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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Great Oregon Steam Up

Great Oregon Steam Up

Great Oregon Steam-Up

by Eric Grutzmacher of Grandview, OR

The 2017 Great Oregon Steam-up is coming soon, July 29-30 & August 5-6. What follows reports on last year’s event. Definitely go if you can.

www.antiquepowerland.com
www.antiquepowerland.com/html/steam-up.html

One advantage the website has is “unlimited real estate,” meaning we aren’t limited by the number of pages in the Journal. I’ve created a Great Oregon Steam-Up Bonus Gallery where I uploaded every picture I took at this wonderful event. Enjoy.

Hi, my name is Eric and I know Nothing about Farming.

I do internetty digital things and live near by, so Lynn lets me do what I can to help out at the Small Farmer’s Journal. Maybe you’ve noticed all the content from past Journals we’ve been adding to the website? Well, that’s me; I’ve read all of it so far and I’m learning. You’ll see.

I’m not a complete noob. I grew up in an agricultural community. Throughout high school my summer and after school jobs were haying for various local farmers and working at Barry’s Dad’s feed store. We had horses for 4H and whatnot. But, in spite of my impressive credentials, the main thing I have learned is how much I don’t know. It’s fascinating.

Great Oregon Steam Up

One of the things I want to do at the Journal is try to get out to some of the events around here and bring back photos, videos and maybe even a report. You may remember I was mentioned as a tagalong when we went to the ODHBA Plowing Match over in McMinnville last April. We made a video and Kristi and I got some great photos. Pics, check; vids, check. So, this is my first stab at a report.

I went to the Great Oregon Steam-Up over in Brooks, Oregon, near Salem. Lynn has been invited and has wanted to attend for years, but this time of year might very well be the busiest time of year for him. He’s always farming or writing or editing or painting or forecasting or businessing or just generally fightin’ the power, yo. It’s nuts, I don’t know how he does it all. So, when I told him I was going to go, he was very interested and wanted a good report.

Great Oregon Steam Up

Below is copy & pasted (and slightly edited) from the Steam-Up website. They can describe it better than I.

The Great Oregon Steam-Up is the largest event at Antique Powerland during the year and it involves all of the museums and many other participants. One of the unique aspects of the event is that most of the equipment is operating.

Learn about the early machinery that made Oregon develop and grow. Hear about innovators and manufacturers of times past. Machines on display include farm tractors and implements, early engines, crawlers, fire apparatus, vintage trucks and cars, logging gear, an early Oregon flour mill, and an authentic steam sawmill. Rides include an historic trolley and a miniature railroad.

And a little something about Antique Powerland to fill in the background.

Antique Powerland, which opened in 1970, was originally established by a group of enthusiasts dedicated to the preservation, restoration, and operation of steam powered equipment, antique farm machinery, and implements. Today, it encompasses an impressive collection of museums dedicated to preserving Oregon’s rich agricultural heritage.

Great Oregon Steam Up

I went in the afternoon on the last day of the two-weekend event, Sunday, August 7, 2016. Things were winding down, exhibitors were starting to get ready to pack up. “Whew!” was in the air; every scene the physical manifestation of a sigh of relief.

Let’s go home.

I wanted to do a good report for the Journal, maybe even conduct my first interview! But in the end, I, being somewhat introverted, was hesitant to bother anybody (the non-intrepid reporter), which leaves us with a bunch of photos and a story that only shows how much I have to learn.

Great Oregon Steam Up

When in doubt, take pictures of everything and let Lynn sort them out, that’s my motto. So I was going from machine to device to implement, click click click. I got into the John Deere area…

Great Oregon Steam Up

Then the Farmalls…

Great Oregon Steam Up

Then I moved on to the Allis-Chalmers section.

Great Oregon Steam Up

I came across this gentleman (center, above) amongst the orange. Maybe because I had a camera and was systematically taking pictures of everything in sight, he thought I was an event authority, or at least basically knowledgable in my subject. He came over and asked if I knew about Allis-Chalmers.

“Nothing at all,” I replied.

“I was curious about the letters used in the model name, what they mean. I did a little research on John Deere and International before I came down, but didn’t look up Allis-Chalmers.”

I looked down the row, did a quick assessment, and said “it looks like, the bigger the letter, the bigger the tractor.” In his rapidly clouding eyes, I saw him write me off as a source of information. To put it kindly. (aside: what is a bigger letter? LOL)

He was far too gentlemanly to simply turn heel, so we cordially moved on to the next specimen together.

Great Oregon Steam Up

“What do you suppose that is for?” he asked, forgetting whom he was dealing with or just being polite. He was indicating the ring around the perimeter of the wheel.

And this popped out of my mouth: “Oh, that’s an accessory or option they could order, so while on roads or paths the lugs don’t tear everything up, but in the soft ground of a field it will sink in and gain traction.”

In his eyes, I instantly regained lost ground. I was as surprised as he. Then he started asking other stuff to which I could only answer, “I don’t know.” Busted.

But see. I told you. I am learning.

P.S. If I was wrong about that wheel, I don’t even want to know. But if anyone knows what the letters stand for…

Great Oregon Steam Up

Spotlight On: People

How Much Land Does a Man Need

How Much Land Does a Man Need?

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from issue:

Close to the village there lived a lady, a small landowner, who had an estate of about three hundred acres. She had always lived on good terms with the peasants, until she engaged as her steward an old soldier, who took to burdening the people with fines. However careful Pahom tried to be, it happened again and again that now a horse of his got among the lady’s oats, now a cow strayed into her garden, now his calves found their way into her meadows — and he always had to pay a fine.

Sustainable

Sustainable

Sustainable is a documentary film that weaves together expert analysis of America’s food system with a powerful narrative of one extraordinary farmer who is determined to create a sustainable future for his community. In a region dominated by commodity crops, Marty Travis has managed to maintain a farming model that is both economically viable and environmentally safe.

Raising Chickens on the Schekel Farm

Raising Chickens on the Scheckel Farm

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We kept our eye on this rooster. He was high entertainment for 3 boys and 3 younger sisters on that farm. We didn’t give him a name, just called him “Rooster,” and Rooster ruled. Other roosters moved out of his way. Hens cowered when Rooster appeared. My dog Browser wouldn’t go near Rooster. Rooster was invincible. Or so he thought.

Today I Prepare

Today I Prepare by Lynn Miller Summering towards seated moments found without splinter found with or without care. No audience save the critical unbecoming self. Were it a long race to now, surprised to be amongst the last running with a chance to go to the target beyond end, tanks full with cupped felt. So […]

Central Oregon Food and Farms

Central Oregon Food and Farms

Who is growing food in the high desert? How can you find it? And how can you contribute to creating a vibrant local food community in Central Oregon? Find out here! By consuming more Central Oregon grown food we keep money in our region, support local businesses, and have delicious, fresh food to eat.

Beating the Beetles – War & Peace in a Houston Garden

Blooming that is, unless the cucumber beetles arrive first.
And arrive they have … “At first I thought they looked like big, yellow lady bugs.” Paul said, “Then I looked…

Ripening

Poetry Corner: What A Boy Lies Awake Wondering

This is a poem from Paul Hunter’s book Ripening.

Icelandic Sheep

Icelandic Sheep

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I came to sheep farming from a background in the arts – with a passion for spinning and weaving. When we were able to leave our house in town to buy our small farm, a former dairy operation, I had no idea that the desire to have a couple of fiber animals would turn into full time shepherding. I had discovered Icelandic sheep, and was completely enamored of their beauty, their hardiness and their intelligence.

American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm

American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm

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from issue:

On a sunny early September day I met Doug Flack at his biodynamic and organic farm, just South of Enosburg Falls. Doug is an American Milking Devon breeder with some of the best uddered and well behaved animals I have seen in the breed. The animals are beautifully integrated into his small and diversified farm. His system of management seems to bring out the best in the animals and his enthusiasm for Devon cattle is contagious.

Loose Hay with Ryan Foxley

Loose Hay with Ryan Foxley A Farmrun Production by Andrew Plotsky

Rainshadow Organics

Rainshadow Organics

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Saralee Lawrence and Ashanti Samuels are Rainshadow Organics, a burgeoning, certified organic operation which fully embraces the tenets of mixed crop and livestock farming. At its core is a full-force market garden. The entire farm comprises one hundred and eighty acres situated in the magnificent, high desert region of central Oregon and subject to a painfully short growing season (some years just slightly over 2 months).

Carriage Hill Farm

Carriage Hill Farm: Crown Jewel of Parks

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from issue:

“Thank you for taking the time to visit our farm.” This is one of the responses that I give to the many visitors as they prepare to leave Carriage Hill Farm, an historical farm which is part of a much larger system of 24 parks within the Five Rivers Metroparks system. The main emphasis of our farm is education and interpretation of an 1880’s family farm with all the equipment and animals from the 1880’s time period.

The Craft of the Wheelwright

The Craft of the Wheelwright

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In these days of standardization and the extensive use of metal wheels you might think there is little call for the centuries old craft of wheelwrighting, but the many demands on the skills of Gus Kitson in Suffolk, England, show this to be very far from the truth. Despite many years experience of renovating all types of wagons and wheels even Gus can still be surprised by the types of items for which new or restored wooden wheels are required.

Farmrun George's Boots

George’s Boots

George Ziermann has been making custom measured, hand made shoes for 40 years. He’s looking to get out, but can’t find anyone to get in.

Great Oregon Steam Up

Great Oregon Steam-Up

by:
from issue:

I went to the Great Oregon Steam-Up over in Brooks, Oregon, near Salem. Lynn has been invited and has wanted to attend for years, but this time of year might very well be the busiest time of year for him. He’s always farming or writing or editing or painting or forecasting or businessing or just generally fightin’ the power, yo. It’s nuts, I don’t know how he does it all. So, when I told him I was going to go, he was very interested and wanted a good report.

Bonjour de France

Bonjour de France

by:
from issue:

A little sign of life from France. Everything is going rather well at the tiniest of farms. Besides the veggies I have been plowing in the vineyards of the Bordeaux area to add some extra income. The drafthorses are back over there, so they need horsemen.

Hand-Harvested Food Challenge

The Hand-Harvested Food Challenge

by:
from issue:

In the winter of 2011, Daniel mentioned a fourteen-year-old student of his who had spent a whole month eating only foods gathered from the wild. “Could we go for two days on the hand-harvested food we have here?’ he asked. “Let’s give it a try!” I responded with my usual enthusiasm. We assembled the ingredients on the table. Everything on that table had passed through our hands. We knew all the costs and calories associated with it. No hidden injustice, no questionable pesticides. We felt joy at living in such an edible world.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT