Oranges

Even More Promising New Fruits

Even More Promising New Fruits

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For many years there has been a strong tendency in the American fruit trade to urge that fruit growers reduce the number of varieties in their commercial plantations. When commercial fruit growing was developing out of the old-time family orchard, with its succession of varieties ripening throughout the season, such advice was undoubtedly good for the average individual planter, but there appears good ground for the belief that a point has been reached in several of our orchard fruits where a wider range of season and quality would result in a steadier net income from the fruit crop, and therefore in a sounder business condition in the fruit industry in many sections.

New Citrus Creations 1904

New Citrus Creations 1904

The citrus industry in Florida has frequently suffered from severe freezes. The most disastrous of these probably were the freezes of 1835, 1886, and 1894- 95, which killed or seriously injured almost every tree in the State. Other minor freezes have occurred from time to time, which, while not so severe, have seriously damaged many orange groves. In California and Arizona, also, citrus trees are frequently injured by severe cold. It is thus clear that the most desirable improvement in the orange and other citrus fruits is the securing of varieties which can endure lower degrees of temperature and which may be grown throughout the present orange-producing sections without danger of injury by cold.

Oranges

Oranges

The Orange is one of the oldest of cultivated fruits. Its nativity is still in doubt, but it is probable that it is indigenous to the Indo-Chinese region. It is now widely distributed in all warm-temperate and tropical countries, in many of which it has run wild and behaves like a native plant. In parts of Florida the Orange was found wild when permanent settlements were made, but it had probably spread from stock that was introduced by the early Spaniards.