Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

Directions for Setting Up and Operating

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

DERRICK TRUCK ASSEMBLY

Assemble the derrick truck, telescoping the reach, to adjust the wheel base as required, according to the length of elevator:

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

A) 22- TO 28-FOOT ELEVATORS

  • Truck wheel base 12 ft.
  • Place lifting bail bar at center of third section.
  • Bar for guy wires back of reel brackets on boot section.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

B) 30- TO 38-FOOT ELEVATORS

  • Truck wheel base from 12 to 17 ft., depending on length of elevator.
  • Place lifting bail bar at a point which will allow derrick poles to stand nearly perpendicular, but never forward past center.
  • Bar for guy wires back of reel brackets or moved farther forward if lifting bail bar is moved forward.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

C) 40- TO 50-FOOT ELEVATORS

  • Always use the wide truck with 21 ft. derrick poles. Truck wheel base at 19 ft.
  • Place lifting bail bar at lower end of fifth section.
  • Put bar for guy wires at center of the screen or second section.

TO SET UP TRUCK AND ELEVATOR SECTIONS

  • Lay derrick and guy-wires back of rear axle.
  • Loosen setscrews and spread castings on square rod above front axle.
  • Lay boot section on truck. Put pivot lugs in shifting castings, fasten with spring cotters.
  • Move shifter arm on square rod as close to elevator as possible, set both setscrews tight.
  • Connect the perforated end of second section to the boot section using bolts in place. Be sure that upper trough of boot section overlaps the second section on top, with the lower trough overlapping underneath.
  • Bolt short splice plates to underside of troughs using buttonhead elevator bolts.
  • If elevator is to be used for small grain — cover screen with sheet provided. Attach other intermediate sections in like manner.
  • Attach head section as prescribed for intermediate sections. The scroll sheet in the head section must lap under the upper trough.
  • Loosen tightener screws in head section.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

REEL AND DERRICK

  • Attach reel brackets to center of boot section — with crank to the left.
  • Put in chain and slats with hook end of links forward.
  • Attach lifting bail underneath grain trough in proper location as outlined in Figs. A, B, and C.
  • Put derrick over elevator with crosshead over boot section.
  • Attach guy-wires to bar under grain trough at a point which will allow the derrick to stand nearly perpendicular, as outlined in Figs. A, B, and C.
  • Caution: The derrick must in all cases be nearly perpendicular with a slight slant toward Receiving Hopper. If derrick pipes slant in the opposite direction they are subject to excessive strains.
  • Attach tackle block with double eye to bail and the other tackle block to crosshead of derrick.
  • Pass end of cable under cable roll and attach with hook bolt.
  • Raise Elevator so boot will rest on the ground.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

No. 1014 SWINGING RECEIVING HOPPER

  • Bolt on supports for swivel-drive jack, as shown.
  • Attach double-chain tightener to right support.
  • Lay drive jack in position and fasten with cotter keys.
  • Put on drive chain with hook end of links forward in the direction of chain travel.
  • Attach chain guards as shown.
  • The drop side of hopper can be used on either side.
  • Use 12T sprocket for ear-corn and 10T sprocket for shelled corn and small grain.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

No. 1388 RAISING RECEIVING HOPPER

  • A. Bolt side plates to boot section.

SmallFarmersJournal.com is a live, ever-changing subscription website. To gain access to all the content on this site, subscribe for just $5 per month. If you are not completely satisfied, cancel at any time. Here at your own convenience you can access past articles from Small Farmer's Journal's first forty years and all of the brand new content of new issues. You will also find posts of complete equipment manuals, a wide assortment of valuable ads, a vibrant events calendar, and up to the minute small farm news bulletins. The site features weather forecasts for your own area, moon phase calendaring for farm decisions, recipes, and loads of miscellaneous information.

Spotlight On: Equipment & Facilities

Homemade Ground-Drive PTO Forecart

Homemade Ground-Drive PTO Forecart

by:
from issue:

As we start, consider a few things when building a pto cart. Are big drive tires necessary? Is a lot of weight needed? Imagine the cart in use. Try to see it working where you normally go and where you almost never go. Will it be safe and easy to mount or dismount? Can you access the controls of the implement conveniently? Is it easy to hook and unhook? Where is the balance point? I’m sure you will think of other details as you daydream about it.

Champion No.4 Mower Reaper

The Champion No. 4 Combined Mower and Self-Raking Reaper

by:
from issue:

The project for the winter of 2010 was a Champion No. 4 mower made sometime around 1878 by the Champion Machine Works of Springfield, Ohio. The machine was designed primarily as a mower yet for an additional charge a reaping attachment could be added. The mower was in remarkably good condition for its age. After cleaning dirt from gears and oiling, we put the machine on blocks and found that none of the parts were frozen and everything moved.

Shoeing Stocks

An article from the out-of-print Winter 1982 Issue of SFJ.

Delivery Wagon Plans

Delivery Wagon Plans

from issue:

While the low down delivery wagon is an improvement, the objectionable features are increased. But with all those objections the low down wagons increase every year. Their convenience outweighs all other objections. They are handy for country delivery and are fitted up inside to suit either grocers, bakers, butchers or milk delivery, or a combination of the four.

Barn Raising

Barn Raising

by:
from issue:

Here it was like a beehive with too many fuzzy cheeked teen-agers who couldn’t possibly be experienced enough to be of much help. But work was being accomplished; bents, end walls and partitions were being assembled like magic and raised into place with well-coordinated, effortless ease and precision. No tempers were flaring, no egomaniacs were trying to steal the show, and there was not the usual ten percent doing ninety percent of the work.

Walsh No Buckle Harness

from issue:

When first you become familiar with North American working harness you might come to the erroneous conclusion that, except for minor style variations, all harnesses are much the same. While quality and material issues are accounting for substantive differences in the modern harness, there were also interesting and important variations back in the early twentieth century which many of us today either have forgotten or never knew about. Perhaps the most significant example is the Walsh No Buckle Harness.

Sleds

Sleds

by:
from issue:

The remainder of this section on Agricultural Implements is about homemade equipment for use with draft animals. These implements are all proven and serviceable. They are easily worked by a single animal weighing 1,000 pounds, and probably a good deal less. Sleds rate high on our homestead. They can be pulled over rough terrain. They do well traversing slopes. Being low to the ground, they are very easy to load up.

Geiss New-Made Hay Loader

Gies’ New-Made Hayloader

by:
from issue:

I was sitting on a 5 gallon bucket staring at the hayloader. I had a significant amount of time and money invested. My wife, the great motivating influence in my life, walked up and asked what I was thinking. I was thinking about dropping the whole project and I told her so. She told me that it had better work since I had spent so much money and time on it already. She doesn’t talk that way very often so I figured I had better come up with a solution.

Building a Community, Building a Barn

Building a Community, Building a Barn

by:
from issue:

One of the most striking aspects of this development is the strength and confidence that comes from this communal way of living. While it is impressive to build a barn in a day it seems even more impressive to imagine building four barns or six, and all the rest of the needs of a community. For these young Amish families the vision of a shared agricultural community is strong, and clear.

"Work Horse Handbook, 2nd Edition" by Lynn Miller

Draft Collars and How To Size Them

It is difficult to accurately measure a horse’s neck without fitting. In other words, there are so many variables involved in the shape and size of a horse’s neck that the only accurate and easy way to size the neck is to use several collars and put them on one at a time until fitting is found.

Work Horse Handbook

The Work Horse Handbook

The decision to depend on horses or mules in harness for farm work, logging, or highway work is an important one and should not be taken lightly. Aside from romantic notions of involvement in a picturesque scene, most of the considerations are serious.

Horse Powered Snow Fencing and Sleigh Fencing

Horse Powered Snow Fencing and Sleigh Fencing

by:
from issue:

We were planning on having our cattle out in a sheltered field for the winter but a busy fall and early snows meant our usual fencing tool was going to be ineffective. Through the grazing season we use a reel barrow which allows us to carry posts and pay out or take in wire with a wheel barrow like device which works really well. But not on snow. This was the motivation for turning our sleigh into a “snow fencer” or a “sleigh barrow”.

Box Jaw Tongs & the Cow Poop Theory of Blacksmithing

Box Jaw Tongs & the Cow Poop Theory of Blacksmithing

by:
from issue:

Making a pair of tongs was a milestone for a lot of blacksmiths. In times gone past a Journeyman Smith meant just that, a smith that went upon a journey to learn more skills before taking a masters test. When the smith appeared at the door of a prospective employer, he/she would be required to demonstrate their skills. A yard stick for this was to make a pair of tongs.

Haying With Horses

Haying With Horses

If the reader is considering the construction of a barn we encourage you to give more than passing thought to allowing the structure of the gable to be open enough to accommodate the hanging of a trolley track. It is difficult or impossible to retrofit a truss-built barn, which may have many supports crisscrossing the inside gable, to receive hay jags. At least allowing for the option in a new construction design will leave the option for loose hay systems in the future.

Cultivating Questions The Cost of Working Horses

Cultivating Questions: The Cost of Working Horses

Thanks to the many resources available in the new millennium, it is relatively easy for new and transitioning farmers to learn the business of small-scale organic vegetable production. Economic models of horse-powered market gardens, however, are still few and far between. To fill that information hole, I asked three experienced farmers to join me in tracking work horse hours, expenses and labor over a two-year period and to share the results in the Small Farmer’s Journal.

LittleField Notes Spring 2013

LittleField Notes: Spring 2013

by:
from issue:

If we agree that quality of plowing is subject to different criteria at different times and in different fields, then perhaps the most important thing to consider is control. How effectively can I plow to attain my desired field condition based on my choice of plow? The old time plow manufacturers understood this. At one time there were specific moldboards available for every imaginable soil type and condition.

Fjordworks Plowing the Market Garden

Fjordworks: Plowing the Market Garden Part 1

In a horse-powered market garden in the 1- to 10-acre range the moldboard plow can still serve us very well as one valuable component within a whole tool kit of tillage methods. In the market garden the plow is used principally to turn in crop residue or cover crops with the intention of preparing the ground to sow new seeds. In these instances, the plow is often the most effective tool the horse-powered farmer has on hand for beginning the process of creating a fine seed bed.

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

John Deere Portable Bridge-Trussed Grain Elevator

from issue:

When bolting the sections of elevator together be sure the upper trough ends overlap the upper trough ahead, and each lower trough is underneath the trough ahead, so the chains will slide smoothly. Bolt the short tie plates to the underside of troughs at the embossed holes in the middle of trough. When bolting on the head section, have the end of scroll sheet underneath the upper trough section. The lower cross plate in the head section must bolt on top of the return trough.

Journal Guide