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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

John Deere Corn Binder

John Deere Corn Binder

Directions for Setting Up and Operating
John Deere Corn Binder

Back in the day, when you might have purchased this unit new, these set-up instructions would have been included to help you assemble the machine. The excellent drawings have helped many a subsequent owner to understand the binder and possibly diagnose any problem. Hope you find it useful. I may decide to run additional info in the next issue. But in any case, we are offering this as a new manual. LRM

John Deere Corn Binder

IMPORTANCE OF PROPERLY SETTING UP MACHINES

Practically all trouble with new machines is due to improper setting up and lack of lubrication.

THE PROPER METHOD

After unpacking and placing all parts where they will be handy, follow all of the directions carefully.

John Deere Corn BinderJohn Deere Corn Binder

The John Deere Corn Binder is set up as illustrated in the following pages. The darkened portions of the progressive illustrations show clearly the parts to be assembled and attached in proper order. Where the instructions or the connecting points are numbered, follow closely the order in which they are numbered and lettered. Arrows are also used to point out important adjustments or parts that need special attention in setting up.

When setting up Corn Binder block up main frame to get the main wheel off the ground. Before connecting any other parts, oil axles, main chain, sickle and pitman, clutch sprocket and all other bearings. Turn main wheel by hand with machine in and out of gear, making sure that all parts run smoothly. Owing to paint or damage in shipment, they may not move freely.

Thereafter, when any moving part is put on, turn it by hand after oiling freely. Be Sure to Tighten Bolts and Spread Cotters.

After binder attachment is in place, oil thoroughly and turn it by hand until it works smoothly. Grease lower discharge arm cam or track. After adjusting Packer Drive Chain, run machine by turning main wheel, and have all parts working freely and easily. Make no adjustments.

If at any time during this setting up you find you cannot move the parts freely, or when machine is finally completed it does not run as easily as it should, determine the cause by examining the last moving parts that were attached.

Use kerosene to cut the paint and good machine oil to lubricate all bearings. Never put a bearing together with the parts clogged with paint. It may take a little longer to set up a binder this way, but the results will be longer wear and better service.

John Deere Corn Binder

MAIN AND GRAIN WHEELS

1. (Figs. 1, 2 and 5.) Tip main frame on rear end. Remove lower stop bolt in sector. Set main wheel in place with raising crank over frame at same time placing rear end of main chain tightener bracket over main drive shaft box between clutch sprocket and oil chamber on top and between clutch sprocket and lug on bottom of box. Then put fork at front end of tightener over main wheel raising pinion. Oil raising mechanism. Turn raising and lowering crank until starting teeth on gears enter sectors. Gears must enter sectors evenly. Replace stop bolt in sector. Batter the threads to prevent bolt from losing out. Wire raising crank to main frame.

John Deere Corn Binder

2. Place a prop under right-hand side of main frame.

John Deere Corn Binder

3. (Figs. 1 and 3.) Attach grain wheel axle assembly. Remove bolts in outer axle bracket at “A” and loosen bolt at “B”. Insert axle into inner axle bracket and bolt outer axle bracket to main frame. Bolt support braces to outer axle bracket at “C” and “D”.

John Deere Corn Binder

4. (Fig. 4.) Slip grain wheel raising crank support post with link over raising crank and bolt support post to main frame.

5. (Fig. 1.) Attach grain wheel. Oil pipe to the inside. Grease axle and fill hub of wheel with grease. Washers go to each end of hub. Roller bearing is packed in twine can. Remove prop.

6. (Figs. 1 and 2.) Attach main chain (54 links type “D”) Hook end forward and open side out. Adjust tightener.

John Deere Corn Binder

7. (Fig. 1.) Raise butt pan and bolt pan raising lever to lever socket. Hand latch forward.

8. (Fig. 1.) Bolt butt rod to butt pan.

9. Screw oil pipe assembly into H320 inner gatherer drive shaft bushing. Oil pipe is shipped wired to main frame.

John Deere Corn Binder

BINDER ATTACHMENT

BE SURE BINDER IS LOCKED HOME BEFORE ATTACHING

1. Remove H1128 binder attachment support bar, inner, from main frame (See Fig. 7).

John Deere Corn Binder

2. With binder attachment home and butt pan raised to high position, lay attachment on floor or ground, tip main frame back as shown and bolt at “A”. Lift attachment into place and bolt at “B”, then at “C”. Binder support pipe at “C” goes to inside of main frame sill. Do not tighten bolts. Let front end of machine down and place a block or box under rear end of main frame.

3. (Fig. 7.) Bolt H1128 binder sup- port bar, inner, to binder frame — then bolt at “D” and “E” at same time hooking H1529 bevel and cam gear shield in hinges. DO NOT TIGHTEN BOLTS.

John Deere Corn Binder

4. (Fig. 6.) Bolt H1099 butt chain stripper to butt board, upper.

5. (Fig. 8.) H2022 lower bundle guide rod, inner, short corn attachment only.

John Deere Corn Binder

BINDER DECK

1. (Fig. 9.) Set deck in position — bolt loosely to binder frame at “A”, “B” and “C”. Do not attach deck extension top until outer gatherer is put on.

John Deere Corn Binder

REAR THROAT SIDE

1. Attach H1583, Rear throat side. First bolt to butt chain board. Small shield over cam gear bolts to inside of H1128 support bar at “F” (Fig. 7).

2. Bolt H1262 long corn or H2019 short corn, brace from binder frame to inner binder support bar.

3. Bolt H1173, lower stripper for lower discharge arm, flexible to discharge arm cam.

John Deere Corn Binder

RAISING CRANK SUPPORT AND CLUTCH THROW-OUT

1. Slip H1567 support over main wheel raising crank at “A”. Pass H2092 clutch shifter crank through H715 sector at “B” and through H1567 at “C”. Bolt at “D” and “E”.

2. Slip H2099 clutch shifter crank support over crank at “F” and bolt to main frame, as shown.

John Deere Corn Binder

3. (Fig. 12.) With H446 clutch shifter over H455 clutch collar, bolt clutch shifter to main frame as shown. Tighten bolt just enough so that shifter works freely. Secure nut with cotter.

4. Attach clutch shifter rod to clutch shifter and to clutch shifter crank. Adjust H350 link connection so that jaws of clutch clear 1/8” to 1/4” when clutch is out of gear. (See Fig. 12.)

John Deere Corn Binder

SECTOR BRACES

1. Attach sector braces, loosely. Bolts for top of braces are in inner gatherer.

2. (Figs. 6 and 7.) Tighten bolts in binder supports at “B”, “C”, “D” and “E”.

3. Bolt H1249, inner gatherer knuckle shield to butt chain board.

4. Attach H1578, upper stripper for flexible discharge arm — for regular or long corn attachment only. Be sure to secure H1578 stripper to breast plate support angle with hook bolt as shown at “A” Fig. 18.

John Deere Corn Binder

BREAST PLATE STRIPPER AND BUNDLE TOP DISCHARGE ARM

1. Attach H1894, breast plate stripper with brace. Brace hooks into eye in B133 knotter frame.

2. Bolt H1650 short corn attachment bundle top discharge arm to discharge arm socket.

John Deere Corn Binder

DECK THROAT SPRING

1. Insert front end of Deck Throat Spring into slotted hole at front end of deck, from the inside, then bolt deck spring to stiffener bar and deck, as shown.

2. Tighten deck bolts at “A”, “B”, and “C”, Fig. 9.

John Deere Corn Binder

INNER GATHERER

1. Assemble inner gatherer drive shaft upper with sprockets to inner gatherer, as shown. Hubs on sprockets must be up. Be sure that lug of bearing box sets down in groove of bearing box plate.

2. Tip binder up at front end and secure with prop.

3. Set inner gatherer in place with driven knuckle over drive knuckle. Bolt loosely at “A” and “B”.

John Deere Corn Binder

4. (Fig. 17.) Attach H1223 middle gatherer support. First bolt to board then drive lower end of support into position and bolt to inner gatherer angle.

5. (Figs. 17 and 18.) Bolt middle gatherer loosely in place. Be sure that stripper and retarding spring are swung to the rear.

John Deere Corn Binder

6. (Fig. 17.) Bolt H1266 inner gatherer brace rod to gatherer board and to main frame.

* 7. (Fig. 17.) Attach H1551 inner gatherer top chain with flat side of lug next to corn (38 links). Adjust chain tightener.

* 8. (Fig. 17.) Attach H1253 inner gatherer chain with flat side of lug next to corn (101 links). Adjust chain tightener carefully.

* 9. (Fig. 17.) Attach H1256 inner gatherer lower middle chain- with flat side of lug next to corn (60 links). Adjust chain tightener carefully.

10. (Fig. 17.) Bolt H91 inner gathering point to gatherer board and inner gatherer angle.

11. Tighten all bolts in middle and inner gatherers and any others that have not been tightened up to this time.

John Deere Corn Binder

OUTER GATHERER

1. (Fig. 20.) Bolt throat springs to outer gatherer angle (See instruction 7). Attach short spring first.

2. (Fig. 19.) Assemble drive sprockets and shaft to outer gatherer. Attach upper sprocket with hub up and lower sprocket with hub down, as shown.

3. (Figs. 19 and 20.) Secure H1247 top board rod to gatherer board.

4. (Fig. 19.) Bolt outer gatherer support bracket, rear with bent end down and out, to underside of gatherer board, as shown.

John Deere Corn Binder

5. (Fig. 20.) Set outer gatherer in place with driven knuckle over drive knuckle. Bolt at “A”, “B” and “C”. Swing gatherer supports up and bolt to gatherer board at “D” and “E”.

6. (Fig. 20.) Bolt twine can to lower support, then attach upper support brace, as shown.

7. Tighten all bolts.

* 8. Attach H1550, outer gatherer top chain (52 links). Adjust chain care- fully.

* 9. Attach H1252, outer gatherer chain (99 links). Adjust chain carefully.

10. Bolt H92, outer gathering point to gatherer board and outer gatherer angle.

11. Bolt H1734 fender stick to underside of lower, gatherer board. Put bolts in from top.

John Deere Corn Binder

PACKER DRIVE CHAIN

1. Put on packer drive chain. Adjust tightener and tighten bolt at “A”.

BOLTING INSTRUCTIONS FOR DECK OF REGULAR OR LONG CORN ATTACHMENT

John Deere Corn Binder

BOLTING INSTRUCTIONS FOR DECK OF SHORT CORN ATTACHMENT

John Deere Corn Binder

1. Bolt deck and extension top as illustrated by Figs. 22 or 23. Tighten bolts holding deck to binder frame.

2. H2027 for short corn attachment. This rod may also be used on the long or regular corn binder in short corn.

John Deere Corn Binder

BUNDLE GUIDE RODS AND SEAT

Note. If binder is used with power bundle carrier, put on carrier before bundle guide rods, seat and seat spring are attached.

1. Attach bundle guide rods. Be sure to bolt guide rod clips as shown.

2. Bolt seat spring bracket to main frame. Do not tighten bolts in bracket until Bundle Carrier Foot Lever Bearing is attached.

3. Attach seat and spring.

4. Tighten all bolts securely and spread cotters.

John Deere Corn Binder

BUNDLE TOP DISCHARGE ARM

1. Attach Bundle Top Discharge arm exactly as shown, with hook end of H2683 away from bundle being discharged. Used on Regular or Long Com Binder only.

John Deere Corn Binder

SHIELD FOR CLUTCH SHIFTER LEVER LINK

For binders without bundle carriers. Bolt H2891 shield to rear of main frame as shown.

SETTING OF LEAD TONGUE AND TRANSPORTATION HOOK

John Deere Corn Binder

TRANSPORT RIM FOR SPADE LUG WHEEL

John Deere Corn Binder

TONGUE TRUCK AND 3-HORSE HITCH

John Deere Corn Binder

1. Figs. 27-29. Assemble tongue truck and attach to corn binder.

2. Attach tilting lever.

3. Bolt tool box to truck frame.

4-HORSE STRUNG OUT HITCH (Used with Tongue Truck)

John Deere Corn BinderJohn Deere Corn Binder

3-HORSE POLE ATTACHMENT

John Deere Corn Binder

1. Attach pole and eveners to corn binder.

2. Attach tilting lever. (See instructions on Fig. 30 for position.)

3. Secure tool box to top of pole with screws found in pole.

2-HORSE POLE ATTACHMENT

John Deere Corn Binder

POWER BUNDLE CARRIER

John Deere Corn Binder

1. Bolt H4274, support beam hook to outside of main frame.

2. Bolt H4283, support beam bracket to main frame, and place HZ7089 trunnion and bolt in position shown.

John Deere Corn Binder

3. Pin and cotter carrier drive shaft to main drive shaft of corn binder. Be sure to spread cotter through H535 coupling and pin.

4. (Fig. 39.) Bolt knuckle drive shield to inside of main frame.

5. (Fig. 37.) Bolt H4125 shield to rear of main frame sill.

John Deere Corn Binder

6. (Fig. 39.) Secure support beam in carrier, with large Plate at rear end of beam.

7. (Fig. 38.) Bolt H2784 idler shaft shield rod bracket to bundle carrier side. Bracket goes between carrier side and bundle carrier support.

8. (Fig. 38.) Remove cotter in main frame bolt, at which bundle support attaches.

John Deere Corn Binder

9. (Fig. 39.) To attach carrier. Slip steel support at inner end of carrier over main frame bolt (See Fig. 38) at same time setting support beam in brackets; also slipping drive shaft into clutch as shown (Fig. 39). Secure beam with bolt through bracket — Be sure HZ7089 trunnion is in place on R.H. or inner side of support beam.

10. (Fig. 38.) Replace cotter in main frame bolt. Support goes between cotter and nut.

11. (Figs. 38 and 39.) Hook hinged shield rod in idler shaft shield bracket H2784, then hook rear bracket on rear sideboard onto shield rod and bolt rear side- board to carrier.

John Deere Corn Binder

12. (Fig. 39.) Bolt front sideboard to carrier. H4126 shield goes to outside of steel throat side.

13. (Figs. 40 and 41.) Hook clutch shifter rod “A” into clutch shifter as shown, then pin and cotter bell crank at “B” (Fig. 41) and bolt foot lever at “C” Fig. 40.

14. (Fig. 40.) Attach foot treadle strap.

John Deere Corn Binder

15. (Fig. 42.) Hook H4121 bundle carrier support rod into bracket on rear side of carrier, then cotter upper end of rod to support bracket on binder frame, as shown.

Now, go over entire machine to be sure that all parts are properly attached and that all nuts are tight and cotters spread.

John Deere Corn Binder

FINGER BUNDLE CARRIER

1. (Fig. 44.) Remove rear inner bolt, securing center cross sill and main frame.

John Deere Corn Binder

2. (Fig. 44.) Bolt upper support rod loosely to front hole of breast plate support angle lug on binder frame.

3. (Fig. 44.) Bolt lower support rod to bundle carrier support, loosely.

4. (Figs. 44 and 45.) Set bundle carrier in position, with hook of bundle carrier support bracket to underside of main frame. Bolt bracket to main frame at center cross sill where short bolt at “1” was removed. Hook upper support rod into bundle carrier adjusting bracket.

John Deere Corn Binder

5. (Fig. 44.) Bolt lower support rod to outside of main frame.

6. (Figs. 44 and 45.) Hook return spring in hook on bundle carrier pipe crank and secure rod on upper end of return spring to binder frame at bolt that attaches discharge arm cam, as shown.

7. Tighten all bolts.

John Deere Corn Binder

8. (Fig. 46.) Bolt foot dump crank to main frame cross sill, front as shown.

9. (Figs. 44 and 46.) Insert trip rod between sector and sector brace, then hook trip rod over bundle carrier pipe crank and cotter to foot dump crank. Trip rod hooks in foot dump crank from the inside, as shown.

10. (Fig. 43.) Deck Spring bolts to inside of deck and stiffener bar between deck and binder frame. Bundle Guide Rods may be bent if necessary to properly guide bundles into carrier.

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Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT