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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

This excerpt is from Small Farmers Journal volume twenty-eight number three, and discusses building permanent corn cribs.

Permanent Corncribs

corn

Storing ear corn in a crib is the most practical way to hold corn on many farms. The crib should be placed away from other buildings or trees to allow free circulation of air through and around it. Placing the crib with the long walls exposed to the prevailing wind helps the circulation of air through the corn. The walls must be open to allow the air to circulate freely. Wood slats with openings between them, welded-wire mesh or coarse hardware cloth, or snow fence, if well supported, all make satisfactory crib walls. The floors can be either tight or open, but a wood floor must be far enough from the ground to prevent corn from drawing dampness and to prevent rats and other rodents from finding harbor under the crib. Concrete floors are satisfactory, and it is recommended that they be built with concrete foundations. A concrete floor needs a gravel fill at least six inches thick, and a moisture barrier of roll roofing or some similar material under the slab to prevent ground moisture from getting to the surface of the floor.

corn

The width of the crib is important. Corn in cribs that are more than 4 ½ feet wide may not keep unless it is artificially dried. With wide cribs and natural air-drying, some corn is sure to spoil.
Mechanical loading and unloading saves time and labor in getting the corn in and out of the crib. Doors high in the wall and spaced not more than eight feet apart make it possible to fill the crib with an elevator and to distribute the corn throughout the crib with little or no hand spreading, or to fill the crib by shoveling. With hatches in the roof, also not more than eight feet apart, an elevator can load the crib to capacity.

corn
The corn can be unloaded either through a trench made in the concrete floor in which a drag conveyor can be placed or by allowing the corn to feed from the unloading doors in the wall of the crib into an elevator. If the corn is fed in small quantities daily, a mechanized unloading arrangement may not be necessary.

corn
An extension to the upper end of the elevator or an inclined chute with a screen bottom made of two inch square welded wire onto which the elevator discharges, makes a good screen for separating shelled corn, broken pieces of cobs, and other trash from the ear corn. Trash accumulating in the crib reduces air circulation through the corn and increases the possibility of mold. Moving the elevator spout occasionally as the crib is filled prevents accumulation of shelled corn and other debris, which is a common cause of caked and spoiled corn.

If you are interested in more information on all agricultural pursuits, consider subscribing to the Small Farmers Journal, ONLINE or PAPERBACK. This piece is from back issue Volume 28 Number 3, and is available HERE.

Spotlight On: Book Reviews

Starting Your Farm

Starting Your Farm: Chapter 2

How do you learn the true status of that farm with the “for sale” sign? Here are some important pieces of information for you to learn about a given selling farm. The answers will most probably tell you how serious the seller is.

McCormick Deering/International No 7 vs no 9

McCormick Deering/International: No. 7 versus No. 9

McCormick Deering/International’s first enclosed gear model was the No. 7, an extremely successful and highly popular mower of excellent design.

Training Workhorses Training Teamsters First Time Hitching

First Time Hitching

More from Lynn R. Miller’s highly anticipated Second Edition of “Training Workhorses / Training Teamsters.” Today’s excerpt, “First Time Hitching,” is from Chapter 12, “Follow Through to Finish.”

Haltering Foals - Training Workhorses Training Teamsters

Haltering Foals

Lynn Miller’s highly regarded book, “Training Workhorses / Training Teamsters,” is back in print! And that’s not even the most exciting news: The Second Edition is in FULL COLOR! Today’s article, “Haltering Foals,” is an excerpt from Chapter 8, “Imprinting and Training New Born Foals.”

Laying Out Fields for Plowing

Laying Out Fields for Plowing

There are four general plans, or methods of plowing fields. These are: (1) to plow from one side of a field to the other; (2) to plow around the field; (3) to plow a field in lands; and (4) to start the plowing in the center of the field.

Chicken Guano: Top-Notch Fertilizer

Whoever thought I’d be singing the praises of chicken poop? I am, and I’m not the only one. Chickens are walking nitrogen-rich manure bins.

An Introduction To Grasslands Farming

From Dusty Shelves: A World War II era article on grassland farming.

Aboard the Planetary Spaceship

Aboard the Planetary Spaceship

SFJ Spring 2016 Preview: Edward O. Wilson’s new book, Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life, offers a plan for the problem of species extinction: the dominant species, man, must hold itself back, must relinquish half the earth’s surface to those endangered. It is a challenging and on the face of it improbable thought, expressed in a terse style. But his phrases are packed because the hour is late.

Haying With Horses

Hitching Horses To A Mower

When hitching to the mower, first make sure it’s on level ground and out of gear. The cutter bar should be fastened up in the vertical or carrier position. This is for safety of all people in attendance during hitching.

Honoring Our Teachers

Honoring Our Teachers

by:
from issue:

I believe that there exist many great practicing teachers, some of who deliberately set out to become one and others who may have never graduated from college but are none-the-less excellent and capable teachers. I would hazard a guess that many readers of Small Farmer’s Journal know more than one teacher who falls within this latter category. My grandfather, and artist and author Eric Sloane, were two such teachers.

Starting Your Farm

Starting Your Farm: Chapter 3

What goes with the sale? What does not? Do not assume the irrigation pipe and portable hen houses are selling. Find out if they go with the deal, and in writing.

One Seed To Another: The New Small Farming

One Seed to Another

One Seed to Another is staggering and bracing in its truths and relevance. This is straight talk from a man whose every breath is poetry and whose heartbeat is directly plugged into farming as right livelihood.

Basic Blacksmithing Techniques

Illustrated guide to basic blacksmithing techniques, an excerpt from Blacksmithing: Basics For The Homestead.

Swallow

Rotation As A Means Of Blight Control

Every farmer knows that when a crop is grown on the same field year after year, it becomes inferior in quality and the yield steadily diminishes.

How To Dry Up A Doe Goat

How To Dry Up A Doe Goat

You are probably thinking why would I want to dry up a doe? If the plan is to rebreed the doe, then she will need time to rebuild her stamina. Milk production takes energy. Kid production takes energy, too. If the plan is to have a fresh goat in March, then toward the end of October start to dry her up. The first thing to do is cut back on her grain. Grain fuels milk production.

Plowing with the Single Horse

Plowing with the Single Horse

All other aspects being equal, the primary difference in plowing, comfortably, with a single horse is that the animal walks on unplowed ground immediately adjacent to the previous furrow, rather than in the furrow. This will cause the point of draft at the shoulder to be somewhat higher and will dictate hitching longer and/or higher than with the animal walking down 5 to 8 inches lower in the furrow.

How To Prune

From Dusty Shelves: Pruning Guide from 1917

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT