Sunfish Trapnest Poultry House Feather Clothes

Sunfish, Trapnest, Tin Poultry House and Feathers as Clothing

Sunfish Trapnest Poultry House Feather Clothes

Sunfish and I

This colorful little disc-shaped fish has many popular names. It is called pumpkin seed, tobacco box and sunfish because of its shape, and it also called bream and pond fish. (Out west the Bluegill, a variety of sunfish or bream, is extremely popular.) The sunfish lives in the eddies of clear brooks and ponds. It is a near relative to the rock bass and also of the black bass and, relative to it size, ounce for ounce, it can match the fight of bass.

When I was a youngster we traveled from California to Wisconsin to visit our grand parents and my grandpa took me out in a little row boat on a large, tree-sheltered Lilly-padded pond. It was my first time fishing. He set me up with a cork bobber and a worm on a hook and we both fished for sunfish. In a short time we caught a bucket full of fish. It was a glorious experience.

Sunfish Trapnest Poultry House Feather Clothes

Years later I lived in a one room cabin in Elmira, Oregon which was adjacent to a pond stocked with Bluegill and small mouth bass. I taught myself to use a fly rod with a floating popping cork. Any time I wanted I would roll cast out along the edges of logs and pads and twitch that cork until big Bluegills would bite. I never caught more than I could eat, and never once was I skunked. Try though I may I have never had such a string of fishing experiences or such a grand locale. LRM


Sunfish Trapnest Poultry House Feather Clothes

Sunfish Trapnest Poultry House Feather Clothes

Sunfish Trapnest Poultry House Feather Clothes

Feathers as Clothing

The overlapping of the feathers on a hen’s back and breast is a pretty illustration of nature’s method of shingling, so that the rain, finding no place to enter, drips off, leaving the bird’s underclothing quite dry. It is interesting to note how a hen behaves in the rain; she drops her tail and holds herself so that the water finds upon her no resting place, but simply a steep surface down which to flow to the ground.

Each feather consists of three parts, the shaft or quill, which is the central stiff stem of the feather, giving it strength. From this quill come off the barbs which, toward the outer end, join together in a smooth web, making the thin fan-like portion of the feather; at the base is the fluff, which is soft and downy and near to the body of the fowl…

The feathers on the back of a hen are longer and narrower in proportion than those on the breast and are especially fitted to protect the back from rain…

Down is a feather with no quill; young chickens are covered with down.

(from Handbook of Nature-Study for Teachers and Parents by Anna Botsford Comstock, self-published, copyright 1929)