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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

INSTRUCTIONS FOR
SETTING UP AND OPERATING

International Harvester
FERTILIZER DISTRIBUTOR

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

No. 5 A Fertilizer distributor
Working widths: 7′, 8′ and 9′

SETTING UP. If the machine arrives with the wheels off, carefully grease the main axles and wheel sleeves before putting the wheels in place, and be sure to adjust the axle washers carefully. As the fertilizer box will be completely set up with nearly all the working mechanism in place, it will simply be necessary to attach the thills with braces as shown in Fig. 1 on the front page. Tighten all bolts thoroughly, see that all cups are filled with oil, and that all parts work freely.

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

IMPORTANT. Move the adjusting lever “A” (see Fig. 2) up and down briskly a few times to determine whether the long pitman rods and feed plates slide freely.

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

USE OF WET OR DAMP FERTILIZERS. The machine will give the best results when wet or damp fertilizer is not used, and when the fertilizer is free from hard lumps.

If wet or damp fertilizer is being distributed, however, the spacing plates (D) should be inserted as shown in Fig. 3.

NOTE: As most fertilizer mixtures absorb moisture very quickly, the following rules should be observed.

  1. The fertilizer should be stored in a dry place.
  2. Do not start too early in the morning or in damp weather.
  3. Do not place the sacks on wet ground but on a board.
  4. Do not keep fertilizer in a wet machine.
  5. Always clean the machine thoroughly after use.

ADJUSTMENT FOR ORDINARY QUANTITIES. This is simply and easily done by means of the adjusting lever “A” as shown in Fig. 2.

By setting the lever in one of the numbered notches of the indicator dial the distribution will be approximately in accordance with the following tables “A” and “B”, when dry fertilizer is distributed, with or without the special bottom.

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

TABLE “A”. Indicating the approximate distribution quantities for 7′, 8′ and 9′ Fertilizer Distributors when special bottom is used. NOTE: When Special Fine Screens are used, the distribution quantities will be about 1/3 of the figures in the above table. See also “Use of excessively light running fertilizers.”

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

TABLE “B”. Indicating the approximate distribution quantities for 7′, 8′ and 9′ Fertilizer Distributors when special bottom is used. NOTE: The special bottom should only be used when desired quantities are not obtainable without it. To put in the special bottom raise the agitator-feeder and put the special bottom beneath it. Small quantities of Nitrate of Lime can be distributed by removing the agitator-feeder and placing wood plugs in slots in box ends.

TESTING FOR QUANTITY.

Because of the many varieties and mixtures of fertilizer, it is impossible to give complete tables listing them. It is, however, very easy to determine the distribution of any particular fertilizer by proceeding as follows. Put a cloth, or some large sheets of paper under the machine and turn the main driving wheel 57 times for 7′, 51 times for 8′ and 46 times for 9′ machine. Weigh the amount ejected which will indicate the amount distributed per one-tenth of an acre.

If the fertilizer is damp, due allowance must be made for the moisture content when reckoning the amount deposited.

DISTRIBUTING LIME.

Properly screened lime free from lumps can be distributed up to 1050 pounds per acre by placing the spacing plates on the locking bolts as shown in Fig. 3. (See “D”, spacing plates).

DISTRIBUTING SUPERPHOSPHATE.

When distributing superphosphate or similar fertilizer the two spring pressure rods (See “C”, Fig. 3) should always be in place as these will enable the agitator feeder to scrape the box bottom clean.

By pulling these rods upwards they can easily be removed when you desire to take out the agitator-feeder for cleaning.

USE OF EXCESSIVELY LIGHT RUNNING FERTILIZERS.

For distributing excessively light and dry fertilizers in small quantities, especially Saltpeter or Nitrate of Lime, it is necessary to use special fine screens.

These screens will be supplied on special order only and when they are used the distribution quantities will be about 1/3 of the figures shown in table “A” on page 4. If still smaller quantities are to be distributed, the agitator-feeder must be taken out and wood plugs inserted in the slots in the box ends to prevent the fertilizer from running out.

When not sowing or when driving from one field to another and when filling the hopper with saltpeter or other light running fertilizer, put the adjusting handle on “O”; the bottom in the hopper is then closed.

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

USING THE FERTILIZER DISTRIBUTOR AS BROADCAST SEEDER.

The fertilizer distributor may be used as a broadcast seeder.

When used for this purpose it should be well cleaned and all fertilizer should be scraped from the bottoms.

Table “D” indicates the approximate quantities which can be sown when special bottom is used and table “E” indicates the quantities when this bottom is not used. These seeding tables are only reliable at a certain weight of the unit measure, and therefore the machine should be tested before starting. The test is made as follows: Put a cloth or some large sheets of pa- per under the machine. Turn the main driving wheel 57 times for 7′, 51 times for 8′ and 46 times for 9′ machine. Weigh the amount of grain ejected which equals the amount of one-tenth of an acre.

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

COMBINED WINDSHIELD AND SCATTERING BOARDS.

This arrangement (which is supplied on special order only), will be found desirable in windy districts. It is also advantageous when distributing excessively light running fertilizers.

It should be attached to the front edge of lower bottom, as shown in Fig. 4

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

ONE HORSE HITCH.

Showing the thills with cross brace and singletree attached. (Regarding side braces see Figure 1).

TWO HORSE ATTACHMENT.

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

AMMONIA ATTACHMENT.

This attachment will ensure an even distribution of sulphate of ammonia and other similar fertilizers which have a tendency to bridge in the box.

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

Placing in the Box.

Unbolt the two hinged box braces “A” (Fig. 9 A). Interchange the two bolts “B” (Fig. 9 A) with the eye bolts 14513-G (Fig. 9 B) and fasten the attachment to them. Put on the hinged box braces and insert the spring pressure rods. See that the spring pressure rods are inserted in the draw bar connections “C” (Fig. 9 A) as the draw bar gives the fingers of the attachment their motion. Be sure that the hinged box braces are well tightened on the rear bolts before the machine is used.

The ammonia attachment should be taken out when cleaning the box and should not be used for fertilizers that can be satisfactorily distributed without it.

OILING.

Oiling should be frequently done and the oilcups carefully closed to exclude dust and fertilizer.

The oil cups for the drive mechanism of the agitator-feeder and the countershaft bearings must be filled several times a day.

Only use machine oil of good quality.

STORING.

Never store the machine without cleaning it thoroughly. Always store under cover in a dry place.

International Harvester Fertilizer Distributor

CLEANING.

The frequent and thorough cleaning of all fertilizer distributors is highly important due to the corrosive action of the fertilizers.

This is easily done before the fertilizer becomes dry and caked and it takes only a few minutes.

First of all remove agitator-feeder from the fertilizer box and clean the interior of the box thoroughly with a stiff brush.

THEN LOCK THE COVER and turn the machine upside down.

Unscrew the hand nuts and uncouple the pitmans from the feed plates by undoing the latches. Remove the lower bottom and the feed plates. Thoroughly clean the bottom and the various parts, which have been detached, with a stiff brush or a piece of wood. (See Fig. 10).

If the hand nuts are found difficult to unscrew use a wrench on the square neck. Do not use a hammer.

After replacing the feed plates and the lower bottom, and after tightening the hand nuts, turn the machine right side up.

To see that the pitmans and feed plates move freely, move the adjusting lever briskly up and down a few times.

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Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT