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New Idea Manure Spreaders

Setting Up and Operating No. 10A

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Preface: This is a reprint of the first half of the named manual. The entire manual with the parts listing is available through SFJ. You will note that the instructions presume you have purchased a new spreader and need to assemble it. Not likely today, but we do think this information may be most helpful to anyone needing to repair, restore and/or operate this fine implement. SFJ

Setting Up Instructions

SHIPPING BUNDLES

  • 1 Bottom parts attached
  • 1 Pair Sides parts attached
  • 1 Upper Cylinder Bundle
  • 1 Lower Cylinder Bundle
  • 1 Distributer
  • 1 Sprocket Wheel Bundle
  • 1 Chain Conveyor
  • 1 Front Axle Bundle
  • 1 Rear Axle Bundle
  • 2 Bundle Shields
  • 1 Pole (or Tractor Hitch)
  • 1 Doubletree Bundle
  • 1 Feed and Drive Rod Bundle
  • 1 Bundle Chain and Levers
  • 1 Pair Flared Side Boards
  • 1 Endgate Bundle
  • 4 Steel Wheels or
  • 4 Cast Wheel Hubs and 4 Disc Wheels

Cut the wires on all of the various bundles that comprise the spreader and lay all of the parts out separately so they can be easily found when ready to bolt them in place.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Lay the bottom on a pair of trestles or boxes and remove the black paint from the end of the feed shaft that projects to the right of the bottom. Insert angle fittings in the feed shaft bearings. Lay the sides on the bottom and bolt the flared side boards “A”, Fig. 1 in place. Insert the angle feed bearings in the right side as shown “B”, Fig. 2. With this bearing in place bolt the side to the bottom starting at the rear feed shaft. Register the bolt holes with a punch if necessary and put all bolts in loose. Bolts will be found in the bag packed in the conveyor. Then bolt the right side brace “C”, Fig. 1 to the side and bottom. Now draw all of the side bolts and the bolts in the side brace up tight. Be sure that there are lock washers under all of the nuts. Now put on the left side in the same manner as described above for the right side except there is no feed shaft bearing. Make sure that the feed shaft turns freely after the sides have been bolted in place.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Bolt the angle arch and upper cylinder shields in place as shown Fig. 2. Bolts will be found in bag wired in conveyor bundle. The two longer bolts are for the point where the upper cylinder shields bolt on to the angle arch. Be sure that all bolts are drawn up tight and that there are lock washers under parts where metal is bolted against metal.

Remove the front bolts and loosen the rear bolts in each of the tie bars that hold the front axle forks together. The tie bars will then hang down.

Get the front axle and bolster assembly and oil all points of the steering mechanism and also put some oil or grease on the guide plates and front axle forks. Then put the front axle in place as shown in Fig. 1. Now get the front wheels and clean all paint out of the bore of the wheel as well as off of the front axle spindles. Force grease into the hub of the front wheels and then put the front wheels in place on the axles and put the take up washer and retaining pin in place. Be sure the hub caps are securely attached to the front wheels.

Bolt the front end gate in place and put the bolts in from the outside, putting the upper ones in first as that will register the bolt holes. Draw all bolts up tight. Then put on the seat iron, seat, oil can holder, and the tool box.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Lay the main axle under the spreader and insert the oil lines and fittings. When bolting the axle bearing clamp straps to the sides be sure to also attach the oil line support “A” Fig. 2A. Attach oil line lubrication brackets to sides and form oil lines as illustrated in Fig. 2A. Do not allow lines to project beyond side angles.

Be sure to cut the wires that hold the driving pawls in place during shipment on both the feed cam and sprocket wheel hub. Attach the rear axle to the spreader sides as shown in Fig. 2. Be sure the bolts that hold this rear axle in place are drawn up good and tight. Then bolt the large sprocket wheel to the hub on the left side of the spreader and make sure that the flanged portion of the wheel comes next to the flanged portion of the hub or the teeth will stand backward.

Now remove the trestles or boxes from under the bottom and set one under each end of the main axle.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Lay the conveyor in the bed as shown in Fig. 3 with part of the conveyor unrolled pointing to the feed wheels (rear). Keep unrolling the conveyor putting it squarely over the feed wheels and pulling it under the bottom and passing it under the axle until the end of the conveyor is near the front of the machine. Then run the other end of the conveyor between the bottom and the endgate and couple both ends together, driving the links with a hammer. Be sure the conveyor is in the machine so that the bars travel squarely over the feed wheels and not one side ahead of the other. Chain breakage is sure to be the result by running the bars askew. The conveyor should now appear as shown in Fig. 4 and not like Fig. 5 which is incorrect.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

CONVEYOR IN CORRECT

The side near the feeding mechanism has been cut away to show the feed shaft at the feed wheels with the conveyor in the correct position. Note that the bar “C” has the wide portion “A” rearward or in the direction of the travel of the chain, thus pushing the manure rearward and toward the cylinder. This also gives the proper bracing to the riveting of the attachment links, preventing link breakage. A conveyor properly put in should never give any trouble.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

CONVEYOR IN WRONG

Here the bar “C” has the thin portion “B” rearward or in the direction of the travel of the chain. This gives no support to the rivets in the attachment links and is liable to cause them to break on a heavy pull.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Next attach the foot board and put the front conveyor idlers in place. Conveyor idlers are easily put in place if proper instructions are followed. Turn the conveyor so that the bars are about 6” from the front end of the bottom. Next take the conveyor idlers under the bottom and hook the sprocket into the end of the conveyor chain, raise it so the bracket is above the lip of the side sill, draw forward and bolt aside of the footboard support angle, (the bolts should be put in from the inside, that is the nuts should be on the outside of the machine). The conveyor idlers and foot board support angles are held in place by the same bolts. Bolt the front conveyor hold down irons or chain slides to the lower front side of the endgate. Fig. 3A. The purpose of these irons are to hold the conveyor down on to the front end of the bottom. Then bolt the conveyor slides in place under the center of the bottom.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Remove the bars from the upper cylinder assembly and bolt the upper cylinder to the angle arch as shown in Fig. 6. Be sure the bearing plates are bolted to the outside of the arch and that these plates fit squarely on the arch. Insert the 1/8 x 1 1/4 nipple and coupling with angle fitting in the left bearing. Now bolt the upper cylinder bars to the head. Be sure the bolts are drawn up tight and that there are lock washers under all of the bolt heads.

Remove the rear end angles and other parts from the rear end of the sides so as to open up the slots to receive the lower cylinder as shown in Fig. 6. Lay the cylinder assembly on the side sills, with the two sprocket wheels to the left and the distributer sprocket wheel to the right. Do not remove any of the sprocket wheels from the shaft. Insert the 1/8 x 2 nipple and coupling with angle fitting in the left bearing. Now remove the bolts in the bearing plates, then slide the cylinder in place, making sure that the bearing plates are on the outside of the sides. Now replace the parts previously removed from the sides and then bolt the main cylinder bearing plates in place, first putting all bolts in loose. After the bolts are in place then draw each one up tight.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Now turn the cylinder bars one at a time so that the teeth will stand outward. After turning the bars be sure to bolt it on the heads in the same place as it was before turning. Be sure that there are lock washers under each of the bolt heads. The finished assembly should now appear as shown in Fig. 7 and the bars on both upper and lower cylinder should stand in relations to each other as shown in Fig. 8.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Clean the end of the feed shaft carefully and insert the key in the shaft, (key will be found in a small bag in the conveyor). Clean all paint from the bore of ratchet wheel and put the ratchet wheel on the feed shaft hub first so that the hub comes next to the bearing in the sill of the machine. The washer for the feed shaft is to take up end play if any. Use it if needed, otherwise not.

Get the feed arm assembly and thoroughly clean all paint out of the bore of the feed arm casting and see that the oil hole is clear. Do not take any of the feed arm parts apart. Remove bolts from post of L-338 and start them in the sides from the inside of the bed so they protrude through the wood a little.

Put the feed arm on the feed shaft, oiling the shaft as it is put on and be sure that it works freely. Bolt ratchet post L-338 in place. Oil feed arm bearing through oiler and also oil roller on each side and spin the roller so oil works into the bearing, see Fig. 9.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Bolt the feed rod, feed lever and feed sector (feed lever goes on inside of sector) in place as shown in Fig. 10 and connect the feed rod to the feed arm. Now adjust the feed. Place the feed lever in the first notch of the sector and check to see if there is 1/4” clearance between the roller of the feed arm and the lobe of the feed cam. If there is not 1/4” clearance then adjust the set collar on the feed rod so as to get the desired results. The feed arm slide collar should slide freely on the feed rod. Be sure that the entire feed mechanism works freely in all respects.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Put the distributer in place with sprocket to the right, bolting the bearing plates to the rear side sills. The bearing plates are to go on the inside of the sill. See Figs. 9A and 9B. Be sure that there are lock washers under all of the nuts. Insert straight fittings in the bearings. Oil the upper cylinder, main cylinder and distributer bearings and turn all of these parts rapidly so that the oils works down into the bearings. Put on the distributer chain (43 links of No. 52 chain). The chain should be put on so that the open part of the link will be up and leading in the direction of travel, See Fig. 12. Now bolt all of the feed shields and distributer chain shields in place as shown in Fig. 10. When bolting the distributer chain shield in place, also attach the distributer chain tightener. Be sure to get the chain tightener on so that the lip of the slide is squarely underneath the side sill angle.

New Idea Manure Spreaders

Now bolt the drive chain assembly, including the drive arm, auxiliary drive arm and chain straddler in place as shown in Fig. 11. Do not take any of the chain assembly apart as it is all properly assembled at the factory and is ready to bolt on. If chain is taken apart put it on the sprockets as illustrated in Figs. 11 and 13

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