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Living With Horses

Living With Horses

by Paul Schmit of Teinten, Belgium

A LOOK BACK

The picture shown below has surely caught your eyes as you turned to this page of SFJ. You might have looked to the carthorse to determine its breed or you might have focused on the horsemen to find out the period this picture was taken. Take also the time to analyse the background of this photograph and you will see a rich countryside. A small farm building surrounded by a hilly forest, an orchard and a pasture full of various plants. Every living being here has found his place, from the people who cultivated the land to the small insect which flew from plant to plant to collect its nutrition.

Living With Horses

European farm works in the beginning of the 20th century.

The picture, which was taken before WW II, shows my grandpa François Lecomte, who was born in 1891 and who spent his life by farming and serving his neighbours as a blacksmith in a small village called “Téinten” located in the middle west of Luxembourg. He holds the jerk line of his carthorse harnessed to pull a two wheeled wagon, called a “Teimer”, which served many different purposes. This ranged from transporting the buckets full of fruits and big hay loads back home or the manure out of the stables. A single horse hitch was very common at this time as the farmers were very poor and beside the several cows and pigs they were only able to feed one horse.

If the work did require more draft power, a second horse had to be borrowed from a neighbour and hitched in front of the owner’s horse. In this case the traces of both horses were attached immediately to the shafts, however with a bad angle of draft, especially for the extra horse in front. When the farmers spoke about their horses, they mentioned the grey, the black or the bay horse. They didn’t worry too much about pedigrees and simply bought from the horse dealer what had an acceptable morphology and a clear head. The national stud book in Luxembourg, initially consisting only of the Ardennes draft horse breed, was established in 1921. Today it covers all kind of horses.

In the beginning of the last century, the vast majority of the 431 inhabitants of “Téinten” have been small farmers or worked as day labourers. Not every family, but also every house had its own name like “A Jounker”, “A Péiks” or “A Mäesch”. The house of my grandparents was called “A Schmatts” as “Schmatt” is the Luxembourg’s name for a blacksmith. The life was as hard as the soil in the Ardennes, the hilly countryside at the north-east of France. The south-east of Belgium and Luxembourg, was not of a great fertility. The local draft horse breed was a small horse and its conformation was far away from the show type horses of today, which stand high on their heavily feathered feet.

Today, the number of citizens in “Téinten” has nearly doubled, but there are only three farmers left who do their work on the fields full time. During the last century a lot of people left their rural milieu in order to find employment in the steel industry, which flourished at that time as some iron ore was found in the south of the country. The steel and finally also the slag, a by-product of the blast furnaces, which was used by the farmers as fertilizer on the fields, gave a certain prosperity to our nation.

Rural craftsmanship has changed into business. Not cultivating the land and harvesting what Mother Nature offers you does not guide the life of most of the people anymore, but making money is the name of the game. Finally, as you got some money, getting more money is what makes the challenge. If you leave your house at the morning by your air-conditioned car, closing the door of your garage by remote control, arriving after a more or less stressful drive to the underground car park of your company and being gently transported by an elevator to your office, you don’t have to worry about nature. It doesn’t matter if some rain helps grow the plants or if the sun helps to dry the hay on the fields.

Our villages and their surroundings are getting poorer from year to year. Not only by the modern agriculture itself, which becomes more and more an industrialized process, but also by the people who swarm out of the cities to the villages, where building land is still available at an acceptable price. The terrain around their small castles is kept clean by frequent acting motorized lawn mowers and large amounts of pesticides. There is definitely no place anymore for the elements shown in the background of picture #1.

OUR WORLD

We, my wife Cathy and I, still live in the village of my ancestors. Not at the farm “A Schmatts”, as this was given to my older brother. Our farm buildings are of recent time, while the main house is getting built, the barn and the stable are nearly finished. Even if everything is built with respect to the past and hosts a collection of old horse drawn farm machinery, we don’t look forward to opening a museum, nor do we think that we are one of the true references for doing farm jobs with horses in Europe. We both learned farming as a kid in the 70’s and the 80’s on different farms using tractor power. Today we try to put our farming methods in a more natural context. We don’t see our approach as a static one, with rules based on strong traditions, but we consequently adopt our methods.

An old beekeeper, who taught me in younger years some tricks about handling bees, always said to me “As a beekeeper you will rest an apprentice for all of your life”. What he meant with this statement was that each year differs from the year before. One year, nature offers a rich harvest of honey, the next one the cups get only half full. In one colony you can find bees with a smart character, while opening the next hive some other individuals greet you. What the beekeeper has finally to do is to learn to adapt himself to the different conditions that nature imposes on him.

This approach is, in my view, not only valuable for beekeeping, but it is true for all that you do in relation with the nature. You have to learn consequently and think about your actions over and over. By this article, which I consider as a small support to this magnificent publication, I simply try to share our experiences with you and would be very delighted to get some feedback, positive or negative.

There is obviously no better way for farming with respect to nature than doing it with horses. Our farm is run on organic principles and is using draft horses with modern farm machinery, mainly manufactured in USA but also some of our own development. We strictly rely on ground drive implements as using a donkey engine on horse drawn forecarts is not an option for us. (I may only see a reason behind this approach within the structures of life of the Amish subculture, but surely not in Western Europe.) However, to be honest, I must add that some of the work on our farm is done by contractors using tractor power, for example to run the hay baler. Moreover, even if we get some financial income, through participating in different programmes supported by our ministry of agriculture and the EU for extensive farming methods, we don’t farm to survive financially, but we do it simply as a vocation. Improving the quality of life, not only of ourselves, but maintaining the biodiversity around us is our goal.

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