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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Plans for Hog Houses

by J.C. Wooley and R.L. Rickets
Ag. Exten. Circular 471 July 1942

Missouri Sunlit Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

This is an east and west type of house lighted by windows in the south roof. Covers are made to place over windows at night to prevent excessive heat loss. A single stack ventilation system with distributed inlets provides ventilation. Floor may be of concrete or hollow tile. Pen partitions may be of wood or metal. This plan takes the place of the original Missouri sunlit house since many farmers had difficulty in building it.

Modified A Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

This may be built in either a single or a double unit.

Combination Roof Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

May be built single or double.

Nebraska Straw Loft Farrowing House

Plans for Hog Houses

This is a north and south type of house. Wall windows on the east, south and west furnish light. The straw loft furnishes insulation, provides a place for storing bedding and the straw so stored aids in controlling humidity. Pens are removable so that the house can be used as a feeding floor. A single stack ventilation system is satisfactory for this house.

Self Feeder for Hogs

Plans for Hog Houses

Hog Feeder

Plans for Hog Houses

Hog Trough

Plans for Hog Houses

A well made hog trough will save much valuable feed during the course of a season. The trough should be built from seasoned material and then given a good coating of creosote or tar before it is used. Ends may be left long to prevent trough being overturned.

Material List for Trough 12 feet long

1 2×8 16 Ends and narrow side 22 bd. ft.
1 2×10 12 Wide side 20 bd. ft.
1 2×2 16 Cross ties 5 1/2 bd. ft.
1 1?2 lbs. 16d spikes

Shipping Crate

Plans for Hog Houses
Plans for Hog Houses

It is often necessary for show or breeding purposes to ship individual hogs. If such shipments are made by freight or express a crate is essential. If a single hog is to be transported by truck the crate will be a great convenience and will enable the owner to transport an animal with minimum loss due to injury.

The ends of the crate are made to slide up so that the animal may be crated or driven from the crate without difficulty. For extra heavy hogs the corners should be bound with strap iron to give additional strength. Express companies require that the sides of the crate be tight at the bottom so that the animal cannot get his feet through when lying down and thus be injured.

Size of Crate to Build

Weight of Hog Length of Crate Width of Crate Height of Crate
25 to 75 35 12 23
75 to 100 46 18 28
150 to 250 54 20 34
250 to 350 60 20 38
350 to 500 64 24 40
500 to 800 80 30 48
800 to 1000 84 30 50

Material List for Shipping Crate (for Crate 60 inches long)

2 1×6 T&G 10′ long Doors 20 bd. ft.
4 1×6 10′ long Floors and Siding
3 1×4 10′ long Cross ties, top and bottom 10 bd. ft.
1 1×4 12′ long 4 bd. ft.
2 1×4 12′ long 16 bd. ft.
1 lb. 8d nails

Vaccinating Trough

Plans for Hog Houses

A convenient means for holding hogs for vaccination is almost essential on the hog farm today. The plan shown can be made very easily and cheaply and will save much labor and may save injury to the animals.

Material List for Vaccinating Trough

1 2×12 8′ 16 bd. ft.
1 2×4 12′ 8 bd. ft.
1 1×4 4′ 2 bd. ft.
1/2 lb. 16d nails

Rubbing Post

Plans for Hog Houses

A cheap and fairly efficient type of hog oiler can be made as shown. Grooves cut in the post will facilitate feeding the oil into the burlap. Frequent applications of oil will be necessary to make this effective.

Loading Chute

Plans for Hog Houses

Where hogs are frequently hauled by wagon or truck, a portable loading chute is a great convenience. By use of a suitable arrangement of pens and gates, hogs may be loaded with a minimum effort and with a small amount of loss from worrying the animals.

Such a structure must be well braced if it is to give long service.

Material List for Loading Chute

2 2×4 16 Studs, braces, etc. 22 bd. ft.
1 2×4 14 Studs and braces 10 bd. ft.
2 2×8 16 Floor 44 bd. ft.
1 1×4 12 Braces 3 bd. ft
5 1×6 16 Sides 80 bd. ft.
1 lb. 16d spikes
1 lb. 8d common nails

Ringing Chute

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

The type of ringing chute shown has been found to be very satisfactory in regard to its mechanical construction and has also been found to be a great labor saver on the farm. Some men who have not seen this chute used have felt that there would be difficulty in catching the animals to be run. If the stanchion is set with an opening just large enough for the hog to get his head through, he will try to escape and can be easily caught. No difficulty in catching the hogs has been encountered in using this chute.

Material List for Ringing Chute

2 2×4 16 Studs and stanchions 22 bd. ft.
2 2×4 10 Cross ties 14 bd. ft.
1 1×6 14 Floor 7 bd. ft.
4 1×4 14 Sides 20 bd. ft.
14 3/8″x5″ Carriage bolts
1 1/4″x4″ Carriage bolt
1 lb. 8d common nails

Frost Proof Drinking Fountain

sfj_plans_for_hog_houses_14

The fountain shown in the cut can be placed so that the float chamber will not freeze. If the drinking trough is placed to face the south, little trouble will be encountered with freezing in this. A fountain like this built into the hog shed is very satisfactory.

Material List for Frost Proof Drinking Fountain

  • 1/2 Yd. gravel
  • 5 sacks cement
  • 1/2 sack hydrated lime
  • Float and check valve
  • Pipe
  • Reinforcement

Movable Waterer

Plans for Hog Houses

It is often desirable to confine hogs in a field where there is no water. In hogging down corn or other crops, there is often no water available in the field. This movable waterer will meet the needs of such cases.

Material List for Movable Waterer

1 4×4 10′ long 14 bd. ft.
1 2×12 12′ long 24 bd. ft.
1 oil barrel
1 patent waterer

Concrete Hog Wallow

Plans for Hog Houses

A hog wallow properly built and cared for is a necessity on a farm where fat hogs are being carried over through the hot weather of summer. The hog will stay in the water long enough to get cooled off and will seek a place in the shade. The evaporation of the water will keep him cool for quite a little time. No hogs have been lost from heat at the University Farm when hog wallows were available. Quite a number were lost annually before the installation of this equipment.

In hot weather plenty of water should be kept in the wallow. If this is done, hogs will not lay in it for any length of time and a wallow of the size shown will serve a larger number of hogs. A small amount of oil in the water, will keep the hogs from drinking it and will be of value in keeping them free from vermin.

If the wallow can be located in the shade of a tree, the roof can be omit- ted, but if shade is not available, the roof should be built as shown. Wherever possible surface drainage should be provided as shown. Underground drains will soon clog up and fail to work.

Material List for Concrete Hog Wallow

2 lbs.

11 sacks cement (mix 1 to 4)
2 yards gravel
10 steel posts
2 2×6 10′ roof supports 20 bd. ft.
2 2×6 16′ roof supports 32 bd. ft.
Boxing 16′ lengths
10 3/8″x8″ U-bolts
1/2 lb. 16d spikes
8d common nails
1/4 gal. paint

Herding Gate

Plans for Hog Houses

For separating hogs or driving them into wagons or pens, a herding gate carried in front of the driver furnishes a much more effective barrier than a pair of moving arms. The gate must be made as light and strong as possible. Cypress is an excellent wood for this kind of construction.

Material List for Herding Gate

3 1×4 12′ Cypress or soft pine 12 bd. ft.
1/8 lb. 6d nails

Salt Feeders

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

Spotlight On: People

Harnessing the Future

Harnessing the Future

by:
from issue:

En route to a remote pasture where the Belgian draft horses, Prince and Tom, are grazing, we survey the vast green landscape, a fine mist hovering in distant low lying areas. We are enveloped in a profusion of sweet, earthy balance. Interns and other workers start their chores; one pauses to check his smart phone. Scattered about are many animal-powered rustic implements. This rich and agriculturally diverse, peaceful place is steeped in contrasts: modern and ancient.

Another Barn Falls In

Another Barn Falls In

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from issue:

The barn was built around a century ago. A pair of double doors on the front flapped when the wind blew, and a short service door was on the side. It wasn’t a big barn, about 30 feet wide by 40 feet long with a small hay mow above. It had a couple of windows for light, and of course a window in the peak. There was a hitching rail outside that gave it a certain welcoming charm. A charm that seemed to say, “tie up to the rail, and c’mon in.”

Feeding Elk Winter Work for the Belgians

Feeding Elk: Winter Work for the Belgians

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Doug Strike of rural Sublette County is spending his second winter feeding wild elk in nearby Bondurant, Wyoming. Strike is supplementing his logging income as well as helping his team of Belgian draft horses to keep in shape for the coming season. From May to the end of November he uses his horses to skid logs out of the mountains of western Wyoming. I found the use of Doug’s beautiful Belgian team an exciting example of appropriate technology.

Rainshadow Organics Saralee and the Interns

Rainshadow Organics: Saralee & the Interns

Rainshadow Organics in Central Oregon is a really big small farm. As part of their mission to produce and promote good food, they participate in the Rogue Farm Corps internship program. This season they have 7 interns who made time during their lunch break to speak to us about the program.

Fjordworks A History of Wrecks Part 3

Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 3

Working with horses can and should be safe and fun and profitable. The road to getting there need not be so fraught with danger and catastrophe as ours has been. I hope the telling of our story, in both its disasters and successes will not dissuade but rather inspire would-be teamsters to join the horse-powered ranks and avoid the pitfalls of the un-mentored greenhorn.

Icelandic Sheep

Icelandic Sheep

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from issue:

I came to sheep farming from a background in the arts – with a passion for spinning and weaving. When we were able to leave our house in town to buy our small farm, a former dairy operation, I had no idea that the desire to have a couple of fiber animals would turn into full time shepherding. I had discovered Icelandic sheep, and was completely enamored of their beauty, their hardiness and their intelligence.

Cindys Curds & Whey

Cindy’s Curds & Whey

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from issue:

The Burgess dairy farm and cheese factory are sustainable operations, meaning that nearly every by-product is re-used or recycled. For example, the usually-discarded whey goes to feed their own pigs, producing an exceptionally tasty, lean pork. Whey is the liquid portion of milk that develops after the milk protein has coagulated, and contains water, milk sugar, albuminous proteins, and minerals.

Great Oregon Steam Up

Great Oregon Steam-Up Bonus Gallery

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from issue:

The best thing about the SFJ website is “unlimited real estate.” With each issue of the Small Farmer’s Journal comes the required agonizing over what to keep and what to sacrifice due to page space. What follows is a photo gallery of every picture we took at the 2016 Great Oregon Steam-Up. Why? Because we can! And, because there were a lot of interesting machines there that we are sure some of you will enjoy seeing.

Building a Community, Building a Barn

Building a Community, Building a Barn

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from issue:

One of the most striking aspects of this development is the strength and confidence that comes from this communal way of living. While it is impressive to build a barn in a day it seems even more impressive to imagine building four barns or six, and all the rest of the needs of a community. For these young Amish families the vision of a shared agricultural community is strong, and clear.

The Way To The Farm

Lise Hubbe stops mid-furrow at plowing demonstration for Evergreen State College students. She explains that the plow was going too deep…

UCSC Farm & Garden Apprenticeship

UC Santa Cruz Farm & Garden Apprenticeship

UC Santa Cruz is thrilled to welcome applications to the 50th Anniversary year of the UCSC Farm and Garden Apprenticeship in Ecological Horticulture. The 39 apprentices each year arrive from all regions of the US and abroad, and represent a wide spectrum of ages, backgrounds, and interests. We have a range of course fee waivers available to support participation in the Apprenticeship.

Sack Sewing with Wayne Ryan

Sack Sewing with Wayne Ryan

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Watching Wayne’s sure hands it was easy for me to forget that this is a 91 year old man. There was strength, economy, elegance and thrift in his every stroke.

Great Oregon Steam Up

Great Oregon Steam-Up

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from issue:

I went to the Great Oregon Steam-Up over in Brooks, Oregon, near Salem. Lynn has been invited and has wanted to attend for years, but this time of year might very well be the busiest time of year for him. He’s always farming or writing or editing or painting or forecasting or businessing or just generally fightin’ the power, yo. It’s nuts, I don’t know how he does it all. So, when I told him I was going to go, he was very interested and wanted a good report.

Portrait of a Garden

Portrait of a Garden

As the seasons slip by at a centuries-old Dutch estate, an 85-year-old pruning master and the owner work on cultivating crops in the kitchen garden. To do this successfully requires a degree of obsessiveness, the old man explains in this calm, observational documentary. The pruning master still works every day. It would be easier if he were only 60 and young.

The Farmer and the Horse

The Farmer & The Horse

In New Jersey — land of The Sopranos, Jersey Shore, and the Turnpike — farmland is more expensive than anywhere else. It’s not an easy place to try to start a career as a farmer. But for a new generation of farmers inspired by sustainability, everything seems possible. Even a farm powered by draft horses.

No Starving Children!

You’d never be able to harvest the broccoli or the hay or milk the cows or make the cheese if it were subject to government process. Not only are our industrial farms too big…

In Memoriam Gene Logsdon

In Memoriam: Gene Logsdon

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Gene didn’t see life (or much of anything else) through conventional eyes. I remember his comment about a course he took in psychology when he was trying to argue that animals did in fact have personalities (as any farmer or rancher will tell you is absolutely true), and the teacher basically told him to sit down and shut up because he didn’t know what he was taking about. Gene said: “I was so angry I left the course and then left the whole stupid school.”

Birth of a Farm

Birth of a Farm

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“Isn’t it nice?” I offer to my supper companions, “to see our beautiful horses right while we’re eating? I feel like I’m on a Kentucky horse farm, with rolling bluegrass vistas.” I sweep my arm dramatically towards the view, the rigged up electric fence, the lawn straggling down to the pond, the three horses, one of whom is relieving herself at the moment. “Oh, huh,” he answers. “I was thinking it was more like a cheesy bed and breakfast.”

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT