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Hog Housing
Hog Housing

Hog Housing

taken from a 1927 issue of Farm Mechanics magazine

When farrowing time comes the last of February or the first of March in the northern sections of the country, the sows and the young pigs will be better off in a good weather-tight house, such as the one shown above. This is the sort of farrowing house that keeps the young pigs warm and free from cold draughts that quickly end their lives. Besides, it has a system of ventilation that admits fresh air without drafts and prevents condensation that quickly coats the walls with water and frost.

This house is designed to provide for 20 sows and their pigs. It is constructed of hollow clay building tile, which provides a substantial structure, the air spaces in the blocks insulating the building against heat and cold. Windows on the south slope of the roof admit sunshine to the pens on both sides, giving heat and comfort to the animals and keeping the pens sanitary.

Hog Housing

The partial floor plan shows the interior arrangement of the house. Through the center there is a feed alley, which makes the work of feeding the animals and removing the litter easy. Feed troughs at each of the ends provides a sanitary place for the slop and ground feed, and when constructed of concrete or metal makes them easy to clean and keep clean. Small doors open out of the pens to the feeding floor which run the length of building, so that the house may be used for the growing pigs. The construction of the building is such that the house will be cool in summer.

The building is set on a concrete foundation and has a concrete floor, which may be hosed out when necessary. The pens may be of the removable type so that the house will hold a rather large herd of growing animals.

Hog Housing

The cross-sectional view of the house, which accompanies the floor plan, gives the details of constructing this house. The house may be as long as is wanted for the herd of brood sows, using the same width as the plans below.