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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No. 594

This material comes straight out of the John Deere manual for this model. After several decades of usage and familiarity with ground-drive hay rakes I have settled on this outfit as my favorite. I have four John Deeres all alike, with two being parts rakes.

(I do also have a good New Idea with the handy option of reversing the action in order to tedd. Only feature I wish my JDs had.)

I appreciate the wholly accessible design and construction of the John Deere Side Delivery rakes. Simply put, I can work on mine. My buddy Ed Joseph just rebuilt his completely and can’t stop talking about how quiet and sweet working she is.

This material featured a whole bunch of assembly pictures which have been useful to me when trying to fix something so I’ve left them in for you. If you have a make and model of rake you prefer to pull behind your horses (or even behind an old tractor) let us know. Perhaps we can dig up some info on it. LRM

OPERATION AND ADJUSTMENTS

Before starting the John Deere Side-Delivery Rake, make sure that all bolts are tight, cotter pins are spread, and machine has been properly set up.

Be sure to fill gear case with the proper grade of oil and lubricate as shown in lubrication chart.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

When starting a new side rake, turn the reel by hand to be sure it revolves freely and the teeth do not strike the stripper bars. Then throw the rake in gear and turn the wheel by hand to see that the tooth bars and gears run free. Breakage of parts, which causes serious delay and additional expense, can be avoided by taking these precautions before entering the field.

An occasional thorough inspection for loose nuts, worn bolts, and other parts will add to the efficiency of your rake.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TOOTH-ADJUSTING LEVER

The most important adjustment is the angle of the teeth in relation to the surface of the ground. This adjustment regulates the raking of the teeth for loose or tight windrows.

Under average conditions the normal position for the tooth-adjusting lever will be in the center of the rack, at Notch 3. Moving the lever to the rear toward Notches 4 and 5 increases the forward angle of the teeth to produce a loose, fluffy windrow. Moving the lever forward toward Notches 1 and 2, will decrease the tooth angle to produce a tighter windrow. The Sixth Notch is used when transporting rake.

FRONT LIFTING LEVER

The teeth should always be set as high as possible and still pick up all the hay. This setting causes the teeth to pitch the hay into loose windrows permitting free circulation of air. A trial in the center notch of the Front Lifting Lever will give an indication as to the position in which it should be set.

REAR LIFTING LEVER

The Rear Lifting Lever is properly set when the rear end of the reel is slightly higher than the front end. This aids in making the windrow loose and fluffy.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TRANSPORTING

In traveling on the road, the Tooth Adjusting Lever should be moved to Notch 6. In this position, the teeth are raised above the stripper, out of danger of being bent by hitting obstructions. Raise both ends of the reel as high as possible by moving the front and rear lifting levers into the extreme forward position.

When transporting the machine on a public road at night or during other periods of poor visibility, use a warning lamp in socket provided on the extreme left-hand side of the rake.

A warning lamp, that also may be used with other implements, can be purchased from your John Deere dealer.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

MAKING HAY THE JOHN DEERE WAY

For proper method of cutting and side raking hay the John Deere Way, see illustrations above.

In mowing, enter the field as shown in the inset, making one round to cut hay along the fence. Reverse direction of travel and continue around the field making right-hand turns until the entire field is cut.

Drive the John Deere Side Delivery Rake in the same direction the mower traveled. Working against the heads of the plants, the John Deere places the majority of the leaves inside the windrow. The leaves, shaded from the direct rays of the sun by the stems, are cured rapidly by the free circulation of air.

To hasten curing of especially heavy crops, or to preserve the quality of hay dampened by a shower, turn the windrow upside down by simply driving alongside the windrow with the left rake wheel just at the edge of the hay. This causes the windrow to be placed with the dry side down on dry stubble.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

LUBRICATION

Before operation, put 3 quarts SAE 140 transmission oil in gear case.

LUBRICATION NOTES

Note No. 1 Gear Box. The gear box holds 3 quarts SAE 140 transmission oil. At no time should oil be more than 1 inch below top of oil pan on gear box. Drain, flush out, and refill with fresh oil once each season.

ATTACHMENTS

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TRACTOR TONGUE (HEAVY-DUTY)

349E — The heavy-duty tongue, shown above, is made to provide extra strength for use in extremely heavy crops, or where the rake is subject to a longer than normal using season.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

MINT STRIPPERS

176E — Mint strippers are used to provide clean, positive stripping when raking viny crops, or when working in extremely windy conditions. Extra holes have been added to the main frame angles for attaching the mint strippers. The additional strippers may be left on the rake at all times regardless of the material being raked.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

DOUBLE WHEEL EXTENSION

298E — Double Wheel Extension with 8-inch centers.

The use of double wheels provides a better support for rake when crossing borders in irrigated territory. It also gives the reel a more even contact with the material being raked when working deep corrugated or rough ground.

This wheel extension may be used on either side of the rake.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

CENTER REEL STRIPPERS

AG441E — Center Reel Strippers are used to prevent material from winding around the center reel bearings.

Extra holes have been added in the rake frame angles for attaching these additional strippers.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

WHEEL SCRAPER

AG302E — Wheel Scraper for use on side rake caster wheels.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

HORSE TONGUE AND SEAT

To change the tractor rake into a horse-drawn rake, it is necessary to purchase the following bundles:

  • 87E – Horse Tongue
  • 136E – Seat and Tongue Spreader

Attach Tongue and Seat as shown in the above illustration.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

PNEUMATIC TIRES

To equip your rake with Pneumatic Tires, it is necessary to purchase the following bundles.

  • 143E – Main Wheel with Tire (2 used)
  • 144E – Front Caster Wheel with Tire
  • 274E – Rear Caster Wheel with Tire

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

Spotlight On: Livestock

The Broodmare in Fall

The Broodmare in Fall

by:
from issue:

Mares are not the major emphasis in the fall since they have performed their task of foaling, lactating and being re-bred. After foals are weaned, most breeders tend to focus on weanlings and yearlings that are being prepared for shows, sales and/or performance in the case of long yearlings. Fall management of broodmares is far more critical than some breeders realize and can directly impact foaling and re-breeding successes next year.

Living With Horses

Living With Horses

by:
from issue:

The French breed of Ardennes is closer to what the breed has been in the past. The Ardennes has always been a stockier type of horse, rude as its environment. Today the breed has dramatically changed into a real heavy horse. If the Ardennes had an average weight between 550 and 700kg in the first part of the last century, the balance shows today 1000kg and more. Thus the difference between the Ardennes and their “big” sisters, the Brabants in Belgium, or the Trait du Nord in France, has gone.

On-Farm Meat Processing

The demand for fresh, local meat products – with no taint of industrial process – is absolutely staggering.

New York Horsefarmer Ed Button and his Belgians

New York Horsefarmer: Ed Button and his Belgians

In New York State one does not explore the world of draft horses long before the name of Ed Button is invariably and most respectfully mentioned. Ed’s name can be heard in the conversations of nearly everyone concerned with heavy horses from the most experienced teamsters to the most novice horse hobbyists. His career with Belgians includes a vast catalog of activities: showing, pulling, training, farming, breeding, and driving, which Ed says, “I’ve been doing since I was old enough to hold the lines.”

Interpreting Your Horse's Body Language

Interpreting Your Horse’s Body Language

by:
from issue:

The person who works closely with horses usually develops an intuitive feel for their well-being, and is able to sense when one of them is sick, by picking up the subtle clues from the horse’s body language. A good rider can tell when his mount is having an off day, just by small differences in how the horse travels or carries himself, or responds to things happening around him. And when at rest, in stall or pasture, the horse can also give you clues as to his mental and physical state.

Work Bridle Styles

Work Bridle Styles

Here are fourteen work bridle styles taken from a 1920’s era harness catalog. Regional variants came with different names and configurations, so much so that we have elected to identify these images by letter instead of name so you may reference these pictures directly when ordering harness or talking about repairs or fit concerns with trainers or harness makers. In one region some were know as pigeon wing and others referred to them as batwing or mule bridles.

Shoeing Stocks

An article from the out-of-print Winter 1982 Issue of SFJ.

The Milk and Human Kindness Stanchion Floor

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Friends with Your Wild Heifer

by:
from issue:

So let’s just say this is your first experience with cows, you’ve gone to your local dairy farm, purchased a beautiful bred heifer who is very skittish, has never had a rope on her, or been handled or led, and you’re making arrangements to bring her home. It ought to be dawning on you at this point that you need to safely and securely convey this heifer to your farm and then you need to keep her confined until she begins to calm down enough that she knows she’s home, and she knows where she gets fed.

Icelandic Sheep

Icelandic Sheep

by:
from issue:

I came to sheep farming from a background in the arts – with a passion for spinning and weaving. When we were able to leave our house in town to buy our small farm, a former dairy operation, I had no idea that the desire to have a couple of fiber animals would turn into full time shepherding. I had discovered Icelandic sheep, and was completely enamored of their beauty, their hardiness and their intelligence.

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 1

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 1

by:
from issue:

For the last ten years, I have made hay mostly with a single horse. This has not necessarily been out of choice, as at one time I had hoped to be farming on a larger scale with more horses. Anyway, it does little good to dwell on ‘what if ’. The reality is that I am able to make hay, and through making and modifying machinery, I probably have a better understanding of hay making and the mechanics of draught.

"Work Horse Handbook, 2nd Edition" by Lynn Miller

Draft Collars and How To Size Them

It is difficult to accurately measure a horse’s neck without fitting. In other words, there are so many variables involved in the shape and size of a horse’s neck that the only accurate and easy way to size the neck is to use several collars and put them on one at a time until fitting is found.

Chicken

How To Cure Chicken Roup: Then and Now

How To Cure The Common (Chicken) Cold

Ayrshire Ambassadors Cooperative

Ayrshire Ambassadors Cooperative

The Ayrshire Ambassadors Cooperative was founded in 2016 by a group of dairymen who want to be outspoken advocates of the Ayrshire breed. Ayrshires are one of the most cost-effective breeds for dairy farmers, as the breed is known for efficiently producing large quantities of high-quality milk, primarily on a forage diet. These vigorous and hardy cows can be found grazing in the sun, rain, and cold while other breeds often seek shelter.

Chicken

The Best Chicken Pie Ever

by:
from issue:

She has one more gift to give: Chicken Pie.

Ask A Teamster Ten Common Wrecks With Driving Horses

Ask A Teamster: Ten Common Wrecks with Driving Horses

One of the things I’ve learned over time is that the truly great teamsters rarely – if ever – have upset horses, close calls, mishaps or wrecks, while the less meticulous horsemen often do. Even though it may take a few minutes longer, the master teamsters constantly follow a series of seemingly minute, endlessly detailed, but always wise safety tips. Here are 10 of them:

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

by: ,
from issue:

Missouri Sunlit Hog House: This is an east and west type of house lighted by windows in the south roof. A single stack ventilation system with distributed inlets provides ventilation. Pen partitions may be of wood or metal. This plan takes the place of the original Missouri sunlit house since many farmers had difficulty in building it.

Goat Lessons

Goat Lessons

by:
from issue:

Goats are one of the most incredible homestead animals. They are usually affectionate and sweet, with such funny and smart personalities. Goats give so much goodness for the amount of hay and grain they eat. One cow weighs 1,000 lbs. or more and gives 4-8 gallons of milk a day. One goat weighs around 130 lbs. and gives around a gallon — can you see the difference in feed conversion?

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

We were inspired to try no-tilling vegetables into cover crops after attending the Groffs’ field day in 1996. No-tilling warm season vegetables has proved problematic at our site due to the mulch of cover crop residues keeping the soil too cool and attracting slugs. We thought that no-tilling garlic into this cover crop of oats and Canadian field peas might be the ticket as garlic seems to appreciate being mulched.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT