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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

John Deere Model HH Spreader

John Deere Model HH SpreaderJohn Deere Model HH Spreader

John Deere Model HH Spreader

OPERATION

Check the adjustments on your spreader and make sure they are in proper operating condition. Hitch your team to the empty spreader to limber it up and see that it is working properly before loading.

Always be sure that the feed lever is in neutral position when you start to load. In freezing weather, before loading, make sure that the apron is not frozen to the bed.

It is easier on your spreader if you start loading at the front end. Never load higher than the gauge bar. Heavy manure and soft ground will, naturally, effect the draft.

If you will turn the beaters over by hand before starting to the field, the spreader will start easier and will prevent throwing out a large bunch of manure when starting.

Always stop the spreader before throwing the beaters in gear.

After the beaters have started, throw the feed lever into the notch in which you wish to spread. If an endgate is used, be sure to raise it before starting to spread.

When making a turn, while spreading, put the feed lever in neutral.

To prevent excessive driving to unload the last part of the load, you can stop the beaters and leave the feed engaged until the spreader is empty.

When using lime spread attachment, load only about one ton of lime at a time, or up to the gauge line painted on the beater cover: Regulate the quantity spread by the feed lever the same as you would for manure.

When using the endgate attachment, be sure the feed lever is in neutral before lowering endgate. Also, be sure to raise endgate before moving feed lever when you start unloading.

When not in use the spreader should be sheltered.

LUBRICATION

Before using this spreader, see that it has been greased thoroughly. There are 20 Zerk fittings. Form the habit of counting them so as not to overlook any bearings. Their locations are:-

RIGHT SIDE
1 Upper beater bearing
1 Lower beater bearing
1 Widespread bearing
1 Rear axle bearing
1 Rear apron shaft bearing
2 Front axle spindles
1 Sprocket in drive chain frame
1 Front wheel hub

LEFT SIDE
1 Widespread bearing
1 Upper beater bearing
1 Lower beater bearing
1 Rear axle bearing
1 Rear apron shaft bearing
2 Front axle spindles
2 Ratchet case bearings
1 Front wheel hub
1 Tightener sprocket-drive chain to widespread

Oil the two front apron sprockets.

Spreader should be greased every day it is in use, and twice a day when in continuous use with manure loader.

Do not put more than one-half pint of oil in gear case. Check occasionally with the lower plug and add oil as needed. Use S.A.E. 20 for winter season and S.A.E. 40 in summer.

Use oil on all chains. The main drive chain is a high grade chain; it should be cleaned occasionally before oiling.

When a lime spread attachment is being used, grease all bearings oftener than you would when spreading manure. This will also keep the lime from getting into the bearings.

TIRE INFLATION

Inflate 6.00 x 16” tires to 28 pounds.

SERVICING

After spreading about 10 loads, adjust the chain tighteners on chain driving the widespread and the apron chains. See Figure 1.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

The conveyor chain may be tightened by loosening the two nuts holding the front sprocket brackets and pushing the bracket forward. It is not necessary for this chain to be tight. See Figure 2.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

After using the spreader continuously for some time, end play may develop in the rear axle, which may throw the main drive sprocket out of line with the drive chain. This can be corrected by the use of No. 3849 SC washers on the rear axle, placed as needed, to insure proper alignment.

When end play in the upper beater becomes too much for the adjustable washers to take up, put No. 4776 SC steel washers next to bearings.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

SETTING UP DIRECTIONS

1. Unpack the bed bundle and place on a sawhorse 20” high about 6” behind the front angle girt.

2. Place the rear sawhorse just in front of the axle housing on the underside of bed. Empty the sack of hardware on the bed, also all bolts used in packing, and group the different sizes.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Remove all the parts from the axle and put it through the axle housing.

2. Replace both bearings, No. 5062 SC goes on the right side. Put on the steel washers, then the half-moon keys. Put a straight Zerk fitting in both bearings.

3. Remove these strips from the bottom edge of the right and left sides and insert between the bed and axle housing. Be sure to have the straight edge to the outside.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Put on the right side. Bolt loosely.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

2. Bolt on side braces (loosely). Be careful to bolt them to the wide side of angles as shown by shaded parts in Figure 6.

Side braces are made to fit tight and furnish support to spreader sides. Do not file holes for easier assembly.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Put up the left side and insert only a 1/2” machine bolt through the front bed angle to hold the side in position.

2. Place the lower beater in position (the keyseat nearer the end of shaft must be on the right side). Then put in the upper beater.

3. Remove from the spiral beater, only the sprocket and cotter key from the left side bearing, then put the beater in position.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Bolt loosely the left side and braces to the bed. Side braces are made to fit tight and furnish support to spreader sides. DO NOT FILE HOLES FOR EASIER ASSEMBLY.

2. Put on the arch anglebolt loosely. Put in the front dashbolt tightly. Now tighten all the bolts in the bed, sides and arch angle.

3. Replace the washer and sprocket, also the cotter keys and put grease fittings in both bearings.

4. Replace bearings, steel washers, half-moon keys, and sprockets. Screw a 67-1/2 degree elbow grease fitting in the left bearing and a straight fitting in the right bearing.

5. Replace the bearings and screw in grease fittings, then put a steel washer on the right side, then a half-moon key, sprocket and cotter key. Drive all end-play to the left side. Put steel washer, then the adjustable washer and cotter key on the left side.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Bolt the stop pawl bracket assembly to the side.

2. Put the cam on axle.

3. Put grease fittings in the conveyor shaft bearings and hub of the ratchet case.

Place the shaft under the bed. (If there is no help around, put a block support under the right end of shaft about 10” high.)

4. Now put pawl spring in place; be sure the upper end is on the teat, raise the pawl to hold spring in place.

Raise the shaft assembly (3) and slip the pawl inside the case and over the top of the ratchet wheel.

Block assembly firmly in position and bolt the left bearing to sill and cross angle. Use double nuts on bolts and be sure they are tight.

Now bolt on the right bearing, leaving the cotter key in the end of the shaft.

5. Hook the spring to ratchet case and underneath sill.

6. Put on drive chain and tightener. The hook end of links in lower strand must run toward the front.

7. Attach the feed rod to the stop lever.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Put the pawl holder on axle up against bearing. Be sure to grease pawls.

2. Bolt drive sprocket firmly to pawl holder.

3. Bolt throw-out bracket to side.

4. Put guide bar through loop on throw-out frame and bolt guide bar to side.

5. Attach long throwout rod to throw-out frame.

6. Install spring.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Put a bar in throw-out frame with the end against bolt to stretch spring enough to be able to put drive chain on upper beater sprocket. Grease axle, put on wheel, take up all end play on axle with notched washers.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Bolt brackets for hand levers to sides. Put hand levers through ratchet plates. Bolt levers to brackets with 1/4” pipe ferrule on bolts, then lever, then a thick steel washer, then a lock washer and nut.

2. Bolt brackets to cover.

3. Bolt footrest angles to brackets.

4. Bolt seat bracket to front of cover.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Bolt front hood to sides and dash.

2. Assemble seat and spring to spreader.

3. Adjust the clevis on throw-out rod so when hand lever is upright, there will be at least 3-3/4” clearance between the main drive chain and closest tooth of drive sprocket, or 1/4” between drive sprocket and tightener sprocket when hand lever is down.

Adjust the clevis on the feed control rod until about 1” is through the clevis, connect to handle when it is set in upright position. Turn the rear wheel to see if the roller clears the cam on axle about 3/4”. Then move feed lever to next notch and turn the wheel which should cause the dog inside case to click once and four clicks when lever is at the bottom notch.

Now set the nuts tight on the clevis.

4. Place front axle assembly in position for putting on wheels.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Remove caps from wheels.

2. See that the felt washer is in the wheel hub before putting them on axles.

3. Then put on roller bearings, spacing washers, etc., in the same order as in cut.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Attach pole socket.

2. Put steering rods in axle arms.

Put the 4244 SC cast bushing through rod ends with flange on top. Bolt to pole socket with steel washer under rod ends next to square nut. The curved lock nut should be set up tight on the square nut.

3. Put in four Zerk fittings in top and bottom axle spindle bearings.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Roll the front truck assembly under box and put in the rear· bolt on both sides.

Now remove both sawhorses from under spreader box, to finish bolting the front end.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Complete bolting the frame to box.

2. Bolt guard for conveyor shaft to rear end of bed.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Bolt on chain tighteners loosely. Grease the two idler sprockets and all of the 20 Zerk oilers.

OIL RATCHET CASE

Put about one-half pint of oil in the case for the ratchet wheel. Use S.A.E. 20 for winter season and S.A.E. 40 for summer season.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Put the conveyor chain in spreader so the upright leg of angle slats are toward the beaters.

2. Thread chains around the sprockets and couple chains underneath bed.

3. Bolt on the support slides.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

Bolt guard to left side.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

Bolt guard to right side.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

ENDGATE ATTACHMENT

1. Put on left standard with pawl to outside, using the longer bolts through arch angle.

Bolt on right standard.

2. Remove crank rod from apron chains.

Put ratchet wheel assembly on crank rod and pin in place.

Slide crank rod through left standard, apron chains, and right standard. Fasten with cotter key.

3. Bolt angle slides, with curved end up, to inside of box.

4. Attach endgate rod with guide as indicated. Bend rod as shown so it will not interfere with loading.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Bolt hand lever in place and attach the operating rod.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

LIME SPREAD ATTACHMENT

1. Unpack the pan and bolt the hangers to the spreader bed, as in Figure 24.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

2. Attach blades to the beater bars. Hook the blades under the edge of the beater bars and bolt clips over beater teeth.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

3. Bolt the curved angles to sides.

4. Bolt the cover sheet to the curved angle.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

Bolt the steel flap to the inside bottom edge of the front dash board. This flap should cover the opening where the apron chain comes up around the front end.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

TRACTOR HITCH POLE

1. Attach to pole socket as illustrated.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

BRAKE ATTACHMENT

1. Attach outer bearing for foot lever.

2. Put foot lever through outer bearing and inner bracket, then bolt inner bracket to foot board.

3. Put on foot treadle and attach ratchet plate to foot board.

4. Attach clevis and brake rod.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Bolt brake band bracket to spreader sill.

2. Bolt brake drum to wheel.

3. Bolt brake rod guide to side of spreader.

John Deere Model HH Spreader

1. Attach brake band to brake drum and put on brake band lever.

2. Replace wheel on axle, sliding lever arm over stud on brake band bracket.

3. Connect brake rod to lever.

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Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT