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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Great Oregon Steam Up

Great Oregon Steam Up

Great Oregon Steam-Up

by Eric Grutzmacher of Grandview, OR

The 2017 Great Oregon Steam-up is coming soon, July 29-30 & August 5-6. What follows reports on last year’s event. Definitely go if you can.

www.antiquepowerland.com
www.antiquepowerland.com/html/steam-up.html

One advantage the website has is “unlimited real estate,” meaning we aren’t limited by the number of pages in the Journal. I’ve created a Great Oregon Steam-Up Bonus Gallery where I uploaded every picture I took at this wonderful event. Enjoy.

Hi, my name is Eric and I know Nothing about Farming.

I do internetty digital things and live near by, so Lynn lets me do what I can to help out at the Small Farmer’s Journal. Maybe you’ve noticed all the content from past Journals we’ve been adding to the website? Well, that’s me; I’ve read all of it so far and I’m learning. You’ll see.

I’m not a complete noob. I grew up in an agricultural community. Throughout high school my summer and after school jobs were haying for various local farmers and working at Barry’s Dad’s feed store. We had horses for 4H and whatnot. But, in spite of my impressive credentials, the main thing I have learned is how much I don’t know. It’s fascinating.

Great Oregon Steam Up

One of the things I want to do at the Journal is try to get out to some of the events around here and bring back photos, videos and maybe even a report. You may remember I was mentioned as a tagalong when we went to the ODHBA Plowing Match over in McMinnville last April. We made a video and Kristi and I got some great photos. Pics, check; vids, check. So, this is my first stab at a report.

I went to the Great Oregon Steam-Up over in Brooks, Oregon, near Salem. Lynn has been invited and has wanted to attend for years, but this time of year might very well be the busiest time of year for him. He’s always farming or writing or editing or painting or forecasting or businessing or just generally fightin’ the power, yo. It’s nuts, I don’t know how he does it all. So, when I told him I was going to go, he was very interested and wanted a good report.

Great Oregon Steam Up

Below is copy & pasted (and slightly edited) from the Steam-Up website. They can describe it better than I.

The Great Oregon Steam-Up is the largest event at Antique Powerland during the year and it involves all of the museums and many other participants. One of the unique aspects of the event is that most of the equipment is operating.

Learn about the early machinery that made Oregon develop and grow. Hear about innovators and manufacturers of times past. Machines on display include farm tractors and implements, early engines, crawlers, fire apparatus, vintage trucks and cars, logging gear, an early Oregon flour mill, and an authentic steam sawmill. Rides include an historic trolley and a miniature railroad.

And a little something about Antique Powerland to fill in the background.

Antique Powerland, which opened in 1970, was originally established by a group of enthusiasts dedicated to the preservation, restoration, and operation of steam powered equipment, antique farm machinery, and implements. Today, it encompasses an impressive collection of museums dedicated to preserving Oregon’s rich agricultural heritage.

Great Oregon Steam Up

I went in the afternoon on the last day of the two-weekend event, Sunday, August 7, 2016. Things were winding down, exhibitors were starting to get ready to pack up. “Whew!” was in the air; every scene the physical manifestation of a sigh of relief.

Let’s go home.

I wanted to do a good report for the Journal, maybe even conduct my first interview! But in the end, I, being somewhat introverted, was hesitant to bother anybody (the non-intrepid reporter), which leaves us with a bunch of photos and a story that only shows how much I have to learn.

Great Oregon Steam Up

When in doubt, take pictures of everything and let Lynn sort them out, that’s my motto. So I was going from machine to device to implement, click click click. I got into the John Deere area…

Great Oregon Steam Up

Then the Farmalls…

Great Oregon Steam Up

Then I moved on to the Allis-Chalmers section.

Great Oregon Steam Up

I came across this gentleman (center, above) amongst the orange. Maybe because I had a camera and was systematically taking pictures of everything in sight, he thought I was an event authority, or at least basically knowledgable in my subject. He came over and asked if I knew about Allis-Chalmers.

“Nothing at all,” I replied.

“I was curious about the letters used in the model name, what they mean. I did a little research on John Deere and International before I came down, but didn’t look up Allis-Chalmers.”

I looked down the row, did a quick assessment, and said “it looks like, the bigger the letter, the bigger the tractor.” In his rapidly clouding eyes, I saw him write me off as a source of information. To put it kindly. (aside: what is a bigger letter? LOL)

He was far too gentlemanly to simply turn heel, so we cordially moved on to the next specimen together.

Great Oregon Steam Up

“What do you suppose that is for?” he asked, forgetting whom he was dealing with or just being polite. He was indicating the ring around the perimeter of the wheel.

And this popped out of my mouth: “Oh, that’s an accessory or option they could order, so while on roads or paths the lugs don’t tear everything up, but in the soft ground of a field it will sink in and gain traction.”

In his eyes, I instantly regained lost ground. I was as surprised as he. Then he started asking other stuff to which I could only answer, “I don’t know.” Busted.

But see. I told you. I am learning.

P.S. If I was wrong about that wheel, I don’t even want to know. But if anyone knows what the letters stand for…

Great Oregon Steam Up

Spotlight On: Farming Systems & Approaches

The Forcing of Plants

The Forcing of Plants

by:
from issue:

It is always advisable to place coldframes and hotbeds in a protected place, and particularly to protect them from cold north winds. Buildings afford excellent protection, but the sun is sometimes too hot on the south side of large and light-colored buildings. One of the best means of protection is to plant a hedge of evergreens. It is always desirable, also, to place all the coldframes and hotbeds close together, for the purpose of economizing time and labor.

Cultivating Questions Going Single

Cultivating Questions: Going Single

Going single did not occur to us until we began receiving questions from prospective teamsters who felt it would be more manageable and economical to get started with a single horse than a team. After 29 years of market gardening with two or more horses, our impetus to try out one-horse farming was not a question of management or economy, but due to the radically diverging horse temperaments on our farm.

Barnyard Manure

Barnyard Manure

by:
from issue:

The amount of manure produced must be considered in planning a cropping system for a farm. If one wishes to manure one-fifth of the land every year with 10 tons per acre, there would have to be provided two tons per year for each acre of the farm. This would require about one cow or horse, or equivalent, for each six acres of land.

Loose Hay with Ryan Foxley

Loose Hay with Ryan Foxley A Farmrun Production by Andrew Plotsky

Planting Calendar and Other Diagrams

From Dusty Shelves: A 1943 calendar for seeding your vegetable garden.

Farm Manure

Farm Manure

Naturally there is great variation in manure according to the animals it is made by, the feeding and bedding material, and the manner in which it is kept. Different analyses naturally shows different results and the tables here given serve only as a guide or index to the various kinds. The manure heap, by the way, is no place for old tin cans, bottles, glass, and other similar waste material.

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

We were inspired to try no-tilling vegetables into cover crops after attending the Groffs’ field day in 1996. No-tilling warm season vegetables has proved problematic at our site due to the mulch of cover crop residues keeping the soil too cool and attracting slugs. We thought that no-tilling garlic into this cover crop of oats and Canadian field peas might be the ticket as garlic seems to appreciate being mulched.

The Way To The Farm

Lise Hubbe stops mid-furrow at plowing demonstration for Evergreen State College students. She explains that the plow was going too deep…

An Introduction To Farm Woodlands

The farm woodland is that portion of the farm which either never was cleared for tillage or pasture, or was later given back to woods growth. Thus it occupies land that never was considered suitable, or later proved unsuitable, for farm enterprises.

Cultivating Questions Cultivator Setups and Deer Fencing

Cultivating Questions: Cultivator Set-ups and Deer Fencing

We know all too well the frustration of putting your heart and soul into a crop only to have the wildlife consume it before you can get it harvested let alone to market. Our farm sits next to several thousand acres of state game lands and is the only produce operation in the area. As you can imagine, deer pressure can be intense. Neighbors have counted herds of 20 or more in our pastures.

Horse Farming and Holistic Management

Horse Farming and Holistic Management

by:
from issue:

Holistic Management was developed by Allan Savory who was a wildlife and ranch biologist in Africa who was concerned that the advice he could give farmers didn’t work in the real environment and even when the advice was good it wouldn’t get implemented. He developed a program which helps farms create a clear Holistic Goal and then use the farms resources to move toward the goal while being ecologically sustainable.

Back to the Land

Back to the Land

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from issue:

Tired of living in a crowded urban environment with its deafening noise and bumper-to-bumper traffic and eager to escape what they saw as an economy bent on destroying the planet, Matt and Tasha left their home in the Washington, DC metropolitan area in March 2014. In doing so, they became modern-day pioneers, part of a wave of Americans who have chosen to go back to the land over the past decade, seeking to reclaim and rebuild their lives and to forge a deeper connection to the earth, the animals that inhabit it, and to each other.

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate Part 2

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 2

Finding just the right cover crop-tillage combination for crops planted the last half of June has always been a real challenge in our location. While surface-tilling mature rye and vetch in May works well for fall crops established in July and August, this cover crop-tillage combo does not allow enough time for decomposition and moisture accumulation for end-of-June plantings.

Starting Your Farm

Starting Your Farm: Chapter 2

How do you learn the true status of that farm with the “for sale” sign? Here are some important pieces of information for you to learn about a given selling farm. The answers will most probably tell you how serious the seller is.

To Market, To Market, To Buy A Fat Pig

Within so-called alternative agriculture circles there are turf wars abrew

The Brabants Farm

The Brabants’ Farm

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from issue:

The Brabants’ Farm is a multi purpose farming operation whose main goal is to promote “horsefarming.” Our philosophy is to support the transformation of regional conventional agriculture and forestry into a sustainable, socially responsible, and less petroleum dependent based agriculture, by utilizing animal drawn technology (“horsefarming”), and by meeting key challenges in 21st century small scale agriculture and forestry in Colombia and throughout South America.

LittleField Notes Seed Irony

LittleField Notes: Seed Irony

by:
from issue:

They say to preserve them properly, seeds should be kept in a cool, dark place in a sealed, dry container. Yet the circumstances under which seeds in a natural environment store themselves (so to speak) seem so far from ideal, that it’s a wonder plants manage to reproduce at all. But any gardener knows that plants not only manage to reproduce, they excel at it. Who hasn’t thrown a giant squash into the compost heap in the fall only to see some mystery squash growing there the next summer?

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT