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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No. 594

This material comes straight out of the John Deere manual for this model. After several decades of usage and familiarity with ground-drive hay rakes I have settled on this outfit as my favorite. I have four John Deeres all alike, with two being parts rakes.

(I do also have a good New Idea with the handy option of reversing the action in order to tedd. Only feature I wish my JDs had.)

I appreciate the wholly accessible design and construction of the John Deere Side Delivery rakes. Simply put, I can work on mine. My buddy Ed Joseph just rebuilt his completely and can’t stop talking about how quiet and sweet working she is.

This material featured a whole bunch of assembly pictures which have been useful to me when trying to fix something so I’ve left them in for you. If you have a make and model of rake you prefer to pull behind your horses (or even behind an old tractor) let us know. Perhaps we can dig up some info on it. LRM

OPERATION AND ADJUSTMENTS

Before starting the John Deere Side-Delivery Rake, make sure that all bolts are tight, cotter pins are spread, and machine has been properly set up.

Be sure to fill gear case with the proper grade of oil and lubricate as shown in lubrication chart.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

When starting a new side rake, turn the reel by hand to be sure it revolves freely and the teeth do not strike the stripper bars. Then throw the rake in gear and turn the wheel by hand to see that the tooth bars and gears run free. Breakage of parts, which causes serious delay and additional expense, can be avoided by taking these precautions before entering the field.

An occasional thorough inspection for loose nuts, worn bolts, and other parts will add to the efficiency of your rake.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TOOTH-ADJUSTING LEVER

The most important adjustment is the angle of the teeth in relation to the surface of the ground. This adjustment regulates the raking of the teeth for loose or tight windrows.

Under average conditions the normal position for the tooth-adjusting lever will be in the center of the rack, at Notch 3. Moving the lever to the rear toward Notches 4 and 5 increases the forward angle of the teeth to produce a loose, fluffy windrow. Moving the lever forward toward Notches 1 and 2, will decrease the tooth angle to produce a tighter windrow. The Sixth Notch is used when transporting rake.

FRONT LIFTING LEVER

The teeth should always be set as high as possible and still pick up all the hay. This setting causes the teeth to pitch the hay into loose windrows permitting free circulation of air. A trial in the center notch of the Front Lifting Lever will give an indication as to the position in which it should be set.

REAR LIFTING LEVER

The Rear Lifting Lever is properly set when the rear end of the reel is slightly higher than the front end. This aids in making the windrow loose and fluffy.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TRANSPORTING

In traveling on the road, the Tooth Adjusting Lever should be moved to Notch 6. In this position, the teeth are raised above the stripper, out of danger of being bent by hitting obstructions. Raise both ends of the reel as high as possible by moving the front and rear lifting levers into the extreme forward position.

When transporting the machine on a public road at night or during other periods of poor visibility, use a warning lamp in socket provided on the extreme left-hand side of the rake.

A warning lamp, that also may be used with other implements, can be purchased from your John Deere dealer.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

MAKING HAY THE JOHN DEERE WAY

For proper method of cutting and side raking hay the John Deere Way, see illustrations above.

In mowing, enter the field as shown in the inset, making one round to cut hay along the fence. Reverse direction of travel and continue around the field making right-hand turns until the entire field is cut.

Drive the John Deere Side Delivery Rake in the same direction the mower traveled. Working against the heads of the plants, the John Deere places the majority of the leaves inside the windrow. The leaves, shaded from the direct rays of the sun by the stems, are cured rapidly by the free circulation of air.

To hasten curing of especially heavy crops, or to preserve the quality of hay dampened by a shower, turn the windrow upside down by simply driving alongside the windrow with the left rake wheel just at the edge of the hay. This causes the windrow to be placed with the dry side down on dry stubble.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

LUBRICATION

Before operation, put 3 quarts SAE 140 transmission oil in gear case.

LUBRICATION NOTES

Note No. 1 Gear Box. The gear box holds 3 quarts SAE 140 transmission oil. At no time should oil be more than 1 inch below top of oil pan on gear box. Drain, flush out, and refill with fresh oil once each season.

ATTACHMENTS

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TRACTOR TONGUE (HEAVY-DUTY)

349E — The heavy-duty tongue, shown above, is made to provide extra strength for use in extremely heavy crops, or where the rake is subject to a longer than normal using season.

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Spotlight On: Crops & Soil

Seed Quality from Two Perspectives

Seed Quality from Two Perspectives

by:
from issue:

We are approaching this from a seed quality standpoint, not just a seed saving one. Saving seed is fairly simple to do, but the results from planting those seeds can be very mixed; without a basis of understanding of seed quality, people can be disappointed and confused as to why they got the results they did. Both the home gardener and the seed company must understand seed quality to be successful in their respective endeavors.

Cultivating Questions: Alternative Tillage & Inter-Seeding Techniques

Our intention is not to advocate the oddball living mulches we use with this single row inter-seeding system, but just to show how it is possible to utilize the between-row areas to improve insect habitat, reduce erosion, conserve moisture, fix some nitrogen, and grow a good bit of extra organic matter. If nothing else, experimenting with these alternative practices continues to keep farming exciting as we begin our twentieth season of bio-extensive market gardening.

Cane Grinding

Cane Grinding: An Age-Old Georgia Tradition

by:
from issue:

Most sugar cane is processed in refineries to give us molasses, brown sugar, and various kinds of white sugar. However, some South Georgia farms that raise sugar cane still process it the old way to produce the special tasting sweetener for their own food. One such farm is the Rocking R Ranch in Kibbee, Georgia. It is owned by Charles and Patricia Roberts and their sons. The process they use has not changed in the past 100 years. This is how it is done.

Soil, Vegetation, and Acidity

From Dusty Shelves: Audels Gardeners and Growers Guide teaches us about soil acidity.

Open-Pollinated Corn at Spruce Run Farm

Open-Pollinated Corn at Spruce Run Farm

by:
from issue:

The old way of selecting seed from open-pollinated corn involved selecting the best ears from the poorest ground. I have tried to select perfect ears based on the open-pollinated seed corn standards of the past. I learned these standards from old agricultural texts. The chosen ears of Reid’s average from 9 to 10.5 inches long and have smooth, well-formed grains in straight rows. I try to select ears with grains that extend to the end of the cob.

On-Farm Meat Processing

The demand for fresh, local meat products – with no taint of industrial process – is absolutely staggering.

Marketable Cover Crops

Marketable Cover Crops

by:
from issue:

Our cover crops have to provide the benefits of smothering weeds, improving soil structure, and replenishing organic matter. They also have to produce some income. For these purposes, we use turnips, mustard and lettuce within our plant successions. I broadcast these seeds thickly on areas where cover crops are necessary and let them do their work.

Ginseng Culture

Ginseng Culture

U.S. Department of Agriculture Farmer’s Bulletin No. 1184 Issued 1921, Revised 1941 — The evident preference of the Chinese for the wild root and the unsatisfactory state of the general market for cultivated ginseng have caused grave doubts as to the future prospects of the industry. These doubts will probably be realized unless growers should strive for quality of product and not for quantity of production, as has been the all too common practice in the past.

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 1

Our mild climate makes it too easy to overwinter cover crops. Then the typically wet springs (and, on our farm, wet soils) let the cover put on loads of topgrowth before getting on the soil. Buckwheat is the only crop that I can be certain will winterkill. Field peas, oats, annual rye and crimson clover have all overwintered here. Any suggestions?

Mullein Indigenous Friend to All

Mullein: Indigenous Friend to All

by:
from issue:

Mullein is a hardy native, soft and sturdy requiring no extra effort to thrive on your part. Whether you care to make your own medicines or not, consider mullein’s value to bees, bumblebees, butterflies, moths, dragonflies, who are needing nectar and nourishment that is toxin free and safe to consume. In this case, all you have to do is… nothing. What could be simpler?

Farm Manure

Farm Manure

Naturally there is great variation in manure according to the animals it is made by, the feeding and bedding material, and the manner in which it is kept. Different analyses naturally shows different results and the tables here given serve only as a guide or index to the various kinds. The manure heap, by the way, is no place for old tin cans, bottles, glass, and other similar waste material.

Bamboo A Multipurpose Agroforestry Crop

Bamboo: A Multipurpose Agroforestry Crop

by:
from issue:

The bamboos are gaining increased attention as an alternative crop with multiple uses and benefits: 1) domestic use around the farm (e.g., vegetable stakes, trellis poles, shade laths); 2) commercial production for use in construction, food, and the arts (e.g., concrete reinforcement, fishing poles, furniture, crafts, edible bamboo shoots, musical instruments); and 3) ornamental, landscape, and conservation uses (e.g., specimen plants, screens, hedges, riparian buffer zone).

Low Tillage Radish Onions

Low Tillage Radish Onions

by:
from issue:

The radishes came up quick, filling the garden canopy completely that fall, and the following spring we found the plot was clean of weeds and rows of open holes were left where the radish roots had been growing. Well, we had a few extra onion plants that spring and decided to plant them in these holes, since we already had very clear lines laid out for us and a clean seedbed. What we got were the best looking onions that have ever come out of our gardens.

Starting Seeds

From Dusty Shelves: A WWII era article from Farming For Security

Lost Apples

Lost Apples

The mindboggling agricultural plant and animal diversity, at the beginning of the twentieth century, should have been a treasure trove which mankind worked tirelessy to maintain. Such has not been the case. Alas, much has been lost, perhaps forever. Here are images and information on a handful of apple varieties from a valuable hundred year old text in our library.

How to Grow an Acre of Potatoes

How to Grow an Acre of Potatoes

by:
from issue:

Heretofore potato production in this country has been conducted along extensive rather than intensive lines. In other words, we have been satisfied to plant twice as many acres as should have been necessary to produce a sufficient quantity of potatoes for our food requirements. Present economic conditions compel the grower to consider more seriously the desirability of reducing the cost of production by increasing the yield per acre.

Asparagus in Holland

Asparagus in Holland

by:
from issue:

The asparagus culture in Holland is for the majority white asparagus, grown in ridges. This piece of land used to be the headland of the field. The soil was therefore compact, and a big tractor came with a spader, loosening the soil. After that I used the horse for the lighter harrowing and scuffle work to prevent soil compaction. This land lies high for Dutch standards and has a low ground water level, that is why asparagus can grow there, which can root 3 foot deep over the years.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT