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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

Directions for Setting Up and Operating

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

DERRICK TRUCK ASSEMBLY

Assemble the derrick truck, telescoping the reach, to adjust the wheel base as required, according to the length of elevator:

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

A) 22- TO 28-FOOT ELEVATORS

  • Truck wheel base 12 ft.
  • Place lifting bail bar at center of third section.
  • Bar for guy wires back of reel brackets on boot section.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

B) 30- TO 38-FOOT ELEVATORS

  • Truck wheel base from 12 to 17 ft., depending on length of elevator.
  • Place lifting bail bar at a point which will allow derrick poles to stand nearly perpendicular, but never forward past center.
  • Bar for guy wires back of reel brackets or moved farther forward if lifting bail bar is moved forward.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

C) 40- TO 50-FOOT ELEVATORS

  • Always use the wide truck with 21 ft. derrick poles. Truck wheel base at 19 ft.
  • Place lifting bail bar at lower end of fifth section.
  • Put bar for guy wires at center of the screen or second section.

TO SET UP TRUCK AND ELEVATOR SECTIONS

  • Lay derrick and guy-wires back of rear axle.
  • Loosen setscrews and spread castings on square rod above front axle.
  • Lay boot section on truck. Put pivot lugs in shifting castings, fasten with spring cotters.
  • Move shifter arm on square rod as close to elevator as possible, set both setscrews tight.
  • Connect the perforated end of second section to the boot section using bolts in place. Be sure that upper trough of boot section overlaps the second section on top, with the lower trough overlapping underneath.
  • Bolt short splice plates to underside of troughs using buttonhead elevator bolts.
  • If elevator is to be used for small grain — cover screen with sheet provided. Attach other intermediate sections in like manner.
  • Attach head section as prescribed for intermediate sections. The scroll sheet in the head section must lap under the upper trough.
  • Loosen tightener screws in head section.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

REEL AND DERRICK

  • Attach reel brackets to center of boot section — with crank to the left.
  • Put in chain and slats with hook end of links forward.
  • Attach lifting bail underneath grain trough in proper location as outlined in Figs. A, B, and C.
  • Put derrick over elevator with crosshead over boot section.
  • Attach guy-wires to bar under grain trough at a point which will allow the derrick to stand nearly perpendicular, as outlined in Figs. A, B, and C.
  • Caution: The derrick must in all cases be nearly perpendicular with a slight slant toward Receiving Hopper. If derrick pipes slant in the opposite direction they are subject to excessive strains.
  • Attach tackle block with double eye to bail and the other tackle block to crosshead of derrick.
  • Pass end of cable under cable roll and attach with hook bolt.
  • Raise Elevator so boot will rest on the ground.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

No. 1014 SWINGING RECEIVING HOPPER

  • Bolt on supports for swivel-drive jack, as shown.
  • Attach double-chain tightener to right support.
  • Lay drive jack in position and fasten with cotter keys.
  • Put on drive chain with hook end of links forward in the direction of chain travel.
  • Attach chain guards as shown.
  • The drop side of hopper can be used on either side.
  • Use 12T sprocket for ear-corn and 10T sprocket for shelled corn and small grain.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

No. 1388 RAISING RECEIVING HOPPER

  • A. Bolt side plates to boot section.

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Spotlight On: Farming Systems & Approaches

The Forcing of Plants

The Forcing of Plants

by:
from issue:

It is always advisable to place coldframes and hotbeds in a protected place, and particularly to protect them from cold north winds. Buildings afford excellent protection, but the sun is sometimes too hot on the south side of large and light-colored buildings. One of the best means of protection is to plant a hedge of evergreens. It is always desirable, also, to place all the coldframes and hotbeds close together, for the purpose of economizing time and labor.

Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 1

Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 1

I am certainly not the most able of dairymen, nor the most skilled among vegetable growers, and by no means am I to be counted amongst the ranks of the master teamsters of draft horses. If there is anything remarkable about my story it is that someone could know so little about farming as I did when I started out and still manage to make a good life of it.

Swallow

Rotation As A Means Of Blight Control

Every farmer knows that when a crop is grown on the same field year after year, it becomes inferior in quality and the yield steadily diminishes.

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

We were inspired to try no-tilling vegetables into cover crops after attending the Groffs’ field day in 1996. No-tilling warm season vegetables has proved problematic at our site due to the mulch of cover crop residues keeping the soil too cool and attracting slugs. We thought that no-tilling garlic into this cover crop of oats and Canadian field peas might be the ticket as garlic seems to appreciate being mulched.

The Way To The Farm

Lise Hubbe stops mid-furrow at plowing demonstration for Evergreen State College students. She explains that the plow was going too deep…

Starting Your Farm

Starting Your Farm: Chapter 3

What goes with the sale? What does not? Do not assume the irrigation pipe and portable hen houses are selling. Find out if they go with the deal, and in writing.

Horse Labor Instead of Tractors

Horse Labor Instead of Tractors

by:
from issue:

Three different parcels of land were committed for a series of tests to directly compare the impact of tractors and horses on the land. One side of each parcel was worked only with horses and the other only with tractors. There were measurable differences between each side of the worked areas; the land’s capacity to hold water and greater aeration were up to 45cm higher in areas worked by horses as opposed to tractors.

English Sheaf Knots

English Sheaf Knots

Long ago when grain was handled mostly by hand, the crop was cut slightly green so seed did not shatter or shake loose too easily. That crop was then gathered into ‘bundles’ or ‘sheafs’ and tied sometimes using a handful of the same grain for the cording. These sheafs were then gathered together, heads up, and leaned upon one another to form drying shocks inviting warm breezes to pass through. In old England, the field workers took great pride in their work and distinctive sheaf knots were designed and employed.

Cultivating Questions: Alternative Tillage & Inter-Seeding Techniques

Our intention is not to advocate the oddball living mulches we use with this single row inter-seeding system, but just to show how it is possible to utilize the between-row areas to improve insect habitat, reduce erosion, conserve moisture, fix some nitrogen, and grow a good bit of extra organic matter. If nothing else, experimenting with these alternative practices continues to keep farming exciting as we begin our twentieth season of bio-extensive market gardening.

Sustainable Forestry

Sustainable Forestry

by:
from issue:

After 70 plus years of industrial logging, the world’s forests are as degraded and diminished as its farmlands, or by some estimates even more so. And this is a big problem for all of us, because the forests of the world do much more than supply lumber, Brazil nuts, and maple syrup. Farmlands produce food, a basic need to be sure, but forests are responsible for protecting and purifying the air, water and soil which are even more basic.

Rice as a New Staple Crop for Very Cold Climates

Rice as a New Staple Crop for Very Cold Climates

by: ,
from issue:

If you were visiting Earth from some other planet and had to describe its inhabitants upon your return, you might say that the average person eats rice, and grows it as well, usually on a small scale. You’d be accurately describing the habits of over a quarter of the world’s population. Rice has a special story with an exciting chapter now unfolding in the northeast USA among a small but growing group of farmers and growers.

Russian Dacha Gardening

Russian Dacha Gardens

by:
from issue:

Russian household agriculture – dacha gardening – is likely the most extensive system of successful food production of any industrialized nation. This shows that highly decentralized, small-scale food production is not only possible, but practical on a national scale and in a geographically large and diverse country with a challenging climate for growing. Most of the USA has far more than the 110 days average growing season that Russia has.

A Short History of the Horse-Drawn Mower

A Short History of the Horse-Drawn Mower

Book Excerpt: The enclosed gear, late model John Deere, Case, Oliver, David Bradley, and McCormick Deering International mowers I (we) are so fond of had a zenith of popular manufacture and use that lasted just short of 25 years. Millions of farmers with millions of mowers, built to have a serviceable life of 100 plus years, all pushed into the fence rows. I say, it was far too short of a period.

Barnyard Manure

Barnyard Manure

by:
from issue:

The amount of manure produced must be considered in planning a cropping system for a farm. If one wishes to manure one-fifth of the land every year with 10 tons per acre, there would have to be provided two tons per year for each acre of the farm. This would require about one cow or horse, or equivalent, for each six acres of land.

LittleField Notes Fall 2011

LittleField Notes: Fall 2011

by:
from issue:

There is a certain set of skills and knowledge that tend to fall through the cracks of your average farm how-to book. Books of a more specialized nature are also abundant but often seem to take a fairly simple subject and make it seem daunting in scope and detail. What follows are a few tidbits of knowledge that I have found useful over the years – the little things that will inevitably need to be learned at some point in the farmer education process.

Evolution of a Permanent Bed System

Evolution of a Permanent Bed System

by:
from issue:

After three or four years we could see that the nature of our farming practices would continue to have detrimental effects on our soils. We were looking for a new approach, a routine that would be sustainable, rather than a rescue treatment for an ongoing problem. We decided to convert our fields to permanent planting beds with grassy strips in between where all tractor, foot and irrigation pipe traffic would be concentrated.

Wheel Hoe

The Wheel Hoe: A Tool For Shallow Tillage

When we bought this little farm I soon realized I needed a wheel hoe. The size of the horse and tractor dictated space wasting wide rows in crop production and, to some degree, so does my two wheeled tractor.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT