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Plans for Hog Houses

by J.C. Wooley and R.L. Rickets
Ag. Exten. Circular 471 July 1942

Missouri Sunlit Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

This is an east and west type of house lighted by windows in the south roof. Covers are made to place over windows at night to prevent excessive heat loss. A single stack ventilation system with distributed inlets provides ventilation. Floor may be of concrete or hollow tile. Pen partitions may be of wood or metal. This plan takes the place of the original Missouri sunlit house since many farmers had difficulty in building it.

Modified A Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

This may be built in either a single or a double unit.

Combination Roof Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

May be built single or double.

Nebraska Straw Loft Farrowing House

Plans for Hog Houses

This is a north and south type of house. Wall windows on the east, south and west furnish light. The straw loft furnishes insulation, provides a place for storing bedding and the straw so stored aids in controlling humidity. Pens are removable so that the house can be used as a feeding floor. A single stack ventilation system is satisfactory for this house.

Self Feeder for Hogs

Plans for Hog Houses

Hog Feeder

Plans for Hog Houses

Hog Trough

Plans for Hog Houses

A well made hog trough will save much valuable feed during the course of a season. The trough should be built from seasoned material and then given a good coating of creosote or tar before it is used. Ends may be left long to prevent trough being overturned.

Material List for Trough 12 feet long

1 2×8 16 Ends and narrow side 22 bd. ft.
1 2×10 12 Wide side 20 bd. ft.
1 2×2 16 Cross ties 5 1/2 bd. ft.
1 1?2 lbs. 16d spikes

Shipping Crate

Plans for Hog Houses
Plans for Hog Houses

It is often necessary for show or breeding purposes to ship individual hogs. If such shipments are made by freight or express a crate is essential. If a single hog is to be transported by truck the crate will be a great convenience and will enable the owner to transport an animal with minimum loss due to injury.

The ends of the crate are made to slide up so that the animal may be crated or driven from the crate without difficulty. For extra heavy hogs the corners should be bound with strap iron to give additional strength. Express companies require that the sides of the crate be tight at the bottom so that the animal cannot get his feet through when lying down and thus be injured.

Size of Crate to Build

Weight of Hog Length of Crate Width of Crate Height of Crate
25 to 75 35 12 23
75 to 100 46 18 28
150 to 250 54 20 34
250 to 350 60 20 38
350 to 500 64 24 40
500 to 800 80 30 48
800 to 1000 84 30 50

Material List for Shipping Crate (for Crate 60 inches long)

2 1×6 T&G 10′ long Doors 20 bd. ft.
4 1×6 10′ long Floors and Siding
3 1×4 10′ long Cross ties, top and bottom 10 bd. ft.
1 1×4 12′ long 4 bd. ft.
2 1×4 12′ long 16 bd. ft.
1 lb. 8d nails

Vaccinating Trough

Plans for Hog Houses

A convenient means for holding hogs for vaccination is almost essential on the hog farm today. The plan shown can be made very easily and cheaply and will save much labor and may save injury to the animals.

Material List for Vaccinating Trough

1 2×12 8′ 16 bd. ft.
1 2×4 12′ 8 bd. ft.
1 1×4 4′ 2 bd. ft.
1/2 lb. 16d nails

Rubbing Post

Plans for Hog Houses

A cheap and fairly efficient type of hog oiler can be made as shown. Grooves cut in the post will facilitate feeding the oil into the burlap. Frequent applications of oil will be necessary to make this effective.

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