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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

McCormick-Deering Tractor Disc Harrow No. 10-A

McCormick-Deering Tractor Disc Harrow No. 10-A

Small to mid-sized disc-harrows are a most useful tillage implement. Some farmers consider them indispensable. Discs such as the McD 10-A may be used with either tractors or big hitches of work horses. This tool will cut both plowed and unplowed ground. Ahead of the moldboard plow, the disc harrow is a valuable tool to cut up and free tough sod. When employed in tandem with spring tooth harrows, a great deal of work can be accomplished in much less time. Originally offered as a pamphlet to new owners of the implement, we offer this reprint unabridged because it may be helpful to someone struggling to make an old gang disc usable. SFJ

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INSTRUCTIONS FOR SETTING UP

  • Remove all wires and arrange parts conveniently.
  • Oil all bearings and moving parts as you proceed and see that they work freely.
  • Bolts must be used in the holes in which they are found, or in parts to which they are attached, unless otherwise shown.
  • Shaded portions in the illustrations show parts to be assembled. These must be placed on the machine in the order numbered.
  • In the following instructions, wherever the terms “left” and “right” are used, it should be understood to mean from a position behind and facing the machine.

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Front Harrow

(See Illustration No. 1)

  1. Attach front harrow frame to gangs with bolts located in bearings. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  2. Bolt draft angles, assembled with gang adjusting screw adjusting screw and set levers, to frame and cross bar as illustrated. Note: The gang adjusting screw bearing is furnished assembled in lower holes in adjusting screw standards. This bearing may be moved to upper holes, if more convenient for the operator (See “A”, Illustration No. 1.)
  3. Secure lower end of adjusting screw standard braces to frame angles. See that nuts on adjusting screw standard brace truss are tight.
  4. Slip set lever bars through slots in snubbing plate and secure to gang bearings with drilled bolts. Be sure bow in set lever bars is UP, exactly as illustrated. Attach set lever bars to set levers at the second (or inside) hole at front end of set lever bars for 5-ft. And 6-ft. Harrows, and at the end hole for 7-ft. And 8-ft Harrows. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  5. Secure inner and outer standard braces as shown.
  6. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles as illustrated. The reinforcement plates go inside the weight box angle.

Rear Harrow

(See Illustration No. 2)

  1. Attach rear harrow frame to gangs with bolts located in bearings. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  2. Secure outer standard braces as illustrated.
  3. Attach outer draw bars, right and left, to inner gang bearings with bolts located in bearings. Attach draw bars to standards and weight box-angles as shown. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  4. Pass inner draw bars between swivel plates and straps and secure with drilled bolt, nut and cotter. Note: To obtain more or less angle to the rear gangs than the front, the bolt may be moved to the rear or front hole as required by the operator.
  5. Move front harrow into positions and attach rear harrow to front by means of bolts through connection eyes and weight box angles.
  6. Attach outer draw bar pressure brackets as shown. The cutting depth of the inner end of rear gangs may be controlled by raising or lowering the brackets.
  7. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles as illustrated.

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Power Gang Angling Attachment (Special)

This attachment is furnished in a complete unit and can be connected to the harrow by removing the draft angles and connections of the crank angling mechanism, and bolting the power angling attachment to front harrow frame and cross bar as shown in illustration. The set lever should be attached to set lever bars at the second (or inside) hole at the front end of set lever bars for 5 and 6 ft. Harrows, and at the end hole for 7 and 8 ft. Harrows. If necessary, readjust snubbing plate so that the gangs are held at the required working level.

To angle the gangs, pull the adjusting rope and move tractor ahead until the desired working angle is obtained. To straighten the gangs, back the tractor.

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Rocking Scrapers (Special)

  1. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles by means of bolts through scraper bar hanger. The reinforcement plate goes inside the angle (See “6”, Illustration No. 1.) The straight end of the scraper spring rests on the weight box angle. Hook the scraper spring in spring holder.
  2. Attach scraper lever and stop as illustrated. Set lock nuts on the stop so that the scraper blades come to the extreme edge of the disks when the scraper is rocked.
  3. Adjust scraper blades to just clear the disks when at center, by using the clamp near the scraper bar hanger. Fasten ropes as shown.

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Full Blade Scrapers (Special)

Attach scraper bar, complete with scrapers, to rear weight box angles with bolts and space pipes. The space pipes go between the two angles.

Scrapers should be set (by means of bolts and slotted holes in scraper bar) to just clear the disk blades.

Center Tooth Attachment (Special)

(For Rear Harrow Only)

Bolt Center Tooth Attachment securely to rear harrow frame and cross bar angles, midway between the inner draw bars, as illustrated.

Note: For harrows equipped with 16” disk blades, the center tooth support bracket (P24325) is bolted to the angles with the offset UP, as illustrated. For 18” disk blades, P24325 is turned over and bolted to the angles with the offset DOWN.

Remove the inner draw bar swivel pins and attach the hitch to the tractor disk rear harrow by using the drilled bolts furnished with the hitch. Use the holes at the front end of the hitch angles that more nearly equal the distance between the inner draw bar swivel pin holes.

Adjust the hitch height by means of stop bolts and double nuts, the angles being held between the two nuts.

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INSTRUCTION FOR ADJUSTING AND OPERATING

Keep all moving parts well lubricated when the harrow is in use. Use the grease gun supplied with the tractor.

For best results, the draft angles (front frame) on the front harrow should be approximately level when the harrow is hitched to the tractor. If necessary, adjust tractor draw bar to obtain this result.

In practically all field work the gangs should run level and cut at an even depth. Adjust the front harrow gangs to suit by raising or lowering the pressure plate at center of front harrow frame.

The rear gangs may be leveled by raising or lowering the outer draw bar pressure plates. If the harrow ridges the soil between the rear gangs, the soil may be leveled by raising the inner end of the gangs, or by giving them less angle by moving the rear harrow frame forward at the three holes in the inner draw bars.

If the rear gangs do not fill a center depression left by the front harrow, reverse the above adjustment.

The adjustment at the outer ends of the rear harrow frame is for spacing the rear gangs closer or farther apart to meet field conditions, or for changing the trailing position of the rear harrow. The adjustment is carefully set and locked in place at the factory to meet average conditions. If any change is necessary move both gangs outward.

For all field work the upper collar on the gang adjusting screw should be placed at the hole nearest the hand crank so that if the harrow is backed the gangs may straighten. With forward movement the gangs will again assume angle. (The lower hold, next to the crank bearing, is intended only for demonstration purposes.)

Spotlight On: Crops & Soil

Cane Grinding

Cane Grinding: An Age-Old Georgia Tradition

by:
from issue:

Most sugar cane is processed in refineries to give us molasses, brown sugar, and various kinds of white sugar. However, some South Georgia farms that raise sugar cane still process it the old way to produce the special tasting sweetener for their own food. One such farm is the Rocking R Ranch in Kibbee, Georgia. It is owned by Charles and Patricia Roberts and their sons. The process they use has not changed in the past 100 years. This is how it is done.

Swallow

Rotation As A Means Of Blight Control

Every farmer knows that when a crop is grown on the same field year after year, it becomes inferior in quality and the yield steadily diminishes.

Cultivating Questions Ridge-Till Revisited

Cultivating Questions: Ridge-Till Revisited

Delay ridge building until early fall so that the cover crop on the ridge does not grow more than 12” tall before winter. The residues from a short cover crop will be much less challenging to cultivate than a tall stand of oats, especially if tangly field peas are mixed in. Waiting for the winterkilled cover crop residues to breakdown as long as possible before ridge-tilling in the spring will also make cultivation much easier until you gain familiarity with the system.

Beating the Beetles – War & Peace in a Houston Garden

Blooming that is, unless the cucumber beetles arrive first.
And arrive they have … “At first I thought they looked like big, yellow lady bugs.” Paul said, “Then I looked…

Apple Cider Autumns Nectar

Apple Cider, Autumn’s Nectar

by:
from issue:

While autumn’s beauty is food for our souls, autumn’s harvest provides food for our tables. Along with the many hours and days of canning and freezing our garden produce, harvest time also means apple cider making for our family. We have been making apple cider, or sweet cider as it is commonly called, for six years. Beginning slowly, the demand for our juice has resulted in a production of over six hundred gallons this year.

Barnyard Manure

Barnyard Manure

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from issue:

The amount of manure produced must be considered in planning a cropping system for a farm. If one wishes to manure one-fifth of the land every year with 10 tons per acre, there would have to be provided two tons per year for each acre of the farm. This would require about one cow or horse, or equivalent, for each six acres of land.

Purslane, Portahoopies and Plow Planted Peas

Purslane, Portahoopies and Plow Planted Peas

For those not familiar with this tasty, nutritious weed, purslane can be a real challenge to manage in vegetable crops for a number of reasons. The seeds of this weed remain viable for many years in the garden, and generally do not germinate until hot weather — that is, after many of the market garden crops have already been planted. To make matters worse, this succulent plant often reroots after cultivation. Purslane also grows so close to the ground that it is impossible to control by mowing.

Mullein Indigenous Friend to All

Mullein: Indigenous Friend to All

by:
from issue:

Mullein is a hardy native, soft and sturdy requiring no extra effort to thrive on your part. Whether you care to make your own medicines or not, consider mullein’s value to bees, bumblebees, butterflies, moths, dragonflies, who are needing nectar and nourishment that is toxin free and safe to consume. In this case, all you have to do is… nothing. What could be simpler?

Making Sorghum Molasses

Making Sorghum Molasses

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from issue:

Growing sorghum doesn’t take much work, according to Buhrman. You plant it in the spring, work it a couple of times and that’s about all that’s required until late in the growing season. That is when the work begins. Before it is cut, all the stalks have to be “bladed” – the leaves removed from the stalks. It’s then cut, then the tassles are cut off, and the stalks are fed through a crusher. The crusher forces the juices out of the plant. The sorghum juice is then boiled in a vat for four to five hours until nothing is left but the syrup.

Fjordworks Horse Powered Potatoes Part 2

Fjordworks: Horse Powered Potatoes Part Two

These types of team implements for digging potatoes were the first big innovation in horse powered potato harvesting in the mid-19th century. Prior to the horse drawn digger the limitation on how many potatoes a farmer could plant was how many the farm crew could dig by hand. The basic design of these early diggers works so well that new models of this type of digger are once again being manufactured by contemporary horse drawn equipment suppliers.

Winter Production of Fresh Vegetables

Winter Production of Fresh Vegetables

by:
from issue:

Any claim about winter production of fresh vegetables, with minimal or no heating or heat storage systems, seems highly improbable. The weather is too cold and the days are too short. Low winter temperatures, however, are not an insurmountable barrier. Nor is winter day-length the barrier it may appear to be. In fact most of the continental US has far more winter sunshine than parts of the world where, due to milder temperatures, fresh winter vegetable production has a long tradition.

Cabbage

Cabbage

by:
from issue:

Cabbage is the most important vegetable commercially of the cole crops, which include cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, kohlrabi, collard, broccoli, and many others. It also ranks as one of the most important of all vegetable crops and is universally cultivated as a garden, truck and general farm crop. The market for cabbage, like that for potatoes, is continuous throughout the year, and this tends to make it one of the staple vegetables.

Planting Calendar and Other Diagrams

From Dusty Shelves: A 1943 calendar for seeding your vegetable garden.

On-Farm Meat Processing

The demand for fresh, local meat products – with no taint of industrial process – is absolutely staggering.

Cultivating Questions

Cultivating Questions: Concerning the Bioextensive Market Garden

One of our goals when we first started farming here was to develop the farm as a self-contained nutrient system. Unlike the almost complete recycling of nutrients which can take place on a livestock operation, we are always amazed – even a little disturbed – to see how many tons of fertility and organic matter leave the market garden each year with so little returned to the good earth.

Open-Pollinated Corn at Spruce Run Farm

Open-Pollinated Corn at Spruce Run Farm

by:
from issue:

The old way of selecting seed from open-pollinated corn involved selecting the best ears from the poorest ground. I have tried to select perfect ears based on the open-pollinated seed corn standards of the past. I learned these standards from old agricultural texts. The chosen ears of Reid’s average from 9 to 10.5 inches long and have smooth, well-formed grains in straight rows. I try to select ears with grains that extend to the end of the cob.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT