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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Happs Plowing A Chance to Share
Happs Plowing A Chance to Share

Teri Sardinia of Winlock, WA (Best Lady Plowman) moves her 9-horse hitch down the furrow as her husband, Mike, and friend, Art Sporseen (owner of the 3 leaders), walk alongside. (Photo by Kelly Mahoney)

Happ’s Plowing: A Chance to Share

by Maureen Harkcom of Ethel, WA

Thirty-nine horses plowing in one field is quite a sight! Compound that with the fact that there were 8 breeds represented in 2, 3, 4 and 9-horse hitches, pulling single-bottom up to 3-bottom plows of walking and riding types from various manufacturers, driven by males and females ranging in age from 16 to 80+.

Spectators (estimated at 300 by the organizers and up to 400 by others) had a great time as they watched for the first time or relived old memories of their days behind a plow. Many actually got their hands onto plow handles for a chance to relive history. One gentleman (whose name unfortunately was forgotten) saw publicity announcing the Plowing Competition just a few days after having seen pictures of his grandfather plowing with teams of horses. He decided to come and see first-hand what his grandfather had done and maybe get a feel for what his grandfather’s life might have been like. Talking to competitors, following them up and down furrows, and finally getting to try it for himself, he spent hours in the beautiful western Washington sunshine learning and making new friends. Smiles on the faces of so many told the story of the kind of day it was. One spectator sought me out to thank us for providing such a wholesome, family-type event (I know at least one family came with 3 generations together) and to express his pleasure in attending an event of those numbers with a very obvious lack of law enforcement – and with no need for its presence.

Happs Plowing A Chance to Share

Pat, Tom and Violet (Suffolk gelding, Belgian gelding and Shire mare) on their way to earning the title of Best Going Team with Gean Courtney riding back there behind them someplace. (Photo by Kelly Mahoney)

Experienced plowmen mentored beginners or others with less experience. I even got to take time out to try my hand at a walking plow behind a fast-walking pair (as my torn rotator cuff can attest to, thanks to the only rock anyone saw all day — thank you Gean Courtney) and then on a riding plow behind four Shire mares who obviously knew more than I did about what they were doing (thank you John Erskine).

Happs Plowing A Chance to Share

Organizer Maureen Harkcom (under the watchful eye, and hand, of John Erskine of Monroe, WA) gets a chance to try plowing behind John’s wonderful Shire mares Sydnie, Sam, Icky and Libby (Photo by Triana Elan)

Three o’clock “off the field” time came and went and dinnertime rolled around before we could get people and horses off the field so that results of judging could be announced. I learned a lot that day, one thing being that people were there to share; not many took the competition side of the competition very seriously. Don Anderson of Toledo, WA was our judge — with a tough job handed to him. Everyone was helping each other so he had to really stay on his toes to know who had done what on the various plots. Don brought years of experience and hours of time with lines in his hands to the event and his knowledge of horses and equipment coupled with his watchful eyes saw all he needed to make his decisions.

Happs Plowing A Chance to Share

Clarence Stancil of Tenino, WA drives Jerry and Bird, his pair of Percherons, as Larry Livingston tries his hand at plowing. (Photo by Triana Elan)

When the ribbons were finally presented at dinner (because we couldn’t get competitors off the field at 3 as planned) the following were recognized: Best Looking Lady Plowman, Cathi Greatorex of Longview, WA; Best Looking Male Plowman, Wayne Buckner of Duvall, WA; Youngest Plowhorse, “Eastes” a 2 year old Norwegian Fjord gelding owned by Woody Hoopes of Monroe, WA; Oldest Plowhorse, “Duchess” a 17 year old Suffolk mare owned by Cathi Greatorex; Longest Hauled Horses “Jake” and “Tony” a pair of 8 year old Percheron geldings who made the ferry ride off the island with owner Buzz Larson of Freeland, WA; Best Junior Plowman, Nita Sporseen of Tenino, WA; Best Lady Plowman, Teri Sardinia of Winlock, WA (driving 9 head); Best Open Plowman, Gean Courtney of Oregon City, OR; Best Senior Plowman, Clarence Stancil of Tenino, WA; Best Crown, Clarence Stancil; Best Finish, Clarence Stancil; Best Going Team, Gean Courtney.

Happs Plowing A Chance to Share

Clarence Stancil took honors at Happ’s Plowing, here he lets someone try the handles. (Photo by Wendi Ross)

Spotlight On: Equipment & Facilities

Students on the Lines

Students on the Lines & McD Grain Indicator Plate

from issue:

We conclude our online presentation of Volume 41 Issue 2 with beautiful photos from Walt Bernard’s Workhorse Workshops (www.workhorseworkshops.com) and some hard-to-find info on the McCormick-Deering Plain Fluted Feed “R” Grain Drill Grain Indicator Plate.

McCormick-Deering All Steel Corn Sheller

McCormick-Deering All-Steel Corn Sheller

from issue:

To obtain the best results in shelling, the machine should be run so that the crank makes about forty-five (45) revolutions per minute or the pulley shaft one hundred and seventy-five (175) revolutions per minute. When driving with belt be sure that this speed is maintained, as any speed in excess of this will have a tendency to cause the shelled corn to pass out with the cobs. The ears should be fed into the sheller point first.

McCormick-Deering Tractor Disc Harrow No. 10-A

McCormick-Deering Tractor Disc Harrow No. 10-A

Small to mid-sized disc-harrows are a most useful tillage implement. Some farmers consider them indispensable. Discs such as the McD 10-A may be used with either tractors or big hitches of work horses. This tool will cut both plowed and unplowed ground. Ahead of the moldboard plow, the disc harrow is a valuable tool to cut up and free tough sod. When employed in tandem with spring tooth harrows, a great deal of work can be accomplished in much less time.

Barbed Wire History and Varieties

Book Excerpt: The invention of barb wire was the most important event in the solution of the fence problem. The question of providing fencing material had become serious, even in the timbered portions of the country, while the great prairie region was almost wholly without resource, save the slow and expensive process of hedging. At this juncture came barb wire, which was at once seen to make a cheap, effective, and durable fence, rapidly built and easily moved.

Multi-Purpose Tool Carrier Equi Idea Multi-V

Multi-Purpose Tool Carrier: EQUI IDEA Multi-V

Building on the experiences with a tool carrier named Multi, consisting of a reversible plow interchangeable with a 5-tine cultivator, the Italian horse drawn equipment manufacturer EQUI IDEA launched in 2012 a new multi-purpose tool carrier named Multi-V. The “V” in its name refers to the first field of use, organic vineyards of Northern Italy. Later on, by designing more tools, other applications were successfully added, such as vegetable gardens and tree nurseries.

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 4

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 4

by:
from issue:

Over the last few years of making hay, the mowing, turning and making tripods has settled into a fairly comfortable pattern, but the process of getting it all together for the winter is still developing. In the beginning I did what everyone else around here does and got it baled, but one year I decided to try one small stack. The success of this first stack encouraged me to do more, and now most of my hay is stacked loose.

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 1

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 1

by:
from issue:

For the last ten years, I have made hay mostly with a single horse. This has not necessarily been out of choice, as at one time I had hoped to be farming on a larger scale with more horses. Anyway, it does little good to dwell on ‘what if ’. The reality is that I am able to make hay, and through making and modifying machinery, I probably have a better understanding of hay making and the mechanics of draught.

McCormick-Deering Ensilage Cutter No 12B

McCormick-Deering Ensilage Cutter No. 12B

from issue:

IMPORTANT TO McCORMICK DEERING OWNERS: This pamphlet has been prepared and is furnished for the purpose of giving the user as much information as possible pertaining to the care and operation of this machine. The owner is urged to read and study this instruction pamphlet and if ordinary care is exercised, he will be assured of satisfactory service.

Portable Poultry

Portable Poultry

An important feature of the range shelter described in this circular is that it is portable. Two men by inserting 2x4s through the holes located just below the roost supports and next to the center uprights can easily pick up and move it from one location to another. Frequent moving of the shelter prevents excessive accumulation of droppings in its vicinity which are a menace to the health of the birds. Better use will be made by the birds of the natural green feed produced on the range if the houses are moved often.

Bobsled Building Plans

Bobsled Building Plans

Here are two, old-style, heavy-duty, bobsled building plans featuring the sort of sleds you might have found in New England and the Maritime Provinces of Canada. (In fact you might get lucky and find them still.) These are designed to haul cord wood on the sled frame.

Living With Horses

Living With Horses

by:
from issue:

The French breed of Ardennes is closer to what the breed has been in the past. The Ardennes has always been a stockier type of horse, rude as its environment. Today the breed has dramatically changed into a real heavy horse. If the Ardennes had an average weight between 550 and 700kg in the first part of the last century, the balance shows today 1000kg and more. Thus the difference between the Ardennes and their “big” sisters, the Brabants in Belgium, or the Trait du Nord in France, has gone.

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 2

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 2

by:
from issue:

From reading the Small Farmers Journal, I knew that some people are equally happy with either model, but because McCormick Deering had gone to the trouble of developing the No. 9, it suggests they could see that there were improvements to be made on the No. 7. Even if the improvement was small, with a single horse any improvement was likely to increase my chance of success.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No. 594

from issue:

When starting a new side rake, turn the reel by hand to be sure it revolves freely and the teeth do not strike the stripper bars. Then throw the rake in gear and turn the wheel by hand to see that the tooth bars and gears run free. Breakage of parts, which causes serious delay and additional expense, can be avoided by taking these precautions before entering the field.

Disc Harrow Requirements

Disc Harrow Requirements

by:
from issue:

One of the most important requirements is disc blade concavity, that is, correct concavity. Further along we set forth the purposes of disc concavity. We feel it is important enough to devote the extra time and words in a discussion of the subject, because seldom is disc concavity talked about, and very few know that there is difference enough to cause good and bad work.

The New Idea No5 Transplanter

The NEW IDEA No. 5 Transplanter

from issue:

The planting distances or intervals at which the water is released, is controlled by the gear and pinions under the shield near the driver’s right foot. The large, flat-faced gear should be so turned that the arrow on the back points straight up. The numbers on either side of the arrow will then be so arranged that the number 1, 2, 3 and 4 will be on the side of the water trip lever and will denote the various positions in which the Driven Pinion meshes with the gear.

McD Lime Spreader

Parts lists and illustrations are included in this comprehensive overview

The Brabants Farm

The Brabants’ Farm

by:
from issue:

The Brabants’ Farm is a multi purpose farming operation whose main goal is to promote “horsefarming.” Our philosophy is to support the transformation of regional conventional agriculture and forestry into a sustainable, socially responsible, and less petroleum dependent based agriculture, by utilizing animal drawn technology (“horsefarming”), and by meeting key challenges in 21st century small scale agriculture and forestry in Colombia and throughout South America.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT