Small Farmer's Journal

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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

STEP AHEAD: 23rd Annual Horse Progress Days 2016

by Paul Hunter of Seattle, WA
photos by Paul Hunter & Jerry Hunter

“There is no barn without flies.” – Laura Hunter

I had only been to Horse Progress Days once before, at Mount Hope, Ohio in 2008. It had been an eye-opener, showing how strong and in touch with sustainable farming values the Amish are, and how innovative and sensible their efforts could be. So at the 23rd annual event in Howe, Indiana, I was there partly looking for signs of continuity, and partly for signs of change.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Right off I spotted an Amish man with a Blue Tooth in his ear, talking as he walked along. There was a new posse of young mounted riders directing traffic and parking cars. Among novelties was a special program of demonstrations aimed at market gardening and small-scale farming, with equipment designed for single horses and small teams. There were systems to prepare soil, lay dripline and black plastic weed and moisture barrier all in one pass. For applications large and small there seems to be considerable emphasis on reducing the number of passes down the field, to help the farmer make more effective use of his and his draft animals’ time and energy.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

There was a strong set of demonstrations focused on logging and wood products, demonstrating tree pruning high in several old trees adjoining the fields, with chainsaw work, and portable wood mills. There was even an automated firewood processor that spat out an endless heap cut and split to size, that it did everything but stack, and a noisy machine from Montana that drilled holes and pounded fence posts in the ground on demand.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Notable among exhibits new this year was a demonstration of dogs to herd cattle, which alongside traditional sheep herding drew a large and appreciative crowd. Part mind-reading and part skillful maneuvering, the dogs were clearly appreciated and valued at their tasks.

There is a trend in miniature horses everywhere in evidence, as small hitches were used to pull both grownups and children all over the fair grounds in a variety of carts and wagons, along with the traditional larger and more comfortable people-movers.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Indoors a huge 3.4 acre facility sheltered upwards of a hundred booths, that offered an impressive range of the latest energy-saving and planet-saving technologies, as well as round-pen demonstrations and talks that drew large audiences. Exhibitors were not shy about making use of solar and wind power, and showed how many Amish farmers and manufacturers are now employing computers to manage their marketing, accounting and other needs.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Yet outdoors in the field the big horses are still the stars of the show, just as strong and well-mannered in large hitches as I recalled from eight years ago. There was more mechanization, more choices and refinements of sturdy ideas, like White Horse Manufacturing and Pioneer’s new plowing and cultivating systems, and Miller’s Machinery cultimulchers. The biggest no-till drill in 2008 had been pulled by six horses, and cost around $23,000. This year the biggest no-till drill was pulled by eight horses, and cost $32,000. The homemade ice cream was every bit as delicious as ever, churned by little “hit-or-miss” John Deere irrigation pump engines that had been lovingly restored.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

But I was also looking for other clues of health and longevity for small farmers. And maybe I was expecting faint signs of trouble, at least a few edgy looks in the angry and thin-skinned election season that prevails outside Amish communities. I thought I’d hit upon something when I saw groups of Amish teenage boys wearing stocking caps instead of their usual straw hats. Could these be signs of incipient rebellion? But when asked, these boys said they were bicycle riders, and that they had hit on this solution for the windy roads in Northern Indiana, where gusts snatched off their straw hats and blew them all over.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

One notable new offering was a contest for amateur auctioneers, that drew an attentive audience of 5,000 around the main arena. The 18 contestants were each given three items to sell to the crowd, with the proceeds donated to charity. One particularly effective young auctioneer sprinkled a strangely memorable and jolly phrase throughout his patter. No matter what he was selling (mostly rakes and shovels and other small items) he’d chant “Buy-a-hen, buy-a-hen, Buy-um, buy-um, buy-um.”

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Finally, though, farming isn’t just a show full of diverse entertainments, it’s a living and a business grounded in a modest belief system, informed by a subtle science capable of great refinement. I was enormously cheered to see the Amish spirit still active and innovative in the farming arts and crafts, still deeply committed to the enterprise.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

As we were leaving I went past the picket line of lean brown horses favored by the Amish for their everyday buggies. Among the hundreds of horses waiting, socializing, I spotted two that had no harness or bridles, who were tied in halters. If character is what you do when no one is looking, here was a mark of character, of someone taking the small extra care to make his animals comfortable while they waited out the day, as long it took for their turn, to make the long trot home.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Three Belgians hitched to a White Horse Implements Leaf-Spring Plow

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Tiller’s International Oxen Span

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Belgian mules on covered transport wagon

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Four Belgians abreast on a cultimulcher

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Fjord team on a Pioneer Homesteader

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Team walks slow as two young Amish men set plants in holes that have been punched and watered through a black plastic mulch layer.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

This implement forms a raised bed and unrolls a plastic mulch layer.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Stout Belgian team skids a hardwood log to the sawmill.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Four Shires hitched to springtooth harrow.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

A team pulls a motorized field sprayer

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Young lady leads Belgian as Mama does security

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Steady team hitched to a broadcast seeder/spreader.

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Four Percherons on a disc harrow

Step Ahead Horse Progress Days 2016

Six abreast of uniform Belgians in tight formation pulling a cultimulcher.

Spotlight On: Crops & Soil

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate Part 2

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 2

Finding just the right cover crop-tillage combination for crops planted the last half of June has always been a real challenge in our location. While surface-tilling mature rye and vetch in May works well for fall crops established in July and August, this cover crop-tillage combo does not allow enough time for decomposition and moisture accumulation for end-of-June plantings.

Of Peace and Quiet

LittleField Notes: Of Peace and Quiet

by:
from issue:

Walk with me for a moment to the edge of the Waterfall Field. We can lean on the gate and let our gaze soak up the mid-summer scene: a perfect blue sky and not a breath of wind. Movement catches your eye, and in the distance you see a threesome hard at work in the hayfield. Two Suffolk horses, heads bobbing, making good time followed by a man comfortably seated on a mowing machine. The waist high grass and clover falls steadily in neat swaths behind the mower. What you can’t help but notice is the quiet.

Soil, Vegetation, and Acidity

From Dusty Shelves: Audels Gardeners and Growers Guide teaches us about soil acidity.

Cane Grinding

Cane Grinding: An Age-Old Georgia Tradition

by:
from issue:

Most sugar cane is processed in refineries to give us molasses, brown sugar, and various kinds of white sugar. However, some South Georgia farms that raise sugar cane still process it the old way to produce the special tasting sweetener for their own food. One such farm is the Rocking R Ranch in Kibbee, Georgia. It is owned by Charles and Patricia Roberts and their sons. The process they use has not changed in the past 100 years. This is how it is done.

Seed Quality from Two Perspectives

Seed Quality from Two Perspectives

by:
from issue:

We are approaching this from a seed quality standpoint, not just a seed saving one. Saving seed is fairly simple to do, but the results from planting those seeds can be very mixed; without a basis of understanding of seed quality, people can be disappointed and confused as to why they got the results they did. Both the home gardener and the seed company must understand seed quality to be successful in their respective endeavors.

Beautiful Grasses

What follow are a series of magnificent hundred-year old botanist’s watercolors depicting several useful grass varieties. Artworks such as this are found on the pages of Small Farmer’s Journal quite regularly and may be part of the reason that the small farm world considers this unusual magazine to be one of the world’s periodical gold standards.

Mullein Indigenous Friend to All

Mullein: Indigenous Friend to All

by:
from issue:

Mullein is a hardy native, soft and sturdy requiring no extra effort to thrive on your part. Whether you care to make your own medicines or not, consider mullein’s value to bees, bumblebees, butterflies, moths, dragonflies, who are needing nectar and nourishment that is toxin free and safe to consume. In this case, all you have to do is… nothing. What could be simpler?

How to Grow an Acre of Potatoes

How to Grow an Acre of Potatoes

by:
from issue:

Heretofore potato production in this country has been conducted along extensive rather than intensive lines. In other words, we have been satisfied to plant twice as many acres as should have been necessary to produce a sufficient quantity of potatoes for our food requirements. Present economic conditions compel the grower to consider more seriously the desirability of reducing the cost of production by increasing the yield per acre.

Cultivating Questions

Cultivating Questions: Follow-Up On Phosphorus

We like to think that the bio-extensive approach to market gardening minimizes the risk of overloading the soil with nutrients because the fallow lands make it possible to grow lots of cover crops to maintain soil structure and organic matter rather than relying on large quantities of manure and compost. However, we are now seeing the consequences of ignoring our own farm philosophy when we resorted to off-farm inputs to correct a phosphate deficiency.

Cultivating Questions

Cultivating Questions: Concerning the Bioextensive Market Garden

One of our goals when we first started farming here was to develop the farm as a self-contained nutrient system. Unlike the almost complete recycling of nutrients which can take place on a livestock operation, we are always amazed – even a little disturbed – to see how many tons of fertility and organic matter leave the market garden each year with so little returned to the good earth.

Raised Bed Gardening

Raised Bed Gardening

by:
from issue:

Raised beds may not be right for everyone, and our way is not the only way. I have seen raised beds made from rows of 5’ diameter kiddy pools, and heard of a fellow who collected junk refrigerators from the dump and lined them up on their backs into a rainbow of colored enameled steel raised beds. Even rows of five-gallon pails filled with plants count as raised beds in my estimation. Do it any way you care to, but do it if it’s right for you.

Marketable Cover Crops

Marketable Cover Crops

by:
from issue:

Our cover crops have to provide the benefits of smothering weeds, improving soil structure, and replenishing organic matter. They also have to produce some income. For these purposes, we use turnips, mustard and lettuce within our plant successions. I broadcast these seeds thickly on areas where cover crops are necessary and let them do their work.

Starting Seeds

From Dusty Shelves: A WWII era article from Farming For Security

Syrup From Oregons Big-Leaf Maple

Syrup From Oregon’s Big Leaf Maple

by:
from issue:

There is a great potential in establishment of a seasonal “sugarbush” industry for small farmers of the northwestern states, particularly western Oregon and Washington. Five syrup producing species of maples are found mainly east of the Rocky Mountains. The Box Elder and the Big-leaf Maple are the only syrup producing maples of the Pacific Northwest. Properly made syrup from these two western maples is indistinguishable from the syrup of maples of the midwestern and northeastern states.

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 1

Our mild climate makes it too easy to overwinter cover crops. Then the typically wet springs (and, on our farm, wet soils) let the cover put on loads of topgrowth before getting on the soil. Buckwheat is the only crop that I can be certain will winterkill. Field peas, oats, annual rye and crimson clover have all overwintered here. Any suggestions?

Purslane, Portahoopies and Plow Planted Peas

Purslane, Portahoopies and Plow Planted Peas

For those not familiar with this tasty, nutritious weed, purslane can be a real challenge to manage in vegetable crops for a number of reasons. The seeds of this weed remain viable for many years in the garden, and generally do not germinate until hot weather — that is, after many of the market garden crops have already been planted. To make matters worse, this succulent plant often reroots after cultivation. Purslane also grows so close to the ground that it is impossible to control by mowing.

Henpecked Compost and U-Mix Potting Soil

We have hesitated to go public with our potting mix, not because the formula is top secret, but because our greenhouse experience is limited in years and scale. Nevertheless, we would like to offer what we have learned in hopes of showing that something as seemingly insignificant as putting together a potting mix can be integrated into a systems approach to farming.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT