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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

by Tony McQuail of Lucknow, ON

We’d been farming with horses and a small tractor for PTO and front end loader work for a number of years. In the winter we used the tractor and an old snow blower I’d got cheap at a summer auction sale to keep our long and hilly lane open. Blowing snow wasn’t a lot of joy. Our lane sloped down to the west which is where our winds tend to come from. Our tractor is not 4 wheel drive so blowing worked best going down hill. With no cab I usually got thoroughly covered with snow dust blown into every crack in my clothing, visibility was lousy and wearing a snow mobile helmet just made it worse as the snow would build up on the visor. But we wanted to keep the lane clear and snow blowing was my option.

Fortunately we had taken a Holistic Management course before the old snow blower had the main bearing seize during the second snow of the season. I’d already done some repairs during the first snow that year and decided it was beyond repair. Before HM training I would have bit the bullet and rushed out to buy a new blower from a dealer at the height of the season – no chance to wait for a summer auction sale. But with HM training we defined the problem and it wasn’t lack of a snow blower. It was winter access to our farm. We started considering various options. Could we hire a neighbor to blow the lane, could we leave the car and truck at the end of the lane and just hand shovel space for them (we’d done this for 9 years before we had the tractor and blower), could we use a horse powered snow scoop to clear the lane, should we replace the snow blower? We started exploring the options. We called the neighbor but they weren’t keen on adding our lane (which is long and hilly) to their list of lanes they were already custom blowing. We borrowed a neighbours snow scoop and tried it with our horses. We took all the options through the testing questions. The horse powered snow scoop ended up the choice that best fit with our Holistic Goal and we were able to purchase one with a savings over a replacement snow blower that was more than the cost of the HM course we’d taken. HM was certainly helping us make win/win/win decisions.

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

The snow scoop is designed and fabricated by a local Mennonite, Abraham M. Sherk, who takes orders each fall and then sets up his shop to make them for delivery before winter. We’ve now been using it for over 10 years and it works well. A picture is worth a thousand words so I’ll include some photos and also the plans he drew up. If you decide to use the plans to build one could you please send $20 to Abraham M. Sherk, RR #1, Wroxeter, ON, N0G 2X0, in appreciation for his drawings and sharing the design. We figured sharing the plans with everyone through the pages of the Small Farmer’s Journal would be better than asking people to write for plans.

It has the advantage over a V-plow in that you can remove the snow from the lane without pushing up banks. We are in the snow belt east of Lake Huron and if we push up banks they drift in and then we are pushing up even higher banks. This is the same advantage a snow blower has over a plow.

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

The scoop has two steel sides about 5 feet apart sitting on steel runners made out of heavy 2 X 2 angle iron, there is a blade that is lowered and raised by use of a foot release which allows the weight of the blade to lower it and then lock in the down position and the forward motion of the horses to raise it and lock it in the up position. This is accomplished by a clever pivoting action where the tongue attaches to the snow scoop. There is a platform to stand on the back of the scoop where you can access the foot release. There is a board attached to the back of the blade that you can stand on to put more down pressure if you need it when scooping.

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

I use a team on the snow scoop and find it is good winter exercise for the horses so I alternate teams so everyone gets some work. The basic routine is I hitch the horses to the scoop – if it was frozen down I loosen the runners first. I pull into position on the lane, stop the horses, step on the foot release and the blade drops down. I make sure it has locked into position and then get the horses to walk forward. The snow curls up the blade and rolls up a cylinder of snow 5 feet long and up to about 4 feet in diameter. Once the scoop is full I pull off the lane and after we are some distance from the lane I hit the foot release, the blade raises and the snow feathers out below it in a long pile 5 feet wide and 12 inches deep. I then return to the lane with the empty scoop, lower the blade and repeat the process. It is worth thinking about where to dump the snow to allow effective use of the horses. I do a number of piles off the side of the lane so I can make loops where I’m picking up snow on one side of the loop and dumping it on the other side working my way down or up the lane. The 5 foot width would be fine for a sleigh but is a little narrow for cars and trucks so I make a second pass beside the first that is about half of the previous cut. If the snow is really deep it can take a bit of encouragement to get the one horse to walk in the snow.

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

When dumping the snow there are various ways to handle it. If you have a pond or dugout you want to fill with spring run off, piling the snow up hill from it would be of value. The way I tend to make my piles is to dump the first load at the end of my loop away from the lane. Then the next time I’m dumping on that loop I trip 10 feet before the last dump and so on with each additional dump. This tends to build up a low even pile. If the weather is crisp this snow will be hard enough the next day to have one of the runners up on it the next time we are clearing the lane and I can dump beside it. I place a second strip of snow beside the first overlapping a bit. Then I can build runs back and forth on top of this base. It is good if things stay crisp enough that the horses can walk on top of the old snow without punching in too much.

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

It works best when the snow is not much more than 8 inches deep. When it is deeper it takes a lot of trips to move the snow off the lane. If it get really deep it can be a bit of a challenge for the horses to get through when they are taking the full scoop off to dump it. In that case it can be a good idea to use the scoop to clear the trail and pack it a bit so that the snow will have some place to fall out. If you don’t it can be hard to get the snow to fall out if you are trying to drop it in deep snow. As the snow pile builds up in can get 4 to 5 feet high and so some care needs to be taken to make the approach and backend of the pile gentle enough that the horse can just walk up the pile easily and exit the same way.

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

If the snow is wet and heavy with the temperature at freezing it can be a bit more of a challenge to get the snow to leave the snow scoop. In those situations I raise the blade – then back the horses up about 5 feet – When we pull forward this usually knocks the top off the pile of snow. I may have to repeat this several times before the scoop is clear. With the snow blower this type of snow also used to plug up in the blower chute – sometimes it was impossible to blow snow in these conditions.

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

Spotlight On: How-To & Plans

The Tip Cart

The Tip Cart

by:
from issue:

When horses were the main source of power on every farm, in the British Isles it was the tip-cart, rather than the wagon which was the most common vehicle, and for anyone farming with horses, it is still an extremely useful and versatile piece of equipment. The farm cart was used all over the country, indeed in some places wagons were scarcely used at all, and many small farms in other areas only used carts.

Homemade Beet Grinder

Homemade Beet Grinder

by:
from issue:

This is my small beet grinder I built about 6 years ago. It has done nearly daily duty for that time. The beet fodder is added to my goat and rabbit rations which are largely homemade. Adding the pulp to the grain rations has aided me in having goat milk throughout the winter months. My beets are the Colossal Red Mangels. Many grow up to 2 feet long. I cut off enough for a day’s feed and grind it up each morning. Beets oxidize like cut apples. Fresh is best!

Disc Harrow Requirements

Disc Harrow Requirements

by:
from issue:

One of the most important requirements is disc blade concavity, that is, correct concavity. Further along we set forth the purposes of disc concavity. We feel it is important enough to devote the extra time and words in a discussion of the subject, because seldom is disc concavity talked about, and very few know that there is difference enough to cause good and bad work.

The Milk and Human Kindness Wensleydale Cheese

The Milk and Human Kindness: Wensleydale Cheese

by:
from issue:

Like all ancient British cheeses, Wensleydale, a Yorkshire dales cheese was originally a sheep milk cheese. It’s been made for centuries in Yorkshire, shifting from sheep milk to cow milk as cows became more prevalent and more productive, into the 19th century. It is in a circular form, more or less cubic in proportion. Wensleydale is a very classy, delicious vibrant creation when all goes well on cheese making day.

How To Dry Up A Doe Goat

How To Dry Up A Doe Goat

You are probably thinking why would I want to dry up a doe? If the plan is to rebreed the doe, then she will need time to rebuild her stamina. Milk production takes energy. Kid production takes energy, too. If the plan is to have a fresh goat in March, then toward the end of October start to dry her up. The first thing to do is cut back on her grain. Grain fuels milk production.

"Work Horse Handbook, 2nd Edition" by Lynn Miller

Draft Collars and How To Size Them

It is difficult to accurately measure a horse’s neck without fitting. In other words, there are so many variables involved in the shape and size of a horse’s neck that the only accurate and easy way to size the neck is to use several collars and put them on one at a time until fitting is found.

Horseshoeing Part 2A

Horseshoeing Part 2A

As there are well-formed and badly formed bodies, so there are well-formed and badly formed limbs and hoofs. The form of the hoof depends upon the position of the limb. A straight limb of normal direction possesses, as a rule, a regular hoof, while an oblique or crooked limb is accompanied by an irregular or oblique hoof. Hence, it is necessary, before discussing the various forms of the hoof, to consider briefly the various positions that may be assumed by the limbs.

The Milk and Human Kindness Making Camembert

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Camembert

by:
from issue:

Camembert is wonderful to make, even easy to make once the meaning of the steps is known and the rhythm established. Your exceptionally well fed, housed and loved home cow will make just the best and cleanest milk for this method. A perfect camembert is a marvelous marriage of flavor and texture. The ripening process is only a matter of a few weeks and when they’re ripe they’re ripe and do not keep long.

Homemade Cheese Press

Homemade Cheese Press

by:
from issue:

On the Gies farmstead we occasionally wallow in goat milk. From it we make our own butter, yogurt and cheese as well as drink some. This has prompted me to build a little cheese press to help with the extra milk. The press is made from inexpensive 1/2 inch thick plastic cutting boards used for the top and bottom plates and pressure disks, white pvc pipe, and a plastic floor drain cap.

Sleds

Sleds

by:
from issue:

The remainder of this section on Agricultural Implements is about homemade equipment for use with draft animals. These implements are all proven and serviceable. They are easily worked by a single animal weighing 1,000 pounds, and probably a good deal less. Sleds rate high on our homestead. They can be pulled over rough terrain. They do well traversing slopes. Being low to the ground, they are very easy to load up.

Book Review Butchering

Two New Butchering Volumes

Danforth’s BUTCHERING is an unqualified MASTERPIECE! One which actually gives me hope for the furtherance of human kind and the ripening of good farming everywhere because, in no small part, of this young author’s sensitive comprehension of the modern disconnect with food, feeding ourselves, and farming.

Rebuilding the New Idea Manure Spreader

Rebuilding the New Idea Manure Spreader

by:
from issue:

To select a Model 8, 10 or 10A for rebuilding, if you have a few to choose from – All New Idea spreaders have the raised words New Idea, Coldwater, Ohio on the bull gear. The No. 8 is being rebuilt in many areas due to the shortage of 10A’s and because they are still very popular. The 10A is the most recent of the spreaders and all three can be rebuilt. The 10 and 10A are the most popular for rebuilding as parts are available for putting these spreaders back into use.

How To Prune a Formal Hedge

How To Prune A Formal Hedge

This guide to hedge-trimming comes from The Pruning Answer Book by Lewis Hill and Penelope O’Sullivan. Q: What’s the correct way to shear a formal hedge? A: The amount of shearing depends upon the specific plant and whether the hedge is formal or informal. You’ll need to trim an informal hedge only once or twice a year, although more vigorous growers, such as privet and ninebark, may need additional clippings.

Horseshoeing Part 4B

Horseshoeing Part 4B

Forging is that defect of the horse’s gait by reason of which, at a trot, he strikes the ends of the branches or the under surface of the front shoe with the toe of the hind shoe or hoof of the same side. Forging is unpleasant to hear and dangerous to the horse. It is liable to wound the heels of the forefeet, damages the toes or the coronet of the hind hoofs, and often pulls off the front shoes.

Horseshoeing Part 5A

Horseshoeing Part 5A

All shoes whose ground-surface is provided with contrivances to prevent slipping upon snow and ice are called winter shoes. These various contrivances are produced by several processes called “methods of sharpening.” All methods may be gathered into two groups, – namely, practical sharp-shoeing and impractical. Only the first will be considered.

Basil Scarberrys Ground-Drive Forecart

Basil Scarberry’s Ground-Drive Forecart

by:
from issue:

I used an ’84 Chevrolet S-10 rear end to build my forecart, turn it over to get right rotation, used master cylinder off buggy and 2” Reese hitch, extend hitch out to use P.T.O. The cart is especially useful for tedding hay. However, its uses are virtually unlimited. We use it for hauling firewood on a trailer, for pulling a disc and peg tooth harrow, for hauling baled hay on an 8’ x 16’ hay wagon, and just for a jaunt about the farm and community.

To Market, To Market, To Buy A Fat Pig

Within so-called alternative agriculture circles there are turf wars abrew

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT