Small Farmer's Journal

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Today I Prepare

by Lynn Miller

Summering towards
seated moments
found without splinter
found with or without care.
No audience save the
critical unbecoming self.
Were it a long race
to now,
surprised to be amongst
the last running
with a chance to go
to the target beyond end,
tanks full with cupped felt.
So this is the deal.
This is the living life I’ve dealt myself.
Quite past wonderful,
the peaceful purpose
of this old broken down ranch,
these dusty aromatic canyons,
these patient horses,
those skinned over paints.
The big things to come
are all in the building
and the buildings.
There is in the oldest parts of my self
a fear of in-completion,
a fragile marker
in comic fellowship
with arrival.
Yesterday’s “always”.
The stretched and bent note
deep deep within
a return to first
working love.
The three geldings
each a different voice
plucked with dusty steps
those strings my hands chorded
towards tenuous melody,
dirt stirring.
Last night’s thunderstorm
was a lovely perfection
of angry sky,
sharp crackles of light,
wind rushing to get elsewhere,
and wet rain.
All of it laid
over the pulverized dustiness
of our bone-dry desert.
This morning
the shaded moistened sky
is uncertain
of its course for the day.
How is it
that being inside this weather
I find myself
refreshed and hopeful?

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Spotlight On: People

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Mule Powered Wrecker Service

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