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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PST

McCormick-Deering Tractor Disc Harrow No. 10-A

McCormick-Deering Tractor Disc Harrow No. 10-A

Small to mid-sized disc-harrows are a most useful tillage implement. Some farmers consider them indispensable. Discs such as the McD 10-A may be used with either tractors or big hitches of work horses. This tool will cut both plowed and unplowed ground. Ahead of the moldboard plow, the disc harrow is a valuable tool to cut up and free tough sod. When employed in tandem with spring tooth harrows, a great deal of work can be accomplished in much less time. Originally offered as a pamphlet to new owners of the implement, we offer this reprint unabridged because it may be helpful to someone struggling to make an old gang disc usable. SFJ

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INSTRUCTIONS FOR SETTING UP

  • Remove all wires and arrange parts conveniently.
  • Oil all bearings and moving parts as you proceed and see that they work freely.
  • Bolts must be used in the holes in which they are found, or in parts to which they are attached, unless otherwise shown.
  • Shaded portions in the illustrations show parts to be assembled. These must be placed on the machine in the order numbered.
  • In the following instructions, wherever the terms “left” and “right” are used, it should be understood to mean from a position behind and facing the machine.

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Front Harrow

(See Illustration No. 1)

  1. Attach front harrow frame to gangs with bolts located in bearings. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  2. Bolt draft angles, assembled with gang adjusting screw adjusting screw and set levers, to frame and cross bar as illustrated. Note: The gang adjusting screw bearing is furnished assembled in lower holes in adjusting screw standards. This bearing may be moved to upper holes, if more convenient for the operator (See “A”, Illustration No. 1.)
  3. Secure lower end of adjusting screw standard braces to frame angles. See that nuts on adjusting screw standard brace truss are tight.
  4. Slip set lever bars through slots in snubbing plate and secure to gang bearings with drilled bolts. Be sure bow in set lever bars is UP, exactly as illustrated. Attach set lever bars to set levers at the second (or inside) hole at front end of set lever bars for 5-ft. And 6-ft. Harrows, and at the end hole for 7-ft. And 8-ft Harrows. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  5. Secure inner and outer standard braces as shown.
  6. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles as illustrated. The reinforcement plates go inside the weight box angle.

Rear Harrow

(See Illustration No. 2)

  1. Attach rear harrow frame to gangs with bolts located in bearings. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  2. Secure outer standard braces as illustrated.
  3. Attach outer draw bars, right and left, to inner gang bearings with bolts located in bearings. Attach draw bars to standards and weight box-angles as shown. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  4. Pass inner draw bars between swivel plates and straps and secure with drilled bolt, nut and cotter. Note: To obtain more or less angle to the rear gangs than the front, the bolt may be moved to the rear or front hole as required by the operator.
  5. Move front harrow into positions and attach rear harrow to front by means of bolts through connection eyes and weight box angles.
  6. Attach outer draw bar pressure brackets as shown. The cutting depth of the inner end of rear gangs may be controlled by raising or lowering the brackets.
  7. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles as illustrated.

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Power Gang Angling Attachment (Special)

This attachment is furnished in a complete unit and can be connected to the harrow by removing the draft angles and connections of the crank angling mechanism, and bolting the power angling attachment to front harrow frame and cross bar as shown in illustration. The set lever should be attached to set lever bars at the second (or inside) hole at the front end of set lever bars for 5 and 6 ft. Harrows, and at the end hole for 7 and 8 ft. Harrows. If necessary, readjust snubbing plate so that the gangs are held at the required working level.

To angle the gangs, pull the adjusting rope and move tractor ahead until the desired working angle is obtained. To straighten the gangs, back the tractor.

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Rocking Scrapers (Special)

  1. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles by means of bolts through scraper bar hanger. The reinforcement plate goes inside the angle (See “6”, Illustration No. 1.) The straight end of the scraper spring rests on the weight box angle. Hook the scraper spring in spring holder.
  2. Attach scraper lever and stop as illustrated. Set lock nuts on the stop so that the scraper blades come to the extreme edge of the disks when the scraper is rocked.
  3. Adjust scraper blades to just clear the disks when at center, by using the clamp near the scraper bar hanger. Fasten ropes as shown.

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Full Blade Scrapers (Special)

Attach scraper bar, complete with scrapers, to rear weight box angles with bolts and space pipes. The space pipes go between the two angles.

Scrapers should be set (by means of bolts and slotted holes in scraper bar) to just clear the disk blades.

Center Tooth Attachment (Special)

(For Rear Harrow Only)

Bolt Center Tooth Attachment securely to rear harrow frame and cross bar angles, midway between the inner draw bars, as illustrated.

Note: For harrows equipped with 16” disk blades, the center tooth support bracket (P24325) is bolted to the angles with the offset UP, as illustrated. For 18” disk blades, P24325 is turned over and bolted to the angles with the offset DOWN.

Remove the inner draw bar swivel pins and attach the hitch to the tractor disk rear harrow by using the drilled bolts furnished with the hitch. Use the holes at the front end of the hitch angles that more nearly equal the distance between the inner draw bar swivel pin holes.

Adjust the hitch height by means of stop bolts and double nuts, the angles being held between the two nuts.

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INSTRUCTION FOR ADJUSTING AND OPERATING

Keep all moving parts well lubricated when the harrow is in use. Use the grease gun supplied with the tractor.

For best results, the draft angles (front frame) on the front harrow should be approximately level when the harrow is hitched to the tractor. If necessary, adjust tractor draw bar to obtain this result.

In practically all field work the gangs should run level and cut at an even depth. Adjust the front harrow gangs to suit by raising or lowering the pressure plate at center of front harrow frame.

The rear gangs may be leveled by raising or lowering the outer draw bar pressure plates. If the harrow ridges the soil between the rear gangs, the soil may be leveled by raising the inner end of the gangs, or by giving them less angle by moving the rear harrow frame forward at the three holes in the inner draw bars.

If the rear gangs do not fill a center depression left by the front harrow, reverse the above adjustment.

The adjustment at the outer ends of the rear harrow frame is for spacing the rear gangs closer or farther apart to meet field conditions, or for changing the trailing position of the rear harrow. The adjustment is carefully set and locked in place at the factory to meet average conditions. If any change is necessary move both gangs outward.

For all field work the upper collar on the gang adjusting screw should be placed at the hole nearest the hand crank so that if the harrow is backed the gangs may straighten. With forward movement the gangs will again assume angle. (The lower hold, next to the crank bearing, is intended only for demonstration purposes.)

Spotlight On: People

What We Really Lose

What We Really Lose

by:
from issue:

A few minutes with my Old Man will bring you stories Hollywood could never write. Stories of driving the canned milk to town at age 12 in the family pickup, not having a car to drive, driving new Cadillacs, eating home raised meals, eating at the Four Seasons as Presidents walked out while he was walking in, farming with only horses, then new tractors, then big tractors, then not farming, then doing it again with 50 year old tractors, then once more with no tractors.

Raising Chickens on the Schekel Farm

Raising Chickens on the Scheckel Farm

by:
from issue:

We kept our eye on this rooster. He was high entertainment for 3 boys and 3 younger sisters on that farm. We didn’t give him a name, just called him “Rooster,” and Rooster ruled. Other roosters moved out of his way. Hens cowered when Rooster appeared. My dog Browser wouldn’t go near Rooster. Rooster was invincible. Or so he thought.

A Small Good Thing

A Small Good Thing

We shared this video a while back, and now it has been released on Netflix. Check it out! — “A Small Good Thing” explores how the American Dream has reached its end and how for most of us, greater material wealth and upward mobility are no longer possible. To find out what is taking its place, this feature documentary follows six people in one community who have recast their lives so they can live with a sense of meaning.

In Memoriam Gene Logsdon

In Memoriam: Gene Logsdon

by:
from issue:

Gene didn’t see life (or much of anything else) through conventional eyes. I remember his comment about a course he took in psychology when he was trying to argue that animals did in fact have personalities (as any farmer or rancher will tell you is absolutely true), and the teacher basically told him to sit down and shut up because he didn’t know what he was taking about. Gene said: “I was so angry I left the course and then left the whole stupid school.”

Field Weeds and Street Boys

Field Weeds and Street Boys

by:
from issue:

So, our farming system to feed hungry street boys is to have them farm “weeds”. As we have all experienced, weeds are perfectly adapted to their climate, are robust and need no fertilizer nor any of the insecticides to enhance a good crop. Because we are aiming for long term diversified permaculture (this is a Shea native tree area), we needed some very quick marketable crops while we wait for the trees to mature. These field weeds intentionally farmed have a ready market in the big city 5 km north.

Rainshadow Organics Saralee and the Interns

Rainshadow Organics: Saralee & the Interns

Rainshadow Organics in Central Oregon is a really big small farm. As part of their mission to produce and promote good food, they participate in the Rogue Farm Corps internship program. This season they have 7 interns who made time during their lunch break to speak to us about the program.

Cindys Curds & Whey

Cindy’s Curds & Whey

by:
from issue:

The Burgess dairy farm and cheese factory are sustainable operations, meaning that nearly every by-product is re-used or recycled. For example, the usually-discarded whey goes to feed their own pigs, producing an exceptionally tasty, lean pork. Whey is the liquid portion of milk that develops after the milk protein has coagulated, and contains water, milk sugar, albuminous proteins, and minerals.

Building a Community, Building a Barn

Building a Community, Building a Barn

by:
from issue:

One of the most striking aspects of this development is the strength and confidence that comes from this communal way of living. While it is impressive to build a barn in a day it seems even more impressive to imagine building four barns or six, and all the rest of the needs of a community. For these young Amish families the vision of a shared agricultural community is strong, and clear.

American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm

American Milking Devons and the Flack Family Farm

by:
from issue:

On a sunny early September day I met Doug Flack at his biodynamic and organic farm, just South of Enosburg Falls. Doug is an American Milking Devon breeder with some of the best uddered and well behaved animals I have seen in the breed. The animals are beautifully integrated into his small and diversified farm. His system of management seems to bring out the best in the animals and his enthusiasm for Devon cattle is contagious.

Icelandic Sheep

Icelandic Sheep

by:
from issue:

I came to sheep farming from a background in the arts – with a passion for spinning and weaving. When we were able to leave our house in town to buy our small farm, a former dairy operation, I had no idea that the desire to have a couple of fiber animals would turn into full time shepherding. I had discovered Icelandic sheep, and was completely enamored of their beauty, their hardiness and their intelligence.

Another Barn Falls In

Another Barn Falls In

by:
from issue:

The barn was built around a century ago. A pair of double doors on the front flapped when the wind blew, and a short service door was on the side. It wasn’t a big barn, about 30 feet wide by 40 feet long with a small hay mow above. It had a couple of windows for light, and of course a window in the peak. There was a hitching rail outside that gave it a certain welcoming charm. A charm that seemed to say, “tie up to the rail, and c’mon in.”

Birth of a Farm

Birth of a Farm

by:
from issue:

“Isn’t it nice?” I offer to my supper companions, “to see our beautiful horses right while we’re eating? I feel like I’m on a Kentucky horse farm, with rolling bluegrass vistas.” I sweep my arm dramatically towards the view, the rigged up electric fence, the lawn straggling down to the pond, the three horses, one of whom is relieving herself at the moment. “Oh, huh,” he answers. “I was thinking it was more like a cheesy bed and breakfast.”

Students on the Lines

Students on the Lines & McD Grain Indicator Plate

from issue:

We conclude our online presentation of Volume 41 Issue 2 with beautiful photos from Walt Bernard’s Workhorse Workshops (www.workhorseworkshops.com) and some hard-to-find info on the McCormick-Deering Plain Fluted Feed “R” Grain Drill Grain Indicator Plate.

Fjordworks A History of Wrecks Part 3

Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 3

Working with horses can and should be safe and fun and profitable. The road to getting there need not be so fraught with danger and catastrophe as ours has been. I hope the telling of our story, in both its disasters and successes will not dissuade but rather inspire would-be teamsters to join the horse-powered ranks and avoid the pitfalls of the un-mentored greenhorn.

UCSC Farm & Garden Apprenticeship

UC Santa Cruz Farm & Garden Apprenticeship

UC Santa Cruz is thrilled to welcome applications to the 50th Anniversary year of the UCSC Farm and Garden Apprenticeship in Ecological Horticulture. The 39 apprentices each year arrive from all regions of the US and abroad, and represent a wide spectrum of ages, backgrounds, and interests. We have a range of course fee waivers available to support participation in the Apprenticeship.

The Value of What You Grow

The Value of What You Grow

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from issue:

There is a lot of value in the produce you sell that contrasts it from what someone can buy at the grocery store. First, you probably sell varieties that are different from what the grocery store sells. As you’ve probably tried dozens of different varieties, you can let the customer know why yours are different. Be brief and talk about things like taste and texture that are easy to get across.

Central Oregon Locavore Online Fundraiser

CENTRAL OREGON LOCAVORE NEEDS YOUR HELP! We at SFJ can relate.  Central Oregon Locavore is running a GoFundMe campaign, similar to our Kickstarter campaign earlier this year.  Follow the links to learn more about Locavore and to show your support. www.centraloregonlocavore.org www.gofundme.com/locavore Central Oregon Locavore works for an ecologically stable and socially just food system […]

LittleField Notes A Trip to the Auld Country

LittleField Notes: A Trip to the Auld Country

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from issue:

I’ve come to the north of Scotland this October almost by accident. And I find myself standing on the windy, rocky point of land that is northernmost on the isle of Great Britain. The sea lies before me: the flooding tide from the Atlantic pours in on my left where it collides with the North Sea pouring in from the right, the opposing currents whipping up a frenzy of white capped, tidal confusion: for sailors past and present, treacherous waters indeed. Straight ahead, across the seething waters of Pentland Firth lie the Orkney Islands, my ultimate destination.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT