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Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

Planet Jr. Two-Horse Equipment

This information on Planet Jr. two horse equipment is from an old booklet which had been shared with us by Dave McCoy, a horse-logger from our parts. A special thank you to Dave from all of us. This sharing business makes this publication real. LRM

Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

The No. 72 has five levers, and they simplify its control so that a boy can operate it with success. The center lever adjusts the hinged tongue regulating the depth of the front teeth and leveling up the machine to suit all heights of neck yoke. The outside levers regulate the depth of the teeth in the rear, while the intermediate levers are used in changing the widths of the gangs to suit irregular planting, without stopping the team. The levers open or close BOTH SIDES OF THE FRAME EQUALLY, so that the teeth always work the spaces thoroughly.

The Equipment. Seven 2-1/4-inch x 8-inch reversible high carbon beveled steel teeth are carried by each frame. The four large plows are used in place of the front cultivator teeth to plow to or from the row; they are reversible.

Two wide shovels are useful for marking out two rows at once from 28 to 48 inches apart, or to use for hilling.

The Standards are hollow steel, the five rear ones being attached directly to the frame, because they do not need any adjustment except what is provided for by the levers; but the front standards are all adjustable for depth and angle, throwing to or from the rows as desired. All have break pins unless otherwise ordered.

The Four Adjustable All Steel Standards take the plows; these are used to plow to and from the row, and they enable the operator to cover at one passage two rows of manure or potatoes or corn, beans, etc., that have been dropped into furrows, up to 44 inches apart.

The Pivot Wheels work quickly and make the cultivation of crooked rows easy. They can be made stationary when desired. They adjust for all width rows, 28 to 44 inches inclusive.

The Arch and Seat are unusually high, 34 inches in the clear; the seat is adjustable back and forth and in height.

Plant Shields. Each tool is furnished with four plant shields. They make close cultivation possible when the plan.ts are small.

Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

No. 72 cultivating two rows of corn in one passage.

Think of the saving made in cultivating perfectly two rows of potatoes, beans, corn or any crop planted in rows not over 44 inches apart, at a single passage. This means double work at a single cost, for the arrangement of the fourteen teeth is such that all the ground is well tilled and no open furrows are left next to the row, while one man attends easily to the work, with one team. The No. 72 is especially intended for working crops often and at a moderate depth. For extra deep work or for heavy soil we sell a four-horse hitch.

For hilling and plowing the last time, the plows followed by cultivator teeth give fine results. For shallow surface work two pairs 10-inch Hoe Steels (with No. 2363-4 standards) and ten sweeps make a fine mulch.

Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

No. 72G – Equipped with Automatic Spring Trip Standards. Where soil is stony, rough, stumpy, or rooty, it is difficult to use a cultivator equipped with solid standards without too many stops to replace break pins. So the demand is insistent for the best device to overcome this annoyance. Planet Jr. Spring Trips have been improved by increasing the strength of the compression spring, and can be recommended to be just what is needed. Spring Trips save a great deal of time and will come into wider use as their value becomes better known. Illustrations show their construction. New Spring Lift easily raises the extra heavy gangs.

Extra Attachments

Discs, Sweeps, Hoe Steels, Furrowers, fit the No. 72. All are specially hardened; correctly designed.

Spring Trips for Nos. 72 and 76 cultivators sold as extras or in place of pin break standards. See No. 72G, No. 76G.

Spring Tooth Weeder No 5361X can be attached between the gangs (with extra parts) and makes a very satisfactory weeder for early cultivation.

Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

Discs, supplied as extras may be used as plant guards and take place of front teeth for disc cultivation. Two sizes, 12 and 14 inch.

Four-horse Hitch: Satisfactorily used until corn is 2 feet high. Furnished with heavy 88-inch evener, two 44-inch double-trees and two extra single-trees only; or with evener only, with connections.

Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

Planet Jr. No. 76 Pivot Wheel Riding Cultivator combines in itself nearly all the practical advantages possible in a riding cultivator and is a time and labor-saver for every farmer who cultivates ten to a hundred or more acres.

The No. 76 works rows 28 to 48 inches apart, cultivating, plowing or hilling. Marks out rows 28 to 48 inches apart, two at once, and with the plows will cover or make up drills ready for seed sowing or planting.

The No. 76 is Simple – Roomy – Strong – Easily Handled. Every part is made of the best material, by thoroughly experienced workmen.

MASTER LEVER: An improvement that saves time and labor. Both gangs are easily raised and lowered with one hand, leaving one hand entirely free. So balanced that the springs raise the gangs when lever is released. Easy handle grip and quick-acting latch are features of this Master Lever that you will like. Gangs can be set independently with the left hand lever where a difference in depth is needed.

The Gang Frames are extra heavy, but improved levers with lifting and depth-regulating springs make for easy, perfect control.

Each standard has two holes in lower end so when cultivator steels wear down they may be let down for further use.

The Draft Control insures satisfactory work in all soil conditions.

Adjustable Stops regulate so that after turning at ends of rows, the cultivator goes to work at the exact depth as before, automatically.

Malleable Pivots and Steel Axles: Both practically dust-proof.

Steel Ratchets and Pins.

Spring Seat: Comfortable and large; adjustable up, down, back and forward.

The Discs can be set to throw to or from the row. When used to throw away, they act as plant shields.

Central Lever: Operates the hinged tongue, regulating depth of front teeth and leveling the cultivator. The same lever moves teeth instantly, closer to or further from the row, while team is in motion.

All Parts Steel except a few where Malleable Iron is better.

All Teeth Specially Hardened.

Extra Attachments

Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

The Spring Tooth Weeder, illustrated, is a valuable, inexpensive extra attachment for the No. 76. Attached in center of the cultivator, it is very useful for first cultivation of corn, potatoes, etc. Eliminates need for separate weeder, separate operation, cultivating, weeding, pulverizing in row being done at one time. Can also be attached to the No. 72, with extra parts.

Tobacco Hoeing Attachment: Can be supplied for working tobacco, cabbage, potatoes, peppers and other plants set two to four feet apart in row, hoeing sides of row and between plants with work in clear view. Includes extra seat so that boy may drive while operator does the hoeing. Save 75% of hoeing in vegetables, says one big grower.

The No. 76D is the same as the No. 76 except equipment which includes only the eight cultivator steels and pair of plant shields. Other attachments supplied with complete No. 76 may be added.

Planet Jr Two Horse Equipment

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