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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

This piece on the McCormick-Deering originally appeared in Volume 28 Issue 3 of the Small Farmer’s Journal and is copyrighted in this form thereto.
Click HERE to view that issue of the Small Farmer’s Journal in our online bookstore.

limesprdr.1

LUBRICATION

All bearings and moving parts should be lubricated as indicated in Illustration 1.

limesprdr.2

ADJUSTING

This Trailing Lime Spreader is designed to be operated with the fans level when the wagon or truck is empty.

The length of drawbars should be adjusted by using the holes in rear end so that front edge of hopper will just clear the wagon or truck bed.

The holes in hitch clamp, together with the holes in quadrant, provide adjustment for leveling the spreader.

limesprdr.3

OPERATING

To avoid unnecessary wear on parts, throw spreader out of gear when transporting.

At a speed of five miles per hour, the width of cast is approximately 21 feet, while a slower speed will give a lesser cast.

The amount of material spread per acre is regulated by slides in the bottom of hopper and the speed of travel. Both slides should be opened the same distance to obtain an equal distribution of material.

When feed openings are set at 2 ¼”, this machine will spread approximately two tons of crushed limestone per acre when traveling at a speed of five miles per hour. This quantity will vary, depending upon the weight of the material and its condition, particularly the moisture content.

For maximum service a speed not exceeding five miles per hour is recommended.

limesprdr.4

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SETTING UP

Lubricate all bearings and moving parts as you proceed, and see that they work freely.

Bolts must be used in the holes in which they are found, or in parts to which they are attached, unless otherwise shown. Leave nuts loose until all parts of any assembly are in place, then tighten.

Shaded portions in illustrations show parts to be assembled; these must be placed on machine in the order numbered.

Wherever the terms “Right” and “Left” are used, it should be understood to mean from a position behind and facing the machine.

We reserve the right to make changes or improvements in the design or construction of any part without incurring the obligation to install such changes on any machine previously delivered.

See Illustration 3

1.With drawbars straddling the quadrant, bolt rear end of drawbars to pivot strap and quadrant.

2. Remove pins from ends of axle. Put on wheels. (Washer must be in place between cotter in axle and inner end of each wheel hub.) The ratchet caps are right and left and must be so placed. Replace pins through ratchet caps and axle. Secure pins with cotters.

3. Remove set screws, agitator pins, spacer collar and cupped washer from agitator shaft. Put hopper in place and bolt it to bed angle. Put felt washer in cupped washer and place on agitator shaft with felt washer next to hopper bottom. Replace spacer collar, agitator pins and set screws in agitator shaft. See Illustration 3A.

4. Bolt brace to front end of hopper and to quadrant.

5. Assemble hitch clamp on rear cross member of wagon or truck bed.

6. Hitch spreader to hitch clamp.

PARTS LIST AND ILLUSTRATIONS

The following contain parts list and illustrations of “exploded” views of the various units disassembled so that parts wanted may be readily located.

limesprdr.5limesprdr.6

HOPPER

Ref. No. Description
1 Hopper, cp.
2 Carriage bolt, 5/16 x 5/8”
3 Square nut, 5/16”
4 Standard lock washer, 5/16”
5 Quantity slide
6 Carriage bolt, 5/16 x ¾”
7 Wing nut
8 Washer, 13/32” rd. hole x 7/8” x 16 ga.
9 Hopper brace, front
10 Machine bolt, ½ x 1 ¼”
11 Lock washer, ½”
12 Square nut, ½”
limesprdr.7
MAIN FRAME AND AXLE
1 Main axle
2 Frame, cp.
3 Pin
4 Washer
5 Cotter, ¼ x 2”
6 Lubrication fitting, 1/8”, straight
7 Cotter, 1/8 x ¾”
8 Pin
9 Axle box
10 Chain tightener arm
11 Chain tightener roller
12 Washer plate
13 Cotter, 3/16 x 1”
14 Chain tightener spring
15 Drive sprocket
16 Set screw, ½ x 1” N.C. (sq. hd., cup point)
17 Drive chain, 27 No. 55 steel links
18 Set screw, ½ x ¾” N.C. (sq. hd., cup point)
19 Axle collar
20 Chain tightener spring anchor pin
21 Washer
limesprdr.8
FANS AND COUNTERSHAFT
1 Fan blade, R.H.
2 Agitator finger
3 Spacer
4 Agitator shaft
5 Set screw, 3/8 x ½” N.C. (sq. hd., cup point)
6 Lubrication fitting, 1/8”, straight
7 Agitator bevel gear bearing bracket
8 Square nut, 3/8”
9 Lock washer, 3/8”
10 Machine bolt, 3/8 x 1 ¼”
11 Machine bolt, 3/8 x 1 ½”
12 Lock washer 3/8”
13 Square nut, 3/8”
14 Cotter, 3/16 x 1 ½”
15 Washer
16 Fan bevel pinion
17 Lubrication fitting, 1/8”, straight
18 Fan bevel gear
19 Pin
20 Cotter, 1/8 x ¾”
21 Throw-out cam
22 Clutch spring
23 Clutch yoke cp. with shaft
24 Washer
25 Countershaft bearing with fan shaft
26 Driving pins
27 Stay pin
28 Washer
29 Cotter, ¼ x 1 ½”
30 Countershaft
31 Cupped washer
32 Felt washer
33 Pin
34 Cotter, 1/8 x ¾”
35 Pin
36 Lock washer, 3/8”
37 Machine bolt, 3/8 x 1 ¼”
38 Square nut, 3/8”
39 Shifter clutch
40 Drive sprocket clutch
41 Fan blade, L.H.
42 Lubrication fitting, 1/8”, straight
43 Agitator bevel gear
44 Agitator bevel pinion
45 Fan gear guard, L.H.
46 Fan gear guard, R.H.
47 Yoke shaft cam pin
limesprdr.9

WHEELS

1 Steel wheel with lugs
2 Wheel lug
3 Ratchet cap, L.H.
4 Pawl for left hub cap
5 Spring
6 Wheel, less hub (for pneumatic tire)
7 Wheel, with hub (for pneumatic tire)
8 Hub for pneumatic tire wheel
9 Machine bolt, 7/16 x 1 ¼”
10 Lock washer, 7/16”
11 Square nut, 7/16”
12 Ratchet cap, R.H.
13 Pin
14 Cotter, 1/8 x ¾”
15 Spring
16 Pawl for right hub cap
limesprdr.10
HITCH PARTS
1 Machine bolt, ½ x 1 ¾”
2 Machine bolt, ½ x 2”
3 Drawbar
4 Lock washer, ½”
5 Square nut, ½”
6 Hitch pin
7 Quack-attachable cotter
8 Spacer
9 Hitch clamp, lower
10 Machine bolt, 5/8 x 4” (2 5/8” thread)
11 Square nut, 5/8”
12 Lock washer, 5/8”
13 Hitch clamp, upper
14 Hitch clamp eyebolt

Spotlight On: Equipment & Facilities

John Deere Model A Tractor

from issue:

Your John Deere Tractor has a range of speeds. These various speeds not only give you the flexibility and adaptability you want, but also they enable you to balance the load and the speed for maximum economy. However, if you are handling a light load and want to travel at slow speed, it is far better to put your tractor into the gear which gives you the speed you want than to use a higher gear and throttle down.

Haying With Horses

Haying With Horses

If the reader is considering the construction of a barn we encourage you to give more than passing thought to allowing the structure of the gable to be open enough to accommodate the hanging of a trolley track. It is difficult or impossible to retrofit a truss-built barn, which may have many supports crisscrossing the inside gable, to receive hay jags. At least allowing for the option in a new construction design will leave the option for loose hay systems in the future.

The Tip Cart

The Tip Cart

by:
from issue:

When horses were the main source of power on every farm, in the British Isles it was the tip-cart, rather than the wagon which was the most common vehicle, and for anyone farming with horses, it is still an extremely useful and versatile piece of equipment. The farm cart was used all over the country, indeed in some places wagons were scarcely used at all, and many small farms in other areas only used carts.

I Built My Own Buckrake

I Built My Own Buckrake

by:
from issue:

One of the fun things about horse farming is the simplicity of many of the machines. This opens the door for tinkerers like me to express themselves. Sometimes it is just plain nice to take a proven design and build one of your own. Last spring I did just that. I built my own buckrake. I’m proud of the fact that it worked as it should and that my rudimentary carpentry skills produced it.

The New Idea No5 Transplanter

The NEW IDEA No. 5 Transplanter

from issue:

The planting distances or intervals at which the water is released, is controlled by the gear and pinions under the shield near the driver’s right foot. The large, flat-faced gear should be so turned that the arrow on the back points straight up. The numbers on either side of the arrow will then be so arranged that the number 1, 2, 3 and 4 will be on the side of the water trip lever and will denote the various positions in which the Driven Pinion meshes with the gear.

Horsedrawn Dempster Well Driller

Horsedrawn Dempster Well Driller

by:
from issue:

The driller is like an auger type post hole digger powered by one horse walking around the machine. The gear is stationary. The platform and everything on it (including operators) goes around and around with the horse. The auger shaft is clamped to the platform so the auger makes one revolution as the horse makes one revolution. The gears operate a winch. It appears the winch can also be cranked by hand.

Homemade Cheese Press

Homemade Cheese Press

by:
from issue:

On the Gies farmstead we occasionally wallow in goat milk. From it we make our own butter, yogurt and cheese as well as drink some. This has prompted me to build a little cheese press to help with the extra milk. The press is made from inexpensive 1/2 inch thick plastic cutting boards used for the top and bottom plates and pressure disks, white pvc pipe, and a plastic floor drain cap.

McD Lime Spreader

Parts lists and illustrations are included in this comprehensive overview

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Step Ahead: 23rd Annual Horse Progress Days 2016

by:
from issue:

I had only been to Horse Progress Days once before, at Mount Hope, Ohio in 2008. It had been an eye-opener, showing how strong and in touch with sustainable farming values the Amish are, and how innovative and sensible their efforts could be. So at the 23rd annual event in Howe, Indiana, I was there partly looking for signs of continuity, and partly for signs of change. Right off I spotted an Amish man with a Blue Tooth in his ear, talking as he walked along.

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

Horse Powered Snow Scoop

by:
from issue:

The scoop has two steel sides about 5 feet apart sitting on steel runners made out of heavy 2 X 2 angle iron, there is a blade that is lowered and raised by use of a foot release which allows the weight of the blade to lower it and then lock in the down position and the forward motion of the horses to raise it and lock it in the up position. This is accomplished by a clever pivoting action where the tongue attaches to the snow scoop.

Farm Drum 28 Eds Wester Star Custom Forecart

Farm Drum #28: Ed’s Western Star Custom Forecart

Lynn Miller and Ed Joseph examine a custom horse-drawn Forecart built by Ed’s company, Western Star Implement Co.

Portable Poultry

Portable Poultry

An important feature of the range shelter described in this circular is that it is portable. Two men by inserting 2x4s through the holes located just below the roost supports and next to the center uprights can easily pick up and move it from one location to another. Frequent moving of the shelter prevents excessive accumulation of droppings in its vicinity which are a menace to the health of the birds. Better use will be made by the birds of the natural green feed produced on the range if the houses are moved often.

The Milk and Human Kindness Stanchion Floor

The Milk and Human Kindness: Plans for an Old Style Wooden Stanchion Floor

by:
from issue:

The basic needs that we are addressing here are as follows: To create a sunny, airy (not drafty), dry, convenient, accessible place to bring in our cow or cows, with or without calves, to be comfortably and easily secured for milking and other purposes such as vet checks, AI breeding, etc. where both you and your cow feel secure and content. A place that is functional, clean, warm and inviting in every way.

Haying With Horses

Hitching Horses To A Mower

When hitching to the mower, first make sure it’s on level ground and out of gear. The cutter bar should be fastened up in the vertical or carrier position. This is for safety of all people in attendance during hitching.

Two Log Cart Designs from Canada

Two Log Cart Designs from Canada

by:
from issue:

The problem horseloggers face is reducing skidding friction yet maintaining enough friction for holdback on steep skids. The cart had to be as simple and maneuverable as the basic two wheel log arch which dangles logs on chokers. We wanted it to be light, low, with no tongue weight, no lift motor to maintain, no arch to jam up and throw the teamster in a turn, and a low center of draft.

Build Your Own Butter Churn

Build Your Own Butter Churn

by:
from issue:

Fresh butter melting on hot homemade bread… Isn’t that the homesteader’s dream? A cheap two-gallon stock pot from the local chain store got me started in churn building. It was thin stainless steel and cost less than ten bucks. I carted it home wondering what I might find in my junk pile to run the thing. I found an old squirrel cage fan and pulled the little motor to test it. I figure that if it could turn a six-inch fan, it could turn a two-inch impeller.

Cultivating Questions The Cost of Working Horses

Cultivating Questions: The Cost of Working Horses

Thanks to the many resources available in the new millennium, it is relatively easy for new and transitioning farmers to learn the business of small-scale organic vegetable production. Economic models of horse-powered market gardens, however, are still few and far between. To fill that information hole, I asked three experienced farmers to join me in tracking work horse hours, expenses and labor over a two-year period and to share the results in the Small Farmer’s Journal.

Geiss New-Made Hay Loader

Gies’ New-Made Hayloader

by:
from issue:

I was sitting on a 5 gallon bucket staring at the hayloader. I had a significant amount of time and money invested. My wife, the great motivating influence in my life, walked up and asked what I was thinking. I was thinking about dropping the whole project and I told her so. She told me that it had better work since I had spent so much money and time on it already. She doesn’t talk that way very often so I figured I had better come up with a solution.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT