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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PST

Stationary Baler

Stationary Baler

Stationary Baler: Engineering and Evidence

Our friend, Mark Schwarzburg came by the office with an old wooden box he inherited from his great great great grandfather, Henry Schwarzburg. In it is a lovely, very old working wooden model of the stationary baler Henry helped to invent. Also were found, on old oil-skin paper, beautiful original engineer’s drawings for patent registry; and a brochure for the actual resulting manufactured implement. I just knew some of you would get as excited as I did seeing this material and feeling the history of it all. Thanks to Mark’s sharing we can enjoy and wonder… LRM

Stationary Baler

DESCRIPTION OF THE NOXALL No. 1

This is a full circle, double-stroke perpetual baling chamber; it is mounted on four wooden wheels thirty inches high (except the hind wheels under the all-steel press, which are thirty-six inches high). Its workings are simple and durable; no platform for the team to climb over; no chains or cable, not even a link. The power is composed of a variable S-shaped gear, and is constructed that it gives the plunger two strokes to the round of the team. There is not a spring, trip-dog or unshipping point about it. The power gears and connection with the compound levers are so arranged that the power moves fast at the beginning of each stroke, when the material us loose, but as the density of the charge increase the power compounds proportionately until the center is reached.

The sweep is twelve feet long, and in passing over the center there is no jerk whatever on the team; therefore it needs neither tongue nor neck yoke to prevent the sweep from crowing the team. It is fed from the top with a fork, and has no doors to open and shut. The pressing chamber is fitted with retainer hooks to prevent the hay from springing back into the pressing chamber.

Stationary Baler

Owing to the particular shaped gears, it has five points where the power is increased, which equalizes the draft and makes it light on the team. It is easily set for operation, or put in shape for moving. Three men and a team are required to do the work; the team is tied to the lead pole, which they will follow round in a circle – usually without a driver – but a seat is furnished with each press, in case a boy should be needed to drive.

IT HAS A POSITIVE MOTION FOR DRAWING THE BEATER BACK

Any one who has operated a press that depended on the expansion of the material, springs, weights or other devices to bring the beater back, need not be told how uncertain they are. We will admit that they will bring it back the majority of times; but it is the times that they fail which causes so much annoyance and delay. With the Noxall the operator will not be annoyed by the beater not coming back, for it is pulled back by the team, and so long as they travel the beater must make regular back and forward motions, whether there is hay in the press or not. This makes it very convenient to prime the press, and also enables the operator to make a loose pressed bale. It is only in case it does not rebound that it is pulled back by the team.

Stationary Baler

END VIEW OF BALING CHAMBER

By referring to the adjoining cut (above), the reader can get a fair idea of the mode of constructing our steel frame presses, and it will at once commend itself to the thoughtful reader as being a much better way than the common one of turning the angles in, for the following reasons: It is well known that the inside of a baling press must be smooth in order to allow the hay to pass through unobstructed, and if both the upper and lower legs of the angles are turned in it is necessary to countersink every bolt and rivet in it; hence every bolt must of necessity be a round-headed one, leaving no way of tightening the bolt when once it gets rusty or the threads become battered. Besides, the countersinking process brings one side of the lining to a sharp edge at the hole, leaving it no bearing to speak of and soon allowing it to work loose, or the sharp edge of the lining to cut the bolt off; but by turning the upper and lower legs of the four angles out, as shown in above cut, forms a projection at the four corners of frame, to which we can fasten the lining, braces and other castings without the necessity of counter-sinking a single bolt or rivet in the top or bottom lining of the baling chamber. This mode of construction enables us to use a rivet long enough to form a good head on the under-side, and to use square-headed bolts, which is a great advantage, as they can at all times be readily put in or taken out and kept perfectly tight.

Stationary Baler

NEEDS NO BUMPERS

To relieve the press from the jar caused by the beater rebounding too hard. The pitman is carried over the small gear wheel which travels in a circle, giving the beater a positive and almost noiseless motion.

The folders used on all of our presses do not tear or break the hay, for the reason that there are no sharp edges for the hay to come in contact with. The baling chamber is long, thus giving the bale ample time to form before reaching the open sides of the press.

Stationary Baler

DESCRIPTION OF NOXALL No. 2

The Noxall No. 2 is strictly portable, full circle, two strokes to the round of team; sweep twelve feet long; is made with perpetual baling chamber, has suitable retainer hooks and is metal lined. This press is mounted on steel wheels having tires three inches wide; is built throughout of good material and is of good workmanship. It is operated with one team and three men; the team is tied to a lead pole working inside of the triangle. The one in the end of the pitman is driving the roller; the second is a guide, which holds the end one in the center of power. The pitman moves fast at the beginning of each stroke, but as the density of the charge increases, the motion becomes slow and powerful until the power strikes the third and middle roller and forces it against the trip lever, which causes the power to unship from the sweep head and allows the plunger to rebound, thus opening the feed hole for the next charge. The pressing and unshipping parts are all operated by rollers, thereby reducing the friction to a minimum.

The connection between the press and the power needs no bridging for the team to cross over, as it is little more than an ordinary step for the team; nor is there any pull on the team while it is crossing the power sill. We use a coil spring four feet long to assist the plunger to rebound, but generally it is not needed after the press is started. This spring is adjustable in order to give the required force to insure rebound. We also use a rubber bumper to check the rebound should there too much. This press is equipped with an automatic folder, and has tension on four sides of the bale. Built in the same manner and of the same material that is used in the construction of all of our other presses.

CAST STEEL POWER HEAD

We have been furnishing the Noxall No. 2 with a cast steel power head, and we have not been called upon to replace a single one, although we have agreed to do so free of charge should any break within a year from date of purchase.

We have further improved the power by making the trip-dog of malleable iron instead of cast iron, and in connection with the cast steel power head, we have placed the power of the Noxall No. 2 beyond the probability of a break.

Stationary Baler

CAPACITY

How many tons can be pressed per day? This is very often asked us, and we answer that so much depends on the men, hay and team that it is impossible to give a satisfactory answer in every instance. Some crews of men can handle 10 to 12 tons seemingly as easy as others can 6 to 8; then again, some hay is short, fine and heavy, while other is just the reverse.

We do not wish to place the capacity so great that a customer would be disappointed after getting the press; still, we do wish to do our presses justice, so we answer that 7 to 10 tons per day is fair and good work. By this we mean ordinary work one day after the other, and not a rush for an hour or two under favorable conditions. The Noxall Presses are guaranteed to press as much material as any other presses of their kind in the market, regardless of the claims of others, for nearly always it is customary for press manufactures to give the capacity at so much per hour; but this is misleading, as any one knows, because on a test perhaps a ton and a half can be pressed in one hour with a two-horse press. But such a rate as this could not be kept up for a week, or hardly a single day.

Stationary Baler

Stationary Baler

Stationary Baler

Spotlight On: Farming Systems & Approaches

Cultivating Questions A Diversity of Cropping Systems

Cultivating Questions: A Diversity of Cropping Systems

As a matter of convenience, we plant all of our field vegetables in widely spaced single rows so we can cultivate the crops with one setup on the riding cultivator. Row cropping makes sense for us because we are more limited by labor than land and we don’t use irrigation for the field vegetables. As for the economics of planting produce in work horse friendly single rows, revenue is comparable to many multiple row tractor systems.

Cayuse Vineyards

Small Farm, USA: Cayuse Vineyards

by:
from issue:

How did the grape find itself here on the outskirts of Milton? If you ask one man, Christophe Baron, the answer is simple. “It’s the cobblestone. (The ground) reminds me of home”. For Christophe, home refers to France and the stone littered earth from which many famous French wines grow. Hailing from a family of vigneron champenois, Mr. Baron came upon this corner of the state by chance, saw its signature geology, and decided to establish his domaine right here in northeast Oregon.

Sustainable

Sustainable

Sustainable is a documentary film that weaves together expert analysis of America’s food system with a powerful narrative of one extraordinary farmer who is determined to create a sustainable future for his community. In a region dominated by commodity crops, Marty Travis has managed to maintain a farming model that is both economically viable and environmentally safe.

A Short History of the Horse-Drawn Mower

A Short History of the Horse-Drawn Mower

Book Excerpt: The enclosed gear, late model John Deere, Case, Oliver, David Bradley, and McCormick Deering International mowers I (we) are so fond of had a zenith of popular manufacture and use that lasted just short of 25 years. Millions of farmers with millions of mowers, built to have a serviceable life of 100 plus years, all pushed into the fence rows. I say, it was far too short of a period.

Chicken Guano: Top-Notch Fertilizer

Whoever thought I’d be singing the praises of chicken poop? I am, and I’m not the only one. Chickens are walking nitrogen-rich manure bins.

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 1

Our mild climate makes it too easy to overwinter cover crops. Then the typically wet springs (and, on our farm, wet soils) let the cover put on loads of topgrowth before getting on the soil. Buckwheat is the only crop that I can be certain will winterkill. Field peas, oats, annual rye and crimson clover have all overwintered here. Any suggestions?

Horse Labor Instead of Tractors

Horse Labor Instead of Tractors

by:
from issue:

Three different parcels of land were committed for a series of tests to directly compare the impact of tractors and horses on the land. One side of each parcel was worked only with horses and the other only with tractors. There were measurable differences between each side of the worked areas; the land’s capacity to hold water and greater aeration were up to 45cm higher in areas worked by horses as opposed to tractors.

Congo Farm Project

Congo Farm Project

by:
from issue:

I was at day one, standing outside an old burnt-out Belgian plantation house, donated to us by the progressive young chief of the village of Luvungi. My Congolese friend and I had told him that we would need to hire some workers to help clear the land around the compound, and to put a new roof on the building. I thought we should be able to attract at least 20 workers. Then, I looked out to see a crowd of about 800 eager villagers, each one with their own hoe.

Raised Bed Gardening

Raised Bed Gardening

by:
from issue:

Raised beds may not be right for everyone, and our way is not the only way. I have seen raised beds made from rows of 5’ diameter kiddy pools, and heard of a fellow who collected junk refrigerators from the dump and lined them up on their backs into a rainbow of colored enameled steel raised beds. Even rows of five-gallon pails filled with plants count as raised beds in my estimation. Do it any way you care to, but do it if it’s right for you.

Such a One Horse Outfit

Such a One Horse Outfit

by:
from issue:

One day my stepfather brought over a magazine he had recently subscribed to. It was called Small Farmer’s Journal published by a guy named Lynn Miller. That issue had a short story about an old man that used a single small mule to garden and skid firewood with. I was totally fascinated with the prospect of having a horse and him earning his keep. It sorta seemed like having your cake and eating it too.

Wild Potatoes and Calcium

Wild potatoes bring increased calcium for better tubers.Have you ever cut into a potato to find a dark spot or hollow part? Early research shows that these defects are likely the result of calcium deficiencies in the potato — and that tuber calcium is genetically linked to tuber quality.

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

We were inspired to try no-tilling vegetables into cover crops after attending the Groffs’ field day in 1996. No-tilling warm season vegetables has proved problematic at our site due to the mulch of cover crop residues keeping the soil too cool and attracting slugs. We thought that no-tilling garlic into this cover crop of oats and Canadian field peas might be the ticket as garlic seems to appreciate being mulched.

Cultivating Questions A Horsedrawn Guidance System

Cultivating Questions: A Horsedrawn Guidance System

Market gardening became so much more relaxing for us and the horses after developing a Horsedrawn Guidance System. Instead of constantly steering the horses while trying to lay out straight rows or cultivate the vegetables, we could put the team on autopilot and focus our whole attention on these precision tasks. The guidance system has been so effective that we have trusted visiting chefs to cultivate the lettuce we planned on harvesting for them a few weeks later.

Starting Your Farm

Starting Your Farm: Chapter 4

Assuming that you’ve found a farm you want to buy, next you’ll need to determine if you can buy it. If you have sold your property, and/or saved your money, and have the means to buy the farm you are sitting pretty. If you do not have the full price of a considered farm, in cash or any other form, you will likely have to look for financing.

Cuban Agriculture

Cuban Agriculture

by:
from issue:

In December of 1979, Mary Jo and I spent two weeks traveling in Cuba on a “Farmer’s Tour of Cuba”. The tour was a first of its kind. It was organized in the U.S. by farmers, was made up of U.S. farmers and agriculturally oriented folks, and was sponsored in Cuba by A.N.A.P., the National Association of Independent Farmers. As we learned about farming we also learned how the individuals, farms, and communities we visited fit into the greater social and economic structure of Cuba.

Soil, Vegetation, and Acidity

From Dusty Shelves: Audels Gardeners and Growers Guide teaches us about soil acidity.

Laying Out Fields For Plowing

Laying Out Fields For Plowing

from issue:

Before starting to plow a field much time can be saved if the field is first staked out in uniform width lands. Methods that leave dead furrows running down the slope should be avoided, as water may collect in them and cause serious erosion. The method of starting at the sides and plowing around and around to finish in the center of the field will, if practiced year after year, create low areas at the dead furrows.

Planting Calendar and Other Diagrams

From Dusty Shelves: A 1943 calendar for seeding your vegetable garden.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT