Small Farmer's Journal

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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

moonsigns

A simple but practical demonstration of planetary influence is to plant some seed when the Moon is in a fruitful sign such as CANCER, which is the most fruitful of all the Zodiac; then when the Moon is in the barren sign, LEO, plant some more of the same lot of seed. The results will clearly show the wisdom and advantage of working in harmony with Nature-putting your work in time with her vibrations, so to speak, because of the difference in the yield form the two plantings.

Planting is best done in the signs of SCORPIO, PISCES, TAURUS or CANCER: all fruitful signs. Astrologers say it is best to plant all things which yield above ground in the increase of the Moon and things which yield below ground when the Moon is decreasing.

Never plant anything in the barren sign. They are only good for grubbing, trimming, deadening and destroying noxious growths.

As the Zodiacal sign, LIBRA, denotes beauty, being also an airy sign, it is considered best for flowers. The seeds should be planted in the First Quarter of the Moon unless seeds from the plant are desired in which case, plant between the Second Quarter and the Full Moon.

First Quarter – Increasing Moon

(New Moon to First Quarter Moon)

During the First Quarter of the Moon plant the following: asparagus, broccoli, brussels sprouts, barley, cabbage, cauliflower, celery, cucumbers, corn, cress, endive, kohl rabi, lettuce, leeks, oats, onions, parsley and spinach; also seeds of flowering plants.

Avoid the first day of Moon for planting, also the days on which it changes Quarters.

Second Quarter – Increasing Moon

(First Quarter Moon to Full Moon)

During the Second Quarter of the Moon plant beans, egg plant, muskmelon, peas, pepper, pumpkin, squash, tomatoes and watermelon.

When possible plant seed while the Moon is in the fruitful sign of CANCER, SCORPIO or PISCES. The next best signs are TAURUS and CAPRICORN.

Third Quarter – Decreasing Moon

(Full Moon to Last Quarter Moon)

During the Third Quarter of the Moon plant the following: artichoke, beets, carrots, chickory, parsnips, potatoes, radish, rutabaga, turnip, and all bulbous flowering plants.

Fourth Quarter – Decreasing Moon

(Last Quarter Moon to New Moon)

During the Fourth (last) Quarter of the Moon turn the sod, pull weeds and destroy noxious growths, especially when the Moon is in the barren signs GEMINI, LEO, and VIRGO.

Pick apples and pears during the old Moon and the bruised spots will dry up. If picked in the new Moon the spots will rot.

Harvest all crops when the Moon is growing old; they keep better and longer.

Dig root crops for seed during the Third Quarter of the Moon. They will keep longer and are usually dryer and better.

Grain intended for future use or seed should be harvested at the increase of the Moon.

Fruit and vegetables gathered just before Full Moon in the Second Quarter will usually stand shipment very much better than others.

Spotlight On: Farming Systems & Approaches

Fjordworks A History of Wrecks Part 2

Fjordworks: A History of Wrecks Part 2

It is always fascinating and at times a little disconcerting to watch how seamlessly the macro-economics of trying to make a living as a farmer in such an out-of-balance society can morph us into shapes we never would have dreamed of when we were getting started. This year we will be putting in a refrigerated walk-in cooler which will allow us to put up more storage-share vegetables.

Cayuse Vineyards

Small Farm, USA: Cayuse Vineyards

by:
from issue:

How did the grape find itself here on the outskirts of Milton? If you ask one man, Christophe Baron, the answer is simple. “It’s the cobblestone. (The ground) reminds me of home”. For Christophe, home refers to France and the stone littered earth from which many famous French wines grow. Hailing from a family of vigneron champenois, Mr. Baron came upon this corner of the state by chance, saw its signature geology, and decided to establish his domaine right here in northeast Oregon.

Chicken Guano: Top-Notch Fertilizer

Whoever thought I’d be singing the praises of chicken poop? I am, and I’m not the only one. Chickens are walking nitrogen-rich manure bins.

On-Farm Meat Processing

The demand for fresh, local meat products – with no taint of industrial process – is absolutely staggering.

The First Year

The First Year

by:
from issue:

Prior to last year, I had felt I knew the nuances of the land quite well and fancied myself as knowledgeable about the course of the natural world. Outdoors was where I felt the most comfortable. The fresh air and endless views of fields, hills and valleys renewed my spirit and refreshed my mind. I didn’t think there was much that could fluster me when it came to the land. Until I became an organic farmer.

Starting Your Farm

Starting Your Farm: Chapter 5

You might think that your new farm is fenced all wrong, or that a certain tree is in the wrong place, or that a wet area would be better drained, or that this gully would make a good pond site, or that a depression in the road should be filled, or that the old sheds should all come down right away. Well maybe you’re right on all counts. But maybe, you’re wrong.

Sustainable Forestry

Sustainable Forestry

by:
from issue:

After 70 plus years of industrial logging, the world’s forests are as degraded and diminished as its farmlands, or by some estimates even more so. And this is a big problem for all of us, because the forests of the world do much more than supply lumber, Brazil nuts, and maple syrup. Farmlands produce food, a basic need to be sure, but forests are responsible for protecting and purifying the air, water and soil which are even more basic.

Cultivating Questions A Diversity of Cropping Systems

Cultivating Questions: A Diversity of Cropping Systems

As a matter of convenience, we plant all of our field vegetables in widely spaced single rows so we can cultivate the crops with one setup on the riding cultivator. Row cropping makes sense for us because we are more limited by labor than land and we don’t use irrigation for the field vegetables. As for the economics of planting produce in work horse friendly single rows, revenue is comparable to many multiple row tractor systems.

LittleField Notes Farm Log

LittleField Notes: Farm Log

by:
from issue:

My starting every column with a discussion of the weather set me to thinking about that old clichéd idea of talking about the weather; how it is all old men talk about downtown at the local coffee shop; how they sit for hours telling endless lies about how the snow was deeper, the nights colder and the hills steeper when they were young. However, clichés have basis in truth, and it is true that weather is a wonderful conversation opener.

Week in the Life of D Acres

Week in the Life of D Acres

by:
from issue:

D Acres of New Hampshire in Dorchester, a permaculture farm, sustainability center, and non-profit educational organization, is a bit of a challenge to describe. Join us for this week-in-the-life tour, a little of everything that really did unfold in this manner. Extraordinary, perhaps, only in that these few November days were entirely ordinary.

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 1

Our mild climate makes it too easy to overwinter cover crops. Then the typically wet springs (and, on our farm, wet soils) let the cover put on loads of topgrowth before getting on the soil. Buckwheat is the only crop that I can be certain will winterkill. Field peas, oats, annual rye and crimson clover have all overwintered here. Any suggestions?

Loose Hay with Ryan Foxley

Loose Hay with Ryan Foxley A Farmrun Production by Andrew Plotsky

The Farmer and the Horse

The Farmer & The Horse

In New Jersey — land of The Sopranos, Jersey Shore, and the Turnpike — farmland is more expensive than anywhere else. It’s not an easy place to try to start a career as a farmer. But for a new generation of farmers inspired by sustainability, everything seems possible. Even a farm powered by draft horses.

The Best Kept Secret, Revisited

The Best Kept Secret, Revisited

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from issue:

At the same time that U.S. commercial beekeeping is circling down in a death spiral, hobby beekeeping is booming and almost every beekeeping club in the country has at least twice as many members as it did twenty years ago. What this means is that if you are fortunate enough to live in a place with relatively clean and varied sources of pollen and nectar, the potential for a successful family-sized commercial apiary is better now than it has been for many decades.

Farm To School Programs Take Root

All aim to re-connect school kids with healthy local food.

Starting Seeds

From Dusty Shelves: A WWII era article from Farming For Security

How To Get Into Farming With No Money

How To Get Into Farming With No Money

by:
from issue:

Let’s assume the beginning ‘farmer’ has absolutely nothing. Nothing but a will to farm and a reasonably normal body. The very first thing you must do is search out a farmer, preferably a farmer who farms close to the way that you want to farm. You must watch him, ask questions, do as you are told and learn everything you can. Very shortly you will be on your own and you will find that the more you learn now, the better you will be when you have only yourself to rely on.

Wild Potatoes and Calcium

Wild potatoes bring increased calcium for better tubers.Have you ever cut into a potato to find a dark spot or hollow part? Early research shows that these defects are likely the result of calcium deficiencies in the potato — and that tuber calcium is genetically linked to tuber quality.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT