Small Farmer's Journal

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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Plans for Hog Houses

by J.C. Wooley and R.L. Rickets
Ag. Exten. Circular 471 July 1942

Missouri Sunlit Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

This is an east and west type of house lighted by windows in the south roof. Covers are made to place over windows at night to prevent excessive heat loss. A single stack ventilation system with distributed inlets provides ventilation. Floor may be of concrete or hollow tile. Pen partitions may be of wood or metal. This plan takes the place of the original Missouri sunlit house since many farmers had difficulty in building it.

Modified A Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

This may be built in either a single or a double unit.

Combination Roof Hog House

Plans for Hog Houses

May be built single or double.

Nebraska Straw Loft Farrowing House

Plans for Hog Houses

This is a north and south type of house. Wall windows on the east, south and west furnish light. The straw loft furnishes insulation, provides a place for storing bedding and the straw so stored aids in controlling humidity. Pens are removable so that the house can be used as a feeding floor. A single stack ventilation system is satisfactory for this house.

Self Feeder for Hogs

Plans for Hog Houses

Hog Feeder

Plans for Hog Houses

Hog Trough

Plans for Hog Houses

A well made hog trough will save much valuable feed during the course of a season. The trough should be built from seasoned material and then given a good coating of creosote or tar before it is used. Ends may be left long to prevent trough being overturned.

Material List for Trough 12 feet long

1 2×8 16 Ends and narrow side 22 bd. ft.
1 2×10 12 Wide side 20 bd. ft.
1 2×2 16 Cross ties 5 1/2 bd. ft.
1 1?2 lbs. 16d spikes

Shipping Crate

Plans for Hog Houses
Plans for Hog Houses

It is often necessary for show or breeding purposes to ship individual hogs. If such shipments are made by freight or express a crate is essential. If a single hog is to be transported by truck the crate will be a great convenience and will enable the owner to transport an animal with minimum loss due to injury.

The ends of the crate are made to slide up so that the animal may be crated or driven from the crate without difficulty. For extra heavy hogs the corners should be bound with strap iron to give additional strength. Express companies require that the sides of the crate be tight at the bottom so that the animal cannot get his feet through when lying down and thus be injured.

Size of Crate to Build

Weight of Hog Length of Crate Width of Crate Height of Crate
25 to 75 35 12 23
75 to 100 46 18 28
150 to 250 54 20 34
250 to 350 60 20 38
350 to 500 64 24 40
500 to 800 80 30 48
800 to 1000 84 30 50

Material List for Shipping Crate (for Crate 60 inches long)

2 1×6 T&G 10′ long Doors 20 bd. ft.
4 1×6 10′ long Floors and Siding
3 1×4 10′ long Cross ties, top and bottom 10 bd. ft.
1 1×4 12′ long 4 bd. ft.
2 1×4 12′ long 16 bd. ft.
1 lb. 8d nails

Vaccinating Trough

Plans for Hog Houses

A convenient means for holding hogs for vaccination is almost essential on the hog farm today. The plan shown can be made very easily and cheaply and will save much labor and may save injury to the animals.

Material List for Vaccinating Trough

1 2×12 8′ 16 bd. ft.
1 2×4 12′ 8 bd. ft.
1 1×4 4′ 2 bd. ft.
1/2 lb. 16d nails

Rubbing Post

Plans for Hog Houses

A cheap and fairly efficient type of hog oiler can be made as shown. Grooves cut in the post will facilitate feeding the oil into the burlap. Frequent applications of oil will be necessary to make this effective.

Loading Chute

Plans for Hog Houses

Where hogs are frequently hauled by wagon or truck, a portable loading chute is a great convenience. By use of a suitable arrangement of pens and gates, hogs may be loaded with a minimum effort and with a small amount of loss from worrying the animals.

Such a structure must be well braced if it is to give long service.

Material List for Loading Chute

2 2×4 16 Studs, braces, etc. 22 bd. ft.
1 2×4 14 Studs and braces 10 bd. ft.
2 2×8 16 Floor 44 bd. ft.
1 1×4 12 Braces 3 bd. ft
5 1×6 16 Sides 80 bd. ft.
1 lb. 16d spikes
1 lb. 8d common nails

Ringing Chute

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

The type of ringing chute shown has been found to be very satisfactory in regard to its mechanical construction and has also been found to be a great labor saver on the farm. Some men who have not seen this chute used have felt that there would be difficulty in catching the animals to be run. If the stanchion is set with an opening just large enough for the hog to get his head through, he will try to escape and can be easily caught. No difficulty in catching the hogs has been encountered in using this chute.

Material List for Ringing Chute

2 2×4 16 Studs and stanchions 22 bd. ft.
2 2×4 10 Cross ties 14 bd. ft.
1 1×6 14 Floor 7 bd. ft.
4 1×4 14 Sides 20 bd. ft.
14 3/8″x5″ Carriage bolts
1 1/4″x4″ Carriage bolt
1 lb. 8d common nails

Frost Proof Drinking Fountain

sfj_plans_for_hog_houses_14

The fountain shown in the cut can be placed so that the float chamber will not freeze. If the drinking trough is placed to face the south, little trouble will be encountered with freezing in this. A fountain like this built into the hog shed is very satisfactory.

Material List for Frost Proof Drinking Fountain

  • 1/2 Yd. gravel
  • 5 sacks cement
  • 1/2 sack hydrated lime
  • Float and check valve
  • Pipe
  • Reinforcement

Movable Waterer

Plans for Hog Houses

It is often desirable to confine hogs in a field where there is no water. In hogging down corn or other crops, there is often no water available in the field. This movable waterer will meet the needs of such cases.

Material List for Movable Waterer

1 4×4 10′ long 14 bd. ft.
1 2×12 12′ long 24 bd. ft.
1 oil barrel
1 patent waterer

Concrete Hog Wallow

Plans for Hog Houses

A hog wallow properly built and cared for is a necessity on a farm where fat hogs are being carried over through the hot weather of summer. The hog will stay in the water long enough to get cooled off and will seek a place in the shade. The evaporation of the water will keep him cool for quite a little time. No hogs have been lost from heat at the University Farm when hog wallows were available. Quite a number were lost annually before the installation of this equipment.

In hot weather plenty of water should be kept in the wallow. If this is done, hogs will not lay in it for any length of time and a wallow of the size shown will serve a larger number of hogs. A small amount of oil in the water, will keep the hogs from drinking it and will be of value in keeping them free from vermin.

If the wallow can be located in the shade of a tree, the roof can be omit- ted, but if shade is not available, the roof should be built as shown. Wherever possible surface drainage should be provided as shown. Underground drains will soon clog up and fail to work.

Material List for Concrete Hog Wallow

2 lbs.

11 sacks cement (mix 1 to 4)
2 yards gravel
10 steel posts
2 2×6 10′ roof supports 20 bd. ft.
2 2×6 16′ roof supports 32 bd. ft.
Boxing 16′ lengths
10 3/8″x8″ U-bolts
1/2 lb. 16d spikes
8d common nails
1/4 gal. paint

Herding Gate

Plans for Hog Houses

For separating hogs or driving them into wagons or pens, a herding gate carried in front of the driver furnishes a much more effective barrier than a pair of moving arms. The gate must be made as light and strong as possible. Cypress is an excellent wood for this kind of construction.

Material List for Herding Gate

3 1×4 12′ Cypress or soft pine 12 bd. ft.
1/8 lb. 6d nails

Salt Feeders

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

Spotlight On: Livestock

Chicken

The Best Chicken Pie Ever

by:
from issue:

She has one more gift to give: Chicken Pie.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Step Ahead: 23rd Annual Horse Progress Days 2016

by:
from issue:

I had only been to Horse Progress Days once before, at Mount Hope, Ohio in 2008. It had been an eye-opener, showing how strong and in touch with sustainable farming values the Amish are, and how innovative and sensible their efforts could be. So at the 23rd annual event in Howe, Indiana, I was there partly looking for signs of continuity, and partly for signs of change. Right off I spotted an Amish man with a Blue Tooth in his ear, talking as he walked along.

How To Dry Up A Doe Goat

How To Dry Up A Doe Goat

You are probably thinking why would I want to dry up a doe? If the plan is to rebreed the doe, then she will need time to rebuild her stamina. Milk production takes energy. Kid production takes energy, too. If the plan is to have a fresh goat in March, then toward the end of October start to dry her up. The first thing to do is cut back on her grain. Grain fuels milk production.

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 4

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 4

by:
from issue:

Over the last few years of making hay, the mowing, turning and making tripods has settled into a fairly comfortable pattern, but the process of getting it all together for the winter is still developing. In the beginning I did what everyone else around here does and got it baled, but one year I decided to try one small stack. The success of this first stack encouraged me to do more, and now most of my hay is stacked loose.

Work Horse Handbook

Grooming Work Horses

The serviceability of the work horse may be increased or decreased according to the care which is bestowed upon him. If he is groomed in a perfunctory fashion his efficiency as an animal motor is lessened. On the other hand, if he is well groomed he is snappier and fresher in appearance and is constantly up on the bit.

On The Anatomy of Thrift Fat & Slat

On the Anatomy of Thrift Part 3: Fat & Salt

On the Anatomy of Thrift is an instructional series Farmrun created with Farmstead Meatsmith. Their principal intention is instruction in the matters of traditional pork processing. In a broader and more honest context, OAT is a deeply philosophical manifesto on the subject of eating animals. Fat & Salt is the third and final video in the series. It is the conceptual conclusion to the illustrated, narrated story that weaves throughout the entire series, and deals instructionally in the matters of preserving pork.

Ask A Teamster Driving

Ask A Teamster: Driving

I have been questioned (even criticized) about my slow, gentle, repetitious approach “taking too much time” and all the little steps being unnecessary when one can simply “hitch ‘em tied back to a well-broke horse they can’t drag around, and just let ‘em figure it out on their own.” I try to give horses the same consideration I would like if someone was teaching me how to do something new and strange.

Shoeing Stocks

An article from the out-of-print Winter 1982 Issue of SFJ.

The Big Hitch

The Big Hitch

In 1925 Slim Moorehouse drove a hitch of 36 Percheron Horses pulling 10 grain wagons loaded with 1477 bushesl of wheat through the Calgary Stampede Parade. It is out intention to honor a man who was a great horseman and a world record holder. The hitch, horses and wagons, was 350 feet in length and he was the only driver.

Black Pigs and Speckled Beans

Black Pigs & Speckled Beans

by:
from issue:

As country pigs go the Large Blacks are superb. They are true grazing pigs, thriving on grass and respectful of fences. Protected from sunburn by their dark skin and hair they are tolerant of heat and cold and do well even in rugged conditions. Having retained valuable instincts, the sows are naturally careful, dedicated, and able mothers. The boars I’ve seen are friendly and docile.

Littlefield Notes Making Your Horses Work For You

LittleField Notes: Making Your Horses Work For You Part 1

by:
from issue:

The practical everyday working of horses and mules in harness has always been at the heart of what the Small Farmer’s Journal is about. And like the Journal, a good horse powered farm keeps the horses at the center: the working nucleus of the farm. All the tractive effort for the pulling of machines, hauling in of crops, hauling out of manures, harvesting and planting is done as much as is practicable with the horses.

Plans for Hog Houses

Plans for Hog Houses

by: ,
from issue:

Missouri Sunlit Hog House: This is an east and west type of house lighted by windows in the south roof. A single stack ventilation system with distributed inlets provides ventilation. Pen partitions may be of wood or metal. This plan takes the place of the original Missouri sunlit house since many farmers had difficulty in building it.

The Milk and Human Kindness Stanchion Floor

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Friends with Your Wild Heifer

by:
from issue:

So let’s just say this is your first experience with cows, you’ve gone to your local dairy farm, purchased a beautiful bred heifer who is very skittish, has never had a rope on her, or been handled or led, and you’re making arrangements to bring her home. It ought to be dawning on you at this point that you need to safely and securely convey this heifer to your farm and then you need to keep her confined until she begins to calm down enough that she knows she’s home, and she knows where she gets fed.

Expanding the Use of the Heavy Draught Horse in Europe

Expanding the Use of the Heavy Draught Horse in Europe

“La Route du Poisson”, or “The Fish Run,” is a 24 hour long relay which starts from Boulogne on the coast at 9 am on Saturday and runs through the night to the outskirts of Paris with relays of heavy horse pairs until 9 am Sunday with associated events on the way. The relay “baton” is an approved cross country competition vehicle carrying a set amount of fresh fish.

Living With Horses

Living With Horses

by:
from issue:

The French breed of Ardennes is closer to what the breed has been in the past. The Ardennes has always been a stockier type of horse, rude as its environment. Today the breed has dramatically changed into a real heavy horse. If the Ardennes had an average weight between 550 and 700kg in the first part of the last century, the balance shows today 1000kg and more. Thus the difference between the Ardennes and their “big” sisters, the Brabants in Belgium, or the Trait du Nord in France, has gone.

Working Steers and Oxen on the Small Farm

Working Steers and Oxen on the Small Farm

by:
from issue:

For centuries, the skills of training steers for work and the craft of building yokes and related equipment was passed down from generation to generation. It was common for a young boy or girl to be responsible for the care and training of a team from calves to the age of working capability. Many farms trained a team each year, either for sale or for future replacement in their own draft program.

Lineback Cattle

Lineback Cattle

by:
from issue:

Cattle with lineback color patterns have occurred throughout the world in many breeds. In some cases this is a matter of random selection. In others, the markings are a distinct characteristic of the breed; while in some it is one of a number of patterns common to a local type. Considering that livestock of all classes have been imported to the United States, it is not surprising that we have our own Lineback breed.

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 1

Hay Making with a Single Horse Part 1

by:
from issue:

For the last ten years, I have made hay mostly with a single horse. This has not necessarily been out of choice, as at one time I had hoped to be farming on a larger scale with more horses. Anyway, it does little good to dwell on ‘what if ’. The reality is that I am able to make hay, and through making and modifying machinery, I probably have a better understanding of hay making and the mechanics of draught.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT