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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PST

Plans for Hog Houses

by J.C. Wooley and R.L. Rickets
Ag. Exten. Circular 471 July 1942

Missouri Sunlit Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

This is an east and west type of house lighted by windows in the south roof. Covers are made to place over windows at night to prevent excessive heat loss. A single stack ventilation system with distributed inlets provides ventilation. Floor may be of concrete or hollow tile. Pen partitions may be of wood or metal. This plan takes the place of the original Missouri sunlit house since many farmers had difficulty in building it.

Modified A Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

This may be built in either a single or a double unit.

Combination Roof Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

May be built single or double.

Nebraska Straw Loft Farrowing House

Plans for Hog Houses

This is a north and south type of house. Wall windows on the east, south and west furnish light. The straw loft furnishes insulation, provides a place for storing bedding and the straw so stored aids in controlling humidity. Pens are removable so that the house can be used as a feeding floor. A single stack ventilation system is satisfactory for this house.

Self Feeder for Hogs

Plans for Hog Houses

Hog Feeder

Plans for Hog Houses

Hog Trough

Plans for Hog Houses

A well made hog trough will save much valuable feed during the course of a season. The trough should be built from seasoned material and then given a good coating of creosote or tar before it is used. Ends may be left long to prevent trough being overturned.

Material List for Trough 12 feet long

1 2×8 16 Ends and narrow side 22 bd. ft.
1 2×10 12 Wide side 20 bd. ft.
1 2×2 16 Cross ties 5 1/2 bd. ft.
1 1?2 lbs. 16d spikes

Shipping Crate

Plans for Hog Houses
Plans for Hog Houses

It is often necessary for show or breeding purposes to ship individual hogs. If such shipments are made by freight or express a crate is essential. If a single hog is to be transported by truck the crate will be a great convenience and will enable the owner to transport an animal with minimum loss due to injury.

The ends of the crate are made to slide up so that the animal may be crated or driven from the crate without difficulty. For extra heavy hogs the corners should be bound with strap iron to give additional strength. Express companies require that the sides of the crate be tight at the bottom so that the animal cannot get his feet through when lying down and thus be injured.

Size of Crate to Build

Weight of Hog Length of Crate Width of Crate Height of Crate
25 to 75 35 12 23
75 to 100 46 18 28
150 to 250 54 20 34
250 to 350 60 20 38
350 to 500 64 24 40
500 to 800 80 30 48
800 to 1000 84 30 50

Material List for Shipping Crate (for Crate 60 inches long)

2 1×6 T&G 10′ long Doors 20 bd. ft.
4 1×6 10′ long Floors and Siding
3 1×4 10′ long Cross ties, top and bottom 10 bd. ft.
1 1×4 12′ long 4 bd. ft.
2 1×4 12′ long 16 bd. ft.
1 lb. 8d nails

Vaccinating Trough

Plans for Hog Houses

A convenient means for holding hogs for vaccination is almost essential on the hog farm today. The plan shown can be made very easily and cheaply and will save much labor and may save injury to the animals.

Material List for Vaccinating Trough

1 2×12 8′ 16 bd. ft.
1 2×4 12′ 8 bd. ft.
1 1×4 4′ 2 bd. ft.
1/2 lb. 16d nails

Rubbing Post

Plans for Hog Houses

A cheap and fairly efficient type of hog oiler can be made as shown. Grooves cut in the post will facilitate feeding the oil into the burlap. Frequent applications of oil will be necessary to make this effective.

Loading Chute

Plans for Hog Houses

Where hogs are frequently hauled by wagon or truck, a portable loading chute is a great convenience. By use of a suitable arrangement of pens and gates, hogs may be loaded with a minimum effort and with a small amount of loss from worrying the animals.

Such a structure must be well braced if it is to give long service.

Material List for Loading Chute

2 2×4 16 Studs, braces, etc. 22 bd. ft.
1 2×4 14 Studs and braces 10 bd. ft.
2 2×8 16 Floor 44 bd. ft.
1 1×4 12 Braces 3 bd. ft
5 1×6 16 Sides 80 bd. ft.
1 lb. 16d spikes
1 lb. 8d common nails

Ringing Chute

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

The type of ringing chute shown has been found to be very satisfactory in regard to its mechanical construction and has also been found to be a great labor saver on the farm. Some men who have not seen this chute used have felt that there would be difficulty in catching the animals to be run. If the stanchion is set with an opening just large enough for the hog to get his head through, he will try to escape and can be easily caught. No difficulty in catching the hogs has been encountered in using this chute.

Material List for Ringing Chute

2 2×4 16 Studs and stanchions 22 bd. ft.
2 2×4 10 Cross ties 14 bd. ft.
1 1×6 14 Floor 7 bd. ft.
4 1×4 14 Sides 20 bd. ft.
14 3/8″x5″ Carriage bolts
1 1/4″x4″ Carriage bolt
1 lb. 8d common nails

Frost Proof Drinking Fountain

sfj_plans_for_hog_houses_14

The fountain shown in the cut can be placed so that the float chamber will not freeze. If the drinking trough is placed to face the south, little trouble will be encountered with freezing in this. A fountain like this built into the hog shed is very satisfactory.

Material List for Frost Proof Drinking Fountain

  • 1/2 Yd. gravel
  • 5 sacks cement
  • 1/2 sack hydrated lime
  • Float and check valve
  • Pipe
  • Reinforcement

Movable Waterer

Plans for Hog Houses

It is often desirable to confine hogs in a field where there is no water. In hogging down corn or other crops, there is often no water available in the field. This movable waterer will meet the needs of such cases.

Material List for Movable Waterer

1 4×4 10′ long 14 bd. ft.
1 2×12 12′ long 24 bd. ft.
1 oil barrel
1 patent waterer

Concrete Hog Wallow

Plans for Hog Houses

A hog wallow properly built and cared for is a necessity on a farm where fat hogs are being carried over through the hot weather of summer. The hog will stay in the water long enough to get cooled off and will seek a place in the shade. The evaporation of the water will keep him cool for quite a little time. No hogs have been lost from heat at the University Farm when hog wallows were available. Quite a number were lost annually before the installation of this equipment.

In hot weather plenty of water should be kept in the wallow. If this is done, hogs will not lay in it for any length of time and a wallow of the size shown will serve a larger number of hogs. A small amount of oil in the water, will keep the hogs from drinking it and will be of value in keeping them free from vermin.

If the wallow can be located in the shade of a tree, the roof can be omit- ted, but if shade is not available, the roof should be built as shown. Wherever possible surface drainage should be provided as shown. Underground drains will soon clog up and fail to work.

Material List for Concrete Hog Wallow

2 lbs.

11 sacks cement (mix 1 to 4)
2 yards gravel
10 steel posts
2 2×6 10′ roof supports 20 bd. ft.
2 2×6 16′ roof supports 32 bd. ft.
Boxing 16′ lengths
10 3/8″x8″ U-bolts
1/2 lb. 16d spikes
8d common nails
1/4 gal. paint

Herding Gate

Plans for Hog Houses

For separating hogs or driving them into wagons or pens, a herding gate carried in front of the driver furnishes a much more effective barrier than a pair of moving arms. The gate must be made as light and strong as possible. Cypress is an excellent wood for this kind of construction.

Material List for Herding Gate

3 1×4 12′ Cypress or soft pine 12 bd. ft.
1/8 lb. 6d nails

Salt Feeders

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

Spotlight On: How-To & Plans

Harvesting Rainwater

Harvesting Rainwater

by:
from issue:

Collecting rainwater for use during dry months is an ancient practice that has never lost its value. Today, simple water collection systems made from recycled food barrels can mean a free source of non-potable water for plants, gardens, bird baths, and many other uses. Rainwater is ideal for all plants because it doesn’t contain dissolved minerals or added chemicals. One inch of rain falling on a 1,000 square foot roof yields approximately 600 gallons of water.

Pulling A Load With Oxen

an excerpt from Oxen: A Teamster’s Guide

Homemade Cheese Press

Homemade Cheese Press

by:
from issue:

On the Gies farmstead we occasionally wallow in goat milk. From it we make our own butter, yogurt and cheese as well as drink some. This has prompted me to build a little cheese press to help with the extra milk. The press is made from inexpensive 1/2 inch thick plastic cutting boards used for the top and bottom plates and pressure disks, white pvc pipe, and a plastic floor drain cap.

The Anatomy of Thrift: Harvest Day

On the Anatomy of Thrift Part 2: Harvest Day

On the Anatomy of Thrift is an instructional series Farmrun created with Farmstead Meatsmith. Their principal intention is instruction in the matters of traditional pork processing. In a broader and more honest context, OAT is a deeply philosophical manifesto on the subject of eating animals. Harvest Day is the second in the series, which explores the ‘cheer’ that is prepared on the day of slaughter, and dives deep into the philosophy and psychology of our relationship to animals.

Basil Scarberrys Ground-Drive Forecart

Basil Scarberry’s Ground-Drive Forecart

by:
from issue:

I used an ’84 Chevrolet S-10 rear end to build my forecart, turn it over to get right rotation, used master cylinder off buggy and 2” Reese hitch, extend hitch out to use P.T.O. The cart is especially useful for tedding hay. However, its uses are virtually unlimited. We use it for hauling firewood on a trailer, for pulling a disc and peg tooth harrow, for hauling baled hay on an 8’ x 16’ hay wagon, and just for a jaunt about the farm and community.

Sack Sewing with Wayne Ryan

Sack Sewing with Wayne Ryan

by:
from issue:

Watching Wayne’s sure hands it was easy for me to forget that this is a 91 year old man. There was strength, economy, elegance and thrift in his every stroke.

Blacksmithing

Blacksmithing

from issue:

Modern farm machinery is largely of iron and steel construction, making an equipment of metal working tools necessary if satisfactory repairs are to be made. Forging operations consist of bending, upsetting, drawing out, welding, punching, drilling, riveting, thread-cutting, hardening, tempering, and annealing. Heat makes iron soft and ductile. Practically all forging operations on iron can be done more rapidly when it is at a high heat. Steel will not stand as high a temperature.

The Milk and Human Kindness Making Camembert

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Camembert

by:
from issue:

Camembert is wonderful to make, even easy to make once the meaning of the steps is known and the rhythm established. Your exceptionally well fed, housed and loved home cow will make just the best and cleanest milk for this method. A perfect camembert is a marvelous marriage of flavor and texture. The ripening process is only a matter of a few weeks and when they’re ripe they’re ripe and do not keep long.

Basic Blacksmithing Techniques

Illustrated guide to basic blacksmithing techniques, an excerpt from Blacksmithing: Basics For The Homestead.

The Milk and Human Kindness Making Swaledale

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Swaledale

by:
from issue:

Swaledale is one of the lost British cheeses, nearly extinct, along with other more obscure farmstead cheeses which were dropped because they were not suited for mechanical cutting – too crumbly. Too much loss. I dug the basic method out of Patrick Rance’s wonderful book of British cheeses and I’ve made it for years. I love it, everybody loves it, it’s a perfect cheese for rich Jersey milk, it takes very little time and trouble to make, it’s easy to age, delicious at one month, or a year.

Horseshoeing Part 3B

Horseshoeing Part 3B

Besides good, tough iron for the shoe, we need an anvil with a round horn and a small hole at one end, a round-headed turning-hammer, a round sledge, a stamping hammer, a pritchel of good steel, and, if a fullered shoe is to be made, a round fuller. Bodily activity and, above all else, a good eye for measurement are not only desirable, but necessary. A shoe should be made thoughtfully, but yet quickly enough to make the most of the heat.

Lightning Protection for the Farm

Lightning Protection for the Farm

by:
from issue:

Lightning-protection systems for buildings give lightning ready-made lines of low resistance. They do this by providing unbroken bodies of material that have lower resistance than any other in the immediate neighborhood. A protection system routes lightning along a known, controlled course between the air and the moist earth. Well-installed and maintained, a lightning-protection system will route lightning with over 90-percent effectiveness.

The Milk and Human Kindness Stanchion Floor

The Milk and Human Kindness: Plans for an Old Style Wooden Stanchion Floor

by:
from issue:

The basic needs that we are addressing here are as follows: To create a sunny, airy (not drafty), dry, convenient, accessible place to bring in our cow or cows, with or without calves, to be comfortably and easily secured for milking and other purposes such as vet checks, AI breeding, etc. where both you and your cow feel secure and content. A place that is functional, clean, warm and inviting in every way.

Laying Out Fields For Plowing

Laying Out Fields For Plowing

from issue:

Before starting to plow a field much time can be saved if the field is first staked out in uniform width lands. Methods that leave dead furrows running down the slope should be avoided, as water may collect in them and cause serious erosion. The method of starting at the sides and plowing around and around to finish in the center of the field will, if practiced year after year, create low areas at the dead furrows.

On The Anatomy of Thrift Fat & Slat

On the Anatomy of Thrift Part 3: Fat & Salt

On the Anatomy of Thrift is an instructional series Farmrun created with Farmstead Meatsmith. Their principal intention is instruction in the matters of traditional pork processing. In a broader and more honest context, OAT is a deeply philosophical manifesto on the subject of eating animals. Fat & Salt is the third and final video in the series. It is the conceptual conclusion to the illustrated, narrated story that weaves throughout the entire series, and deals instructionally in the matters of preserving pork.

Portable A-Frame

Portable A-Frame

by:
from issue:

These portable A-frames can be used for lots of lifting projects. Decades ago, when I was horselogging on the coast I used something similar to this to load my short logger truck. Great homemade tool.

Blacksmithing Secrets

Blacksmithing Secrets Part 1

by:
from issue:

Whether a farmer can afford a forge and anvil will depend upon the distance to a blacksmith shop, the amount of forging and other smithing work he needs to have done, and his ability as a mechanic. Although not every farmer can profitably own blacksmithing equipment, many farmers can. If a farmer cannot, he should remember that a great variety of repairs can be made with the use of only a few simple cold-metal working tools.

Log Arch

Log Arch

by:
from issue:

The arch was built on a small trailer axle that I cut down to 3 feet wide and tacked back together. This was done so that I could keep the wheels parallel. I cut the middle out after construction was complete. I used heavy wall pipe from my scrounge pile for the various frame parts. It is topped off with an angle iron bar for added strength and to provide a mount for the winch and some slots for extra chains.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT