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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PST

McCormick-Deering Tractor Disc Harrow No. 10-A

McCormick-Deering Tractor Disc Harrow No. 10-A

Small to mid-sized disc-harrows are a most useful tillage implement. Some farmers consider them indispensable. Discs such as the McD 10-A may be used with either tractors or big hitches of work horses. This tool will cut both plowed and unplowed ground. Ahead of the moldboard plow, the disc harrow is a valuable tool to cut up and free tough sod. When employed in tandem with spring tooth harrows, a great deal of work can be accomplished in much less time. Originally offered as a pamphlet to new owners of the implement, we offer this reprint unabridged because it may be helpful to someone struggling to make an old gang disc usable. SFJ

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INSTRUCTIONS FOR SETTING UP

  • Remove all wires and arrange parts conveniently.
  • Oil all bearings and moving parts as you proceed and see that they work freely.
  • Bolts must be used in the holes in which they are found, or in parts to which they are attached, unless otherwise shown.
  • Shaded portions in the illustrations show parts to be assembled. These must be placed on the machine in the order numbered.
  • In the following instructions, wherever the terms “left” and “right” are used, it should be understood to mean from a position behind and facing the machine.

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Front Harrow

(See Illustration No. 1)

  1. Attach front harrow frame to gangs with bolts located in bearings. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  2. Bolt draft angles, assembled with gang adjusting screw adjusting screw and set levers, to frame and cross bar as illustrated. Note: The gang adjusting screw bearing is furnished assembled in lower holes in adjusting screw standards. This bearing may be moved to upper holes, if more convenient for the operator (See “A”, Illustration No. 1.)
  3. Secure lower end of adjusting screw standard braces to frame angles. See that nuts on adjusting screw standard brace truss are tight.
  4. Slip set lever bars through slots in snubbing plate and secure to gang bearings with drilled bolts. Be sure bow in set lever bars is UP, exactly as illustrated. Attach set lever bars to set levers at the second (or inside) hole at front end of set lever bars for 5-ft. And 6-ft. Harrows, and at the end hole for 7-ft. And 8-ft Harrows. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  5. Secure inner and outer standard braces as shown.
  6. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles as illustrated. The reinforcement plates go inside the weight box angle.

Rear Harrow

(See Illustration No. 2)

  1. Attach rear harrow frame to gangs with bolts located in bearings. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  2. Secure outer standard braces as illustrated.
  3. Attach outer draw bars, right and left, to inner gang bearings with bolts located in bearings. Attach draw bars to standards and weight box-angles as shown. Tighten nuts securely and spread cotters.
  4. Pass inner draw bars between swivel plates and straps and secure with drilled bolt, nut and cotter. Note: To obtain more or less angle to the rear gangs than the front, the bolt may be moved to the rear or front hole as required by the operator.
  5. Move front harrow into positions and attach rear harrow to front by means of bolts through connection eyes and weight box angles.
  6. Attach outer draw bar pressure brackets as shown. The cutting depth of the inner end of rear gangs may be controlled by raising or lowering the brackets.
  7. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles as illustrated.

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Power Gang Angling Attachment (Special)

This attachment is furnished in a complete unit and can be connected to the harrow by removing the draft angles and connections of the crank angling mechanism, and bolting the power angling attachment to front harrow frame and cross bar as shown in illustration. The set lever should be attached to set lever bars at the second (or inside) hole at the front end of set lever bars for 5 and 6 ft. Harrows, and at the end hole for 7 and 8 ft. Harrows. If necessary, readjust snubbing plate so that the gangs are held at the required working level.

To angle the gangs, pull the adjusting rope and move tractor ahead until the desired working angle is obtained. To straighten the gangs, back the tractor.

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Rocking Scrapers (Special)

  1. Attach scrapers to rear weight box angles by means of bolts through scraper bar hanger. The reinforcement plate goes inside the angle (See “6”, Illustration No. 1.) The straight end of the scraper spring rests on the weight box angle. Hook the scraper spring in spring holder.
  2. Attach scraper lever and stop as illustrated. Set lock nuts on the stop so that the scraper blades come to the extreme edge of the disks when the scraper is rocked.
  3. Adjust scraper blades to just clear the disks when at center, by using the clamp near the scraper bar hanger. Fasten ropes as shown.

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Full Blade Scrapers (Special)

Attach scraper bar, complete with scrapers, to rear weight box angles with bolts and space pipes. The space pipes go between the two angles.

Scrapers should be set (by means of bolts and slotted holes in scraper bar) to just clear the disk blades.

Center Tooth Attachment (Special)

(For Rear Harrow Only)

Bolt Center Tooth Attachment securely to rear harrow frame and cross bar angles, midway between the inner draw bars, as illustrated.

Note: For harrows equipped with 16” disk blades, the center tooth support bracket (P24325) is bolted to the angles with the offset UP, as illustrated. For 18” disk blades, P24325 is turned over and bolted to the angles with the offset DOWN.

Remove the inner draw bar swivel pins and attach the hitch to the tractor disk rear harrow by using the drilled bolts furnished with the hitch. Use the holes at the front end of the hitch angles that more nearly equal the distance between the inner draw bar swivel pin holes.

Adjust the hitch height by means of stop bolts and double nuts, the angles being held between the two nuts.

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INSTRUCTION FOR ADJUSTING AND OPERATING

Keep all moving parts well lubricated when the harrow is in use. Use the grease gun supplied with the tractor.

For best results, the draft angles (front frame) on the front harrow should be approximately level when the harrow is hitched to the tractor. If necessary, adjust tractor draw bar to obtain this result.

In practically all field work the gangs should run level and cut at an even depth. Adjust the front harrow gangs to suit by raising or lowering the pressure plate at center of front harrow frame.

The rear gangs may be leveled by raising or lowering the outer draw bar pressure plates. If the harrow ridges the soil between the rear gangs, the soil may be leveled by raising the inner end of the gangs, or by giving them less angle by moving the rear harrow frame forward at the three holes in the inner draw bars.

If the rear gangs do not fill a center depression left by the front harrow, reverse the above adjustment.

The adjustment at the outer ends of the rear harrow frame is for spacing the rear gangs closer or farther apart to meet field conditions, or for changing the trailing position of the rear harrow. The adjustment is carefully set and locked in place at the factory to meet average conditions. If any change is necessary move both gangs outward.

For all field work the upper collar on the gang adjusting screw should be placed at the hole nearest the hand crank so that if the harrow is backed the gangs may straighten. With forward movement the gangs will again assume angle. (The lower hold, next to the crank bearing, is intended only for demonstration purposes.)

Spotlight On: Livestock

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Cheese

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Cheese

by:
from issue:

Yogurt making is the perfect introduction into the world of cultured dairy products and cheese-making. You are handling milk properly, becoming proficient at sanitizing pots and utensils, and learning the principles of culturing milk. Doing these things regularly, perfecting your methods, sets you up for cheese-making very well. Cheese-making involves the addition of a few more steps beyond the culturing.

Types and Breeds of Poultry

From Dusty Shelves: A 1924 article on chicken breeds.

Chicken Guano: Top-Notch Fertilizer

Whoever thought I’d be singing the praises of chicken poop? I am, and I’m not the only one. Chickens are walking nitrogen-rich manure bins.

Farmrun On the Anatomy of Thrift

On the Anatomy of Thrift: Side Butchery

On the Anatomy of Thrift is an instructional series Farmrun created with Farmstead Meatsmith. Their principal intention is instruction in the matters of traditional pork processing. In a broader and more honest context, OAT is a deeply philosophical manifesto on the subject of eating animals.

Horse Breeding

This is an excerpt from Horse Breeding by M.W. Harper, a Dept. of Agriculture Bulletin from January 1928. In breeding horses the perfection of the animals selected should be carefully considered. Occasionally stallions are selected on the basis of their pedigree. Such practice may prove disappointing, for many inferior individuals are recorded merely because such […]

The Milk and Human Kindness Stanchion Floor

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Friends with Your Wild Heifer

by:
from issue:

So let’s just say this is your first experience with cows, you’ve gone to your local dairy farm, purchased a beautiful bred heifer who is very skittish, has never had a rope on her, or been handled or led, and you’re making arrangements to bring her home. It ought to be dawning on you at this point that you need to safely and securely convey this heifer to your farm and then you need to keep her confined until she begins to calm down enough that she knows she’s home, and she knows where she gets fed.

The Mule Part 1

The Mule – Part 1

by:
from issue:

There is no more useful or willing animal than the Mule. And perhaps there is no other animal so much abused, or so little cared for. Popular opinion of his nature has not been favorable; and he has had to plod and work through life against the prejudices of the ignorant. Still, he has been the great friend of man, in war and in peace serving him well and faithfully. If he could tell man what he most needed it would be kind treatment.

My First Team of Workhorses

My First Team of Workhorses

by:
from issue:

In A Greenhorn Tries Draft Horses, a greenhorn (myself) tried a single work horse named Lady for farm and woods work. It was probably natural that, having acquired some experience with one horse, I should want to see what it was like to use two. Perhaps it is more exciting to see a good team pull together, and there is the added challenge to the teamster of making certain that the horses pull smoothly rather than seesaw.

Ask A Teamster Halters Off

Ask A Teamster: Halters Off!

When my friend and mentor, the late Addie Funk, first started helping me with my horses, he suggested that we get rid of my halter ropes with snaps and braid lead ropes on to all the halters permanently. Actually as I think about it, it was more than a suggestion. Knowing him, he probably just braided the new ropes on, confident that anyone with any sense would be pleased with the improvement. In any case, when the task was completed I clearly remember him saying to me, “Now nobody will turn a horse loose around here with a halter on.”

How Big Should a Draft Horse Be

How Big Should A Draft Horse Be?

from issue:

As evidenced by our letters and the frequent comments of contributors to this magazine, the question of size in draft horses is a hot issue. I suppose we’d all like to think that it’s a contemporary subject, one which did not trouble people back when horses were the norm. The BREEDER’S GAZETTE gathered the opinions of the most respected Draft horsemen of the 1910’s on the subject of how big a draft horse should be and we’ve reprinted them here. As you can see the subject has provided controversy for a long time and I’m sure it will continue.

Lineback Cattle

Lineback Cattle

by:
from issue:

Cattle with lineback color patterns have occurred throughout the world in many breeds. In some cases this is a matter of random selection. In others, the markings are a distinct characteristic of the breed; while in some it is one of a number of patterns common to a local type. Considering that livestock of all classes have been imported to the United States, it is not surprising that we have our own Lineback breed.

Ask A Teamster Ten Common Wrecks With Driving Horses

Ask A Teamster: Ten Common Wrecks with Driving Horses

One of the things I’ve learned over time is that the truly great teamsters rarely – if ever – have upset horses, close calls, mishaps or wrecks, while the less meticulous horsemen often do. Even though it may take a few minutes longer, the master teamsters constantly follow a series of seemingly minute, endlessly detailed, but always wise safety tips. Here are 10 of them:

New York Organic Grazing Dairy

New York Organic Grazing Dairy

by:
from issue:

Our farm, here in the center of New York State, consists of 101 acres, about 90 in grass, the rest some woods and swamp. It is inhabited by forty-six jersey cows, twelve breeding ace heifers, one bull, and because it is calving season — an increasing number of calves. Also, four Belgian mares and a couple of buggy horses. Last, and possibly least — the farmer, farmer’s wife, and five grown children.

Happs Plowing A Chance to Share

Happ’s Plowing: A Chance to Share

by:
from issue:

Dinnertime rolled around before we could get people and horses off the field so that results of judging could be announced. I learned a lot that day, one thing being that people were there to share; not many took the competition side of the competition very seriously. Don Anderson of Toledo, WA was our judge — with a tough job handed to him. Everyone was helping each other so he had to really stay on his toes to know who had done what on the various plots.

Words for the Novice Teamster

Words for the Novice Teamster

by:
from issue:

Many people who are new to the world of draft horses are intimidated by what seems to them to be a foreign language. This “workhorse language” can be frustrating for novices who would like to use draft horses, or who would just like to understand what people who do use them are talking about. The knowledge of some basic draft horse terminology can end most of the beginner’s confusion about the special jargon used in this trade.

Horseshoeing Part 3B

Horseshoeing Part 3B

Besides good, tough iron for the shoe, we need an anvil with a round horn and a small hole at one end, a round-headed turning-hammer, a round sledge, a stamping hammer, a pritchel of good steel, and, if a fullered shoe is to be made, a round fuller. Bodily activity and, above all else, a good eye for measurement are not only desirable, but necessary. A shoe should be made thoughtfully, but yet quickly enough to make the most of the heat.

Littlefield Notes Making Your Horses Work For You

LittleField Notes: Making Your Horses Work For You Part 1

by:
from issue:

The practical everyday working of horses and mules in harness has always been at the heart of what the Small Farmer’s Journal is about. And like the Journal, a good horse powered farm keeps the horses at the center: the working nucleus of the farm. All the tractive effort for the pulling of machines, hauling in of crops, hauling out of manures, harvesting and planting is done as much as is practicable with the horses.

Interpreting Your Horse's Body Language

Interpreting Your Horse’s Body Language

by:
from issue:

The person who works closely with horses usually develops an intuitive feel for their well-being, and is able to sense when one of them is sick, by picking up the subtle clues from the horse’s body language. A good rider can tell when his mount is having an off day, just by small differences in how the horse travels or carries himself, or responds to things happening around him. And when at rest, in stall or pasture, the horse can also give you clues as to his mental and physical state.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT