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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

New Idea Mower

New Idea Mower

Instructions for Setting Up and Operating the

NEW IDEA MOWER

This material is also available from the SFJ Equipment Manual Reprint service. Note, it is written with the assumption that you are the buyer of a new mower which requires some assembly. That not being the case, we feel you will benefit from this material, in this form, if you want to put your New Idea mower to use. Thank you, SFJ

Before starting be sure to put oil in gear case as instructed under item 17.

Cut all wires on the various bundles and lay out all loose parts so they may be readily seen. Thoroughly oil all working parts and the cutting mechanism as you proceed in setting up the mower.

New Idea Mower

New Idea Mower

READ THE INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE YOU START TO SET UP THE MOWER.

1 and 2. Figs 1 and 2 — Bolt raising lever quadrant and levers to frame attaching lift link to raising lever arm. Use square head counter sunk bolts found in their respective holes in raising lever quadrant. Use washer and cotter on end of stud.

3. Fig. 1 — Place pole in socket, using bolts found in tool box; put flat washers next to nut on underside of pole. Hook of bolt in front end of pole should be up.

NOTE: For proper line-up of the cutter bar the front end of pole should be 32” from the ground.

4. Fig. 1 — Bolt tilt lever and sector to ear on frame with small bolt. Large bolt goes through lever and sector. Be sure to have bushing in lever. Fasten tilt rod to lever and to arm on inner shoe hinge.

5. Fig. 1 — Bolt gag lever to inner shoe. Slide knife in cutter bar; see that it moves freely back and forth; oil all wearing parts thoroughly using a good grade of machine oil.

6. Fig. 1 — Slip grass rod through eye in front of inner shoe and secure with bolt and washer.

7. Figs. 1 & 2 — Remove pin from eccentric bushing in inner shoe hinge; remove bolt from ball portion on inner shoe. Connect shoe to hinge by first slipping the ball on inside of shoe into socket in hinge, then put the pin in rear through shoe, eccentric bushing and hinge; attach gag lever brace to pin before securing with cotters. Replace bolt through ball and socket joint.

8. Figs. 1 & 5 — Attach gag lever links to bell crank as shown, having open side of hook down, and attach turn buckle to top of gag lever.

9. Figs. 1 & 2 — Bolt draft bracket to underside of pole, using the two forward holes of the three holes grouped together. Use clip for hold up rod under nut of forward bolt.

10. Figs. 1 & 2 — Attach draft rod to eye on push bar casting. Hook forward end of draft rod into lowest hole on draft equalizer. Then attach draft equalizer to draft bracket with pin and cotter.

New Idea Mower

11. Fig. 3 — Bolt seat spring to the socket provided for on the frame.

12. Fig. 3 — Attach hold up rod to top of pole as shown.

13. Fig. 2 — Attach swath board to outer shoe with spring and bolt found in shoe. Spring must be on outside of board as shown. Adjust the nut on bolt until it requires considerable pressure to cause the board to yield. Replace cotter in bolt.

14. Fig. 2 — Bolt grass stick to inside of swath board, placing steel socket over end of stick.

15. Fig. 1 — Pull raising lever to rear notch in quadrant. Hook spring on raising arm and secure rear end with tension bolt to lug on frame. Put sufficient tension on spring so cutter bar will lift easily with foot pedal. It takes approximately 90 pounds to lift the inner shoe off the ground when spring is properly adjusted.

16. Figs. 1 & 5 — The gag lever links should be adjusted so that the outer end of the cutter bar leaves the ground slightly before the inner end starts to raise. This adjustment is made on bolt “B” in Figures 1 & 5. To make the outer end raise faster the bolt should be screwed farther into the bell crank. The turn buckle on gag lever links can be adjusted (lengthening the links) if it is desired to have the outer end of the bar drop lower than the inner end. This adjustment ordinarily is not necessary.

17. Fig. 3 — Remove oil plug in gear case cover and fill with three quarts of light transmission oil SAE No. 90 grade. In cold weather add about one quart of SAE No. 30 oil.

WARNING: The mower is shipped without any oil in the gear case. Be sure that drain plug in gear case is tight.

OILING

Pressure fittings are provided on the wheels, the right end of the axle, the crank bearing, and the lift crank on the inner shoe. Lubricate these places once every day. Use nothing but a good grade of lubricant on these bearings. An occasional oiling of the joints of the lifting and tilting devices will materially ease their operation. Wherever the soil is sandy and full of grit the wearing plates and clips on the cutter bar should not be oiled. Where these conditions do not exist, oil the knife and guides frequently.

New Idea Mower

ALIGNMENT OF CUTTER BAR

For proper operation the outer end of the cutter bar should lead the inner end when the machine is not in operation. After long use the cutter bar may lag back and if this happens it can be corrected by making adjustments on the cutter bar eccentric bushing as follows: First making sure that the pin and bolt in the hinge casting “A” Fig. 5 are tight and in good condition. — Set the machine on a level floor and block up the front end of the tongue so that it is 32” above the floor then by referring to Fig. 4 remove retaining pin “B” and with a punch inserted at “C” drive bushing to left until cutter bar lines up as illustrated in Fig. 6.

New Idea Mower

REGISTER OF KNIFE

The cutter bar should be properly lined up before registering the knife. The square head eccentric pin “D” Fig. 5 locates the cutter bar in relation to the sickle. This pin is properly adjusted at the factory and normally should not require any adjustment. Should it become necessary to register the knife, turn pitman so that it is at extreme end of stroke; remove cotter pin at lower of square head pin “D”, pull pin out far enough to turn it. The location of cutter bar can now be changed by turning the pin onequarter or one-half turn to either right or left as required. Secure this adjusting pin with cotter after registering.

Keep the cutting parts in good condition at all times. Always have the knife sharp. See that the tip of each section lies smoothly on the ledger plate to insure a perfect shearing cut.

New Idea Mower

HOW TO REMOVE AND ATTACH PITMAN TO KNIFE HEAD

To remove the lower end of the pitman from the knife head insert the special wrench found in the tool box in the pitman cam as shown at “E” Fig. 5 and push toward the left causing pitman straps to open. The pitman can then be removed from the knife head.

TO ATTACH PITMAN TO KNIFE HEAD

Place the pitman straps on top of the knife head ball; be sure that the flat cam is in the open position. Force the spoons over the ball by pressing them down with your foot, then insert the special wrench in the cam “E” Fig. 5 and push toward the right until the pitman straps are closed and the cam locks into position with an audible click.

Always keep some oil on the ball portion and the cam.

New Idea Mower

If for some reason the upper end of the pitman needs to be disconnected from the crank bearing, remove only the aluminum dust cap; the blade on the upper end of the pitman can then be stripped off the crank bearing without removing the crank pin nut, see Figure 7.

Do not open-up the crank pin bearing unless it needs replacement. This is a special needle roller bearing and ordinarily needs no attention except greasing.

New Idea Mower

Use only a good pressure gun grease in this bearing. Under no circumstances use a grease that contains graphite. At the end of the season force in light oils so as to remove all of the old grease.

New Idea Mower

FORE TRUCK ATTACHMENT

While a fore truck is ordinarily not necessary on a NEW IDEA mower one can be furnished — as an extra — when desired. Fig. 9 illustrates this fore truck and method of attaching.

REPAIRS

Always order repairs by number and give the description of the part, and give the lot number that is stamped on the bottom of the tool box lid, where used and whether it is a right or left part. Right or left parts can be determined by standing back of the machine looking in the direction of travel then parts on the right side are RIGHT HAND and those on the left side are LEFT HAND parts.

A repair catalog No. M-25 was shipped with this machine and was made up for your convenience so proper parts can be ordered if needed. Always order repairs from the NEW IDEA dealer through whom you purchased this machine.

New Idea Mower

Spotlight On: People

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The Value of What You Grow

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Changing of Seasons

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We are blessed who are active participants in the life of soil and weather, crops and critters, living a life grounded in seasonal change. This talk of human connection to land and season is not just the rambling romantic musing of an agrarian ideologue. It is rather the result of participating in the deeply vital vocation that is farming and knowing its fruits first hand.

Hand-Harvested Food Challenge

The Hand-Harvested Food Challenge

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In the winter of 2011, Daniel mentioned a fourteen-year-old student of his who had spent a whole month eating only foods gathered from the wild. “Could we go for two days on the hand-harvested food we have here?’ he asked. “Let’s give it a try!” I responded with my usual enthusiasm. We assembled the ingredients on the table. Everything on that table had passed through our hands. We knew all the costs and calories associated with it. No hidden injustice, no questionable pesticides. We felt joy at living in such an edible world.

Field Weeds and Street Boys

Field Weeds and Street Boys

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So, our farming system to feed hungry street boys is to have them farm “weeds”. As we have all experienced, weeds are perfectly adapted to their climate, are robust and need no fertilizer nor any of the insecticides to enhance a good crop. Because we are aiming for long term diversified permaculture (this is a Shea native tree area), we needed some very quick marketable crops while we wait for the trees to mature. These field weeds intentionally farmed have a ready market in the big city 5 km north.

Harnessing the Future

Harnessing the Future

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En route to a remote pasture where the Belgian draft horses, Prince and Tom, are grazing, we survey the vast green landscape, a fine mist hovering in distant low lying areas. We are enveloped in a profusion of sweet, earthy balance. Interns and other workers start their chores; one pauses to check his smart phone. Scattered about are many animal-powered rustic implements. This rich and agriculturally diverse, peaceful place is steeped in contrasts: modern and ancient.

New York Horsefarmer Ed Button and his Belgians

New York Horsefarmer: Ed Button and his Belgians

In New York State one does not explore the world of draft horses long before the name of Ed Button is invariably and most respectfully mentioned. Ed’s name can be heard in the conversations of nearly everyone concerned with heavy horses from the most experienced teamsters to the most novice horse hobbyists. His career with Belgians includes a vast catalog of activities: showing, pulling, training, farming, breeding, and driving, which Ed says, “I’ve been doing since I was old enough to hold the lines.”

B. Adroit's Profiles in Passion: Herscel Gouda

B. Adroit’s Profiles in Passion: Herscel Gouda

Excerpt: Um, ya, you’re just gonna have to read this one.

Twain Under the Farm Spell

Twain Under the Farm Spell

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In his greatest works — Tom Sawyer, Life on the Mississippi and Huckleberry Finn — Twain offered a contrast and tension between town and countryside, between the web of deals and cons and bustle of activity that the modern world would call decidedly urban, and the hard-scrabble but quiet and ultimately nourishing living on farms. There were four farms that touched Sam Clemens, rural locales that sustained and helped mold him, that reached from his beginnings through the decades of his greatest creative efforts.

Fjordworks A History of Wrecks Part 2

Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 2

It is always fascinating and at times a little disconcerting to watch how seamlessly the macro-economics of trying to make a living as a farmer in such an out-of-balance society can morph us into shapes we never would have dreamed of when we were getting started. This year we will be putting in a refrigerated walk-in cooler which will allow us to put up more storage-share vegetables.

Richard Douglass, Self-sufficient Farmer

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from issue:

I’ve got two teams of Belgians that power all the things on the farm. I don’t have a tractor, I don’t have a truck or anything like that. Everything must be done by them. I have two buggy horses that I use for transportation. I have a one-seater buggy for when I’m going into work or into town by myself and then I have a two-seater one for when I’m with the kids.

NYFC Bootstrap Videos Clover Mead Farm

NYFC Bootstrap Videos: Clover Mead Farm

I couldn’t have been happier to collaborate with The National Young Farmers Coaltion again when they called up about being involved in their Bootstrap Blog Series. In 2013, all of their bloggers were young and beginning lady dairy farmers, and they invited us on board to consult and collaborate in the production of videos of each farmer contributor to the blog series.

Biodynamic Meeting at Ruby and Amber’s Organic Farm

Biodynamic Meeting at Ruby and Amber’s Organic Farm

by:
from issue:

One weekend I attended a Biodynamic meeting at Ruby and Amber’s Organic Farm in Dorena, Oregon, in the Row River Valley, just east of Cottage Grove. I always enjoy seeing other food growing operations, as this is such an infinitely broad subject, there is always much to learn from others’ experiences. At this farm, draft horses are used for much of the work.

Growing Farmers and the Food Movement for 50 Years

Growing Farmers and the Food Movement for 50 Years

by:
from issue:

It all began 50 years ago when faculty and students appealed to UC Santa Cruz Chancellor Dean McHenry, proposing a garden project that would serve as a central gathering spot on the remote, forested campus. As legend has it, Alan Chadwick, a charismatic, somewhat cantankerous master gardener from England, chose a steep, rocky, sun-scorched slope covered with poison oak to prove a point: If students could create a garden there, they could create one anywhere. And create they did.

Birth of a Farm

Birth of a Farm

by:
from issue:

“Isn’t it nice?” I offer to my supper companions, “to see our beautiful horses right while we’re eating? I feel like I’m on a Kentucky horse farm, with rolling bluegrass vistas.” I sweep my arm dramatically towards the view, the rigged up electric fence, the lawn straggling down to the pond, the three horses, one of whom is relieving herself at the moment. “Oh, huh,” he answers. “I was thinking it was more like a cheesy bed and breakfast.”

The Way To The Farm

Lise Hubbe stops mid-furrow at plowing demonstration for Evergreen State College students. She explains that the plow was going too deep…

In Memoriam Gene Logsdon

In Memoriam: Gene Logsdon

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from issue:

Gene didn’t see life (or much of anything else) through conventional eyes. I remember his comment about a course he took in psychology when he was trying to argue that animals did in fact have personalities (as any farmer or rancher will tell you is absolutely true), and the teacher basically told him to sit down and shut up because he didn’t know what he was taking about. Gene said: “I was so angry I left the course and then left the whole stupid school.”

A Small Good Thing

A Small Good Thing

We shared this video a while back, and now it has been released on Netflix. Check it out! — “A Small Good Thing” explores how the American Dream has reached its end and how for most of us, greater material wealth and upward mobility are no longer possible. To find out what is taking its place, this feature documentary follows six people in one community who have recast their lives so they can live with a sense of meaning.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT