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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No. 594

This material comes straight out of the John Deere manual for this model. After several decades of usage and familiarity with ground-drive hay rakes I have settled on this outfit as my favorite. I have four John Deeres all alike, with two being parts rakes.

(I do also have a good New Idea with the handy option of reversing the action in order to tedd. Only feature I wish my JDs had.)

I appreciate the wholly accessible design and construction of the John Deere Side Delivery rakes. Simply put, I can work on mine. My buddy Ed Joseph just rebuilt his completely and can’t stop talking about how quiet and sweet working she is.

This material featured a whole bunch of assembly pictures which have been useful to me when trying to fix something so I’ve left them in for you. If you have a make and model of rake you prefer to pull behind your horses (or even behind an old tractor) let us know. Perhaps we can dig up some info on it. LRM

OPERATION AND ADJUSTMENTS

Before starting the John Deere Side-Delivery Rake, make sure that all bolts are tight, cotter pins are spread, and machine has been properly set up.

Be sure to fill gear case with the proper grade of oil and lubricate as shown in lubrication chart.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

When starting a new side rake, turn the reel by hand to be sure it revolves freely and the teeth do not strike the stripper bars. Then throw the rake in gear and turn the wheel by hand to see that the tooth bars and gears run free. Breakage of parts, which causes serious delay and additional expense, can be avoided by taking these precautions before entering the field.

An occasional thorough inspection for loose nuts, worn bolts, and other parts will add to the efficiency of your rake.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TOOTH-ADJUSTING LEVER

The most important adjustment is the angle of the teeth in relation to the surface of the ground. This adjustment regulates the raking of the teeth for loose or tight windrows.

Under average conditions the normal position for the tooth-adjusting lever will be in the center of the rack, at Notch 3. Moving the lever to the rear toward Notches 4 and 5 increases the forward angle of the teeth to produce a loose, fluffy windrow. Moving the lever forward toward Notches 1 and 2, will decrease the tooth angle to produce a tighter windrow. The Sixth Notch is used when transporting rake.

FRONT LIFTING LEVER

The teeth should always be set as high as possible and still pick up all the hay. This setting causes the teeth to pitch the hay into loose windrows permitting free circulation of air. A trial in the center notch of the Front Lifting Lever will give an indication as to the position in which it should be set.

REAR LIFTING LEVER

The Rear Lifting Lever is properly set when the rear end of the reel is slightly higher than the front end. This aids in making the windrow loose and fluffy.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TRANSPORTING

In traveling on the road, the Tooth Adjusting Lever should be moved to Notch 6. In this position, the teeth are raised above the stripper, out of danger of being bent by hitting obstructions. Raise both ends of the reel as high as possible by moving the front and rear lifting levers into the extreme forward position.

When transporting the machine on a public road at night or during other periods of poor visibility, use a warning lamp in socket provided on the extreme left-hand side of the rake.

A warning lamp, that also may be used with other implements, can be purchased from your John Deere dealer.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

MAKING HAY THE JOHN DEERE WAY

For proper method of cutting and side raking hay the John Deere Way, see illustrations above.

In mowing, enter the field as shown in the inset, making one round to cut hay along the fence. Reverse direction of travel and continue around the field making right-hand turns until the entire field is cut.

Drive the John Deere Side Delivery Rake in the same direction the mower traveled. Working against the heads of the plants, the John Deere places the majority of the leaves inside the windrow. The leaves, shaded from the direct rays of the sun by the stems, are cured rapidly by the free circulation of air.

To hasten curing of especially heavy crops, or to preserve the quality of hay dampened by a shower, turn the windrow upside down by simply driving alongside the windrow with the left rake wheel just at the edge of the hay. This causes the windrow to be placed with the dry side down on dry stubble.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

LUBRICATION

Before operation, put 3 quarts SAE 140 transmission oil in gear case.

LUBRICATION NOTES

Note No. 1 Gear Box. The gear box holds 3 quarts SAE 140 transmission oil. At no time should oil be more than 1 inch below top of oil pan on gear box. Drain, flush out, and refill with fresh oil once each season.

ATTACHMENTS

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

TRACTOR TONGUE (HEAVY-DUTY)

349E — The heavy-duty tongue, shown above, is made to provide extra strength for use in extremely heavy crops, or where the rake is subject to a longer than normal using season.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

MINT STRIPPERS

176E — Mint strippers are used to provide clean, positive stripping when raking viny crops, or when working in extremely windy conditions. Extra holes have been added to the main frame angles for attaching the mint strippers. The additional strippers may be left on the rake at all times regardless of the material being raked.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

DOUBLE WHEEL EXTENSION

298E — Double Wheel Extension with 8-inch centers.

The use of double wheels provides a better support for rake when crossing borders in irrigated territory. It also gives the reel a more even contact with the material being raked when working deep corrugated or rough ground.

This wheel extension may be used on either side of the rake.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

CENTER REEL STRIPPERS

AG441E — Center Reel Strippers are used to prevent material from winding around the center reel bearings.

Extra holes have been added in the rake frame angles for attaching these additional strippers.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

WHEEL SCRAPER

AG302E — Wheel Scraper for use on side rake caster wheels.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

HORSE TONGUE AND SEAT

To change the tractor rake into a horse-drawn rake, it is necessary to purchase the following bundles:

  • 87E – Horse Tongue
  • 136E – Seat and Tongue Spreader

Attach Tongue and Seat as shown in the above illustration.

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

PNEUMATIC TIRES

To equip your rake with Pneumatic Tires, it is necessary to purchase the following bundles.

  • 143E – Main Wheel with Tire (2 used)
  • 144E – Front Caster Wheel with Tire
  • 274E – Rear Caster Wheel with Tire

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

John Deere Side Delivery Rake No 594

Spotlight On: Crops & Soil

Lost Apples

Lost Apples

The mindboggling agricultural plant and animal diversity, at the beginning of the twentieth century, should have been a treasure trove which mankind worked tirelessy to maintain. Such has not been the case. Alas, much has been lost, perhaps forever. Here are images and information on a handful of apple varieties from a valuable hundred year old text in our library.

Swallow

Rotation As A Means Of Blight Control

Every farmer knows that when a crop is grown on the same field year after year, it becomes inferior in quality and the yield steadily diminishes.

Walki Biodegradable Mulching Paper

New Biodegradable Mulching Paper

Views of any and all modern farming stir questions for me. The most common wonder for me has been ‘how come we haven’t come up with a something to replace plastic?’ It’s used for cold frames, hotbeds, greenhouses, silage and haylage bagging and it is used for mulch. That’s why when I read of this new Swedish innovation in specialized paper mulching I got the itch to scratch and learn more. What follows is what we know. We’d like to know more. LRM

Planting Calendar and Other Diagrams

From Dusty Shelves: A 1943 calendar for seeding your vegetable garden.

On-Farm Meat Processing

The demand for fresh, local meat products – with no taint of industrial process – is absolutely staggering.

Barnyard Manure

Barnyard Manure

by:
from issue:

The amount of manure produced must be considered in planning a cropping system for a farm. If one wishes to manure one-fifth of the land every year with 10 tons per acre, there would have to be provided two tons per year for each acre of the farm. This would require about one cow or horse, or equivalent, for each six acres of land.

Of Peace and Quiet

LittleField Notes: Of Peace and Quiet

by:
from issue:

Walk with me for a moment to the edge of the Waterfall Field. We can lean on the gate and let our gaze soak up the mid-summer scene: a perfect blue sky and not a breath of wind. Movement catches your eye, and in the distance you see a threesome hard at work in the hayfield. Two Suffolk horses, heads bobbing, making good time followed by a man comfortably seated on a mowing machine. The waist high grass and clover falls steadily in neat swaths behind the mower. What you can’t help but notice is the quiet.

Apple Cider Autumns Nectar

Apple Cider, Autumn’s Nectar

by:
from issue:

While autumn’s beauty is food for our souls, autumn’s harvest provides food for our tables. Along with the many hours and days of canning and freezing our garden produce, harvest time also means apple cider making for our family. We have been making apple cider, or sweet cider as it is commonly called, for six years. Beginning slowly, the demand for our juice has resulted in a production of over six hundred gallons this year.

Marketable Cover Crops

Marketable Cover Crops

by:
from issue:

Our cover crops have to provide the benefits of smothering weeds, improving soil structure, and replenishing organic matter. They also have to produce some income. For these purposes, we use turnips, mustard and lettuce within our plant successions. I broadcast these seeds thickly on areas where cover crops are necessary and let them do their work.

Soil, Vegetation, and Acidity

From Dusty Shelves: Audels Gardeners and Growers Guide teaches us about soil acidity.

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 1

Our mild climate makes it too easy to overwinter cover crops. Then the typically wet springs (and, on our farm, wet soils) let the cover put on loads of topgrowth before getting on the soil. Buckwheat is the only crop that I can be certain will winterkill. Field peas, oats, annual rye and crimson clover have all overwintered here. Any suggestions?

Fjordworks: Horse Powered Potatoes

Fjordworks: Horse Powered Potatoes

This is the account of how one farm put more horse power into the planting, cultivation, and harvesting of its potato crop. Ever since we began farming on our own in 1994 one of our principle aims has been the conversion of our farm operation to live horse power wherever feasible. This has meant replacing mechanized tools such as tractors and rototillers and figuring out how to reduce human labor as we expanded upon the labor capacity of our work horses.

Fjordworks Horse Powered Potatoes Part 2

Fjordworks: Horse Powered Potatoes Part Two

These types of team implements for digging potatoes were the first big innovation in horse powered potato harvesting in the mid-19th century. Prior to the horse drawn digger the limitation on how many potatoes a farmer could plant was how many the farm crew could dig by hand. The basic design of these early diggers works so well that new models of this type of digger are once again being manufactured by contemporary horse drawn equipment suppliers.

Winter Production of Fresh Vegetables

Winter Production of Fresh Vegetables

by:
from issue:

Any claim about winter production of fresh vegetables, with minimal or no heating or heat storage systems, seems highly improbable. The weather is too cold and the days are too short. Low winter temperatures, however, are not an insurmountable barrier. Nor is winter day-length the barrier it may appear to be. In fact most of the continental US has far more winter sunshine than parts of the world where, due to milder temperatures, fresh winter vegetable production has a long tradition.

Beautiful Grasses

What follow are a series of magnificent hundred-year old botanist’s watercolors depicting several useful grass varieties. Artworks such as this are found on the pages of Small Farmer’s Journal quite regularly and may be part of the reason that the small farm world considers this unusual magazine to be one of the world’s periodical gold standards.

Seed Quality from Two Perspectives

Seed Quality from Two Perspectives

by:
from issue:

We are approaching this from a seed quality standpoint, not just a seed saving one. Saving seed is fairly simple to do, but the results from planting those seeds can be very mixed; without a basis of understanding of seed quality, people can be disappointed and confused as to why they got the results they did. Both the home gardener and the seed company must understand seed quality to be successful in their respective endeavors.

Ginseng Culture

Ginseng Culture

U.S. Department of Agriculture Farmer’s Bulletin No. 1184 Issued 1921, Revised 1941 — The evident preference of the Chinese for the wild root and the unsatisfactory state of the general market for cultivated ginseng have caused grave doubts as to the future prospects of the industry. These doubts will probably be realized unless growers should strive for quality of product and not for quantity of production, as has been the all too common practice in the past.

Beating the Beetles – War & Peace in a Houston Garden

Blooming that is, unless the cucumber beetles arrive first.
And arrive they have … “At first I thought they looked like big, yellow lady bugs.” Paul said, “Then I looked…

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT