letters and the frequent comments of contributors to this magazine, the question of size in draft horses is a hot issue. I suppose we’d all like to think that it’s a contemporary subject, one which did not trouble people back when horses were the norm. The BREEDER’S GAZETTE gathered the opinions of the most respected Draft horsemen of the 1910’s on the subject of how big a draft horse should be and we’ve reprinted them here. As you can see the subject has provided controversy for a long time and I’m sure it will continue.

Interpreting Your Horse's Body Language

Interpreting Your Horse’s Body Language

by:
from issue:

The person who works closely with horses usually develops an intuitive feel for their well-being, and is able to sense when one of them is sick, by picking up the subtle clues from the horse’s body language. A good rider can tell when his mount is having an off day, just by small differences in how the horse travels or carries himself, or responds to things happening around him. And when at rest, in stall or pasture, the horse can also give you clues as to his mental and physical state.

Horseshoeing Part 4A

Horseshoeing Part 4A

According to the size of the horse and his hoofs the nails should be driven from five-eighths to an inch and five-eighths high, and as even as possible. As soon as a nail is driven its point should be immediately bent down towards the shoe in order to prevent injuries. The heads of all the nails should then be gone over with a hammer and driven down solidly into the nail-holes, the hoof being meanwhile supported in the left hand.

The Big Hitch

The Big Hitch

In 1925 Slim Moorehouse drove a hitch of 36 Percheron Horses pulling 10 grain wagons loaded with 1477 bushesl of wheat through the Calgary Stampede Parade. It is out intention to honor a man who was a great horseman and a world record holder. The hitch, horses and wagons, was 350 feet in length and he was the only driver.

Praise for Small Oxen

Praise for Small Oxen

by:
from issue:

Every day in the winter, and a fair number of days in the summer, I choose to work with a team of Dexter oxen, just about the smallest breed of cattle in North America. Harv and Mr. Whistling Sweets are three years old, were named on a half-forgotten whim by my young children, and stand 38” tall at the shoulder. Sometimes, perched on top of a load of hay, moving feed for my herd of thirty cows, I look and feel comical — a drover of Dachshunds.

Walsh No Buckle Harness

from issue:

When first you become familiar with North American working harness you might come to the erroneous conclusion that, except for minor style variations, all harnesses are much the same. While quality and material issues are accounting for substantive differences in the modern harness, there were also interesting and important variations back in the early twentieth century which many of us today either have forgotten or never knew about. Perhaps the most significant example is the Walsh No Buckle Harness.

Harnessing the Future

Harnessing the Future

by:
from issue:

En route to a remote pasture where the Belgian draft horses, Prince and Tom, are grazing, we survey the vast green landscape, a fine mist hovering in distant low lying areas. We are enveloped in a profusion of sweet, earthy balance. Interns and other workers start their chores; one pauses to check his smart phone. Scattered about are many animal-powered rustic implements. This rich and agriculturally diverse, peaceful place is steeped in contrasts: modern and ancient.

Developing Draft Colts

Developing Draft Colts

During October, 1910, The Pennsylvania State College and Experiment Station purchased a group of ten grade Belgian and Percheron colts and one pure bred Percheron for use in live stock judging classes. An accurate record of the initial cost, feeds consumed and changes in form has been kept in order that some definite information as to the cost of developing draft colts from weaning to maturity might be available for farmers, investigators and students.

Changing of Seasons

LittleField Notes: Changing of Seasons

by:
from issue:

We are blessed who are active participants in the life of soil and weather, crops and critters, living a life grounded in seasonal change. This talk of human connection to land and season is not just the rambling romantic musing of an agrarian ideologue. It is rather the result of participating in the deeply vital vocation that is farming and knowing its fruits first hand.

Methods of Feeding Turkeys

Methods of Feeding Turkeys

In a survey made before starting this experimental work, it was found that there was considerable confusion in the minds of many poultrymen as to the relative efficiency between the mash and pellet methods of feeding. A review of the literature on turkey nutrition and methods of feeding failed to disclose any studies which would be of assistance in answering this question. As a result, an experimental program was outlined to investigate several methods of feeding growing turkeys.

Ayrshire Ambassadors Cooperative

Ayrshire Ambassadors Cooperative

The Ayrshire Ambassadors Cooperative was founded in 2016 by a group of dairymen who want to be outspoken advocates of the Ayrshire breed. Ayrshires are one of the most cost-effective breeds for dairy farmers, as the breed is known for efficiently producing large quantities of high-quality milk, primarily on a forage diet. These vigorous and hardy cows can be found grazing in the sun, rain, and cold while other breeds often seek shelter.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT