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The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson

The true ‘Jackson Fork’, as illustrated below, is arguably the single most iconic product invented by Byron Jackson, of early 1900’s San Francisco – but it was by no means the only important innovation/product Jackson engineered. As these old cuts testify, he designed many devices and systems for forage handling. Some, like the Threshing Outfits, were geared for handling large volumes of grain crop. SFJ

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Jackson’s Light-Weight Horse Fork

Jackson’s “Light-Weight” Forks

“Nothing succeeds like success.” When the Jackson Light-Weight Horse Fork was introduced, it immediately superseded the heavy and clumsy implements previously in use, so that the manufacturers found it impossible to sell them at any price.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Fig. 301 – Jackson’s Low Derrick Threshing Outfit

Jackson’s Low Derrick Threshing Outfit

The above outfit, and the one varying but slightly from it, are now used with nearly all steam threshers on the Pacific Coast and no description is considered necessary.

The above is known as Jackson’s Low Derrick Threshing Outfit, and comprises Jackson’s self feeder, elevator, spreader, derrick, fork hoist, light-weight forks and iron pulley blocks.

This combination is used to pass headed grain from the stack to the cylinder of the thresher.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Jackson’s No. 8 Self Feeder
The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Jackson’s No. 9 Self Feeder
The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Fig. 302 – Jackson’s High Derrick Threshing Outfit

Jackson’s High Derrick Outfit

The above illustrates Jackson’s High Derrick Threshing Outfit, comprising self feeder, short elevator, spreader, derrick, fork hoist, light-weight forks and iron pulley blocks. The purpose of this combination is to convey headed grain from stack to thresher.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Jackson’s Expansion-Clutch Fork Hoist

Jackson’s Expansion-Clutch Fork Hoist

The Fork Hoist is bolted to the rear end of the Derrick, as shown in figures 301 and 302, and lifts the forks by power transmitted to it through the long rope running from the engine. One man operates it, whether two or three forks are used, saving the labor of one man and two spans of horses, required when the Hoist is not used.

There is no surplus rope to be dragged back and forth on the ground, and the rope which is used will uncoil freely from the drum, offering no resistance to the fork being pulled back to the forkman, and set for another load. This is of great importance; as it lightens the labor of the forkman, so that any laborer can run a Jackson Light-Weight Fork.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Jackson’s Friction Drum Fork Hoist

Jackson’s Friction Drum Fork Hoist

This Hoist is somewhat similar to the one above it with the exception that this is constructed with a friction drum. Some prefer the Expansion Clutch Hoist, while others like the friction drum the best. The description on the Expansion Clutch Hoist will apply to the Friction Drum Hoist also.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson

Wire Rope – Wire rope should be used to hoist the forks when a Fork Hoist is used. 3/8-inch diameter wire rope is amply strong, and the quality recommended by wire rope manufacturers is known as iron hoisting rope, nineteen wires to the strand. The length most generally used is 100 feet. In using wire rope it is desirable to lag the hoist drums with old Manila rope, increasing their diameter; the larger the diameter of drum, the longer the rope will last. They would be made larger if every one used wire rope. Care should be taken to wind rope on the drums true, and not to “kink” it. It is desirable to use a little linseed oil on it.

Drive Rope from Engine to Hoist – Use ¾-inch diameter Manila rope. The length, which is generally about 60 feet longer than that of engine belt, should be given in ordering. This rope will be furnished at the market rate.

We recommend the rope be spliced and dipped in a compound of resin and oil.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Jackson’s “Eclipse” Hay Stacker and Loader

Jackson’s “Eclipse” Hay Stacker and Loader

This is the standard stacker, and is an improvement on all others, as it is lighter, stronger, and dumps the hay at any desired height, instead of carrying it all up over itself, without regard to height of stack. This latter point is quite important in stacking in windy weather, as with the “Eclipse” the hay is only raised as high as necessary to dump it on the stack, and is not scattered by the wind. The uprights of the “Eclipse” are made 28 feet high, as this is as long as ‘they can be shipped, and with them it will stack nearly or quite that height, but the height it may be made to stack is really unlimited, as these uprights may be spliced out as high as desired, and guyed with rope.

This machine is made under the “Acme” and “Oliver” patents. It is mounted on cast iron wheels, and will build a stack 25 feet high.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson

With the rakes the hay is taken from the swath, when cured, just as left by the mower, or from the cock or windrow. If it is desired to rake it before it is cured sufficiently to stack: and when the Rake is loaded it is driven to the Stacker, the rake-teeth entering between the pitcher teeth: the hay is pressed forward against the pitcher-head, the horses then back the Rake off, leaving the hay in a compact mass upon the pitcher, and return to the field for another load. As soon as the Rake is out of the way, the horse attached to the pitcher rope is started, elevating the load the desired height, when the latch-rope is pulled, and the hay is dropped in the center of the stack, the horse is backed up, the pitcher being brought back to the ground by its own weight, ready for another load.

The “Eclipse” has special advantages for stacking in windy weather, and for loading hay etc., on wagons. It dumps the load at any desired height, from 5 to 25 feet, while it is easily moved and quickly set.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
Jackson’s “Acme” Rake and Buck Combined

Jackson’s “Acme” Rake and Buck Combined

This rake does the work of all other rakes, wire rakes, sulky rakes, revolving rakes, buck rakes and “go-devils.” No other rake need be used, or can be used, with advantage in making hay. It rakes from the swath and leaves the hay in large bunches at once, requiring no hard work. It is designed to rake the hay into large bunches direct from the mower, and to take up these bunches and carry them to the stacker, after they are sufficiently cured. It has no equal for making large bunches, and there is no necessity for windrowing the hay, as the rake will take it direct from the swath, as left by the mower, thus saving all the labor of windrowing and cocking.

To bunch the hay, the rake is driven until a full load is obtained when it describes a quarter turn, backs from under the load, and, turning back into the swath, resumes raking. This leaves the bunches about twelve feet, or the width of the rake, apart; and as the hay, when taken from the swath, is pushed on the rake in the same shape that it lay in the swath, it is in nice shape for drying (requiring little or no dressing by hand) and for being taken up again to go to the stacker.

One man and two horses will keep up with two mowers, following the mower as soon as the hay is wilted enough to be raked clean with any rake. It rakes cleaner. The hay will cure quicker without bleaching by dew or sun. Very large bunches can be made by pushing from two to six rakefuls into one.

If raked and bunched by the improved “Acme” Rake, the hay is in very much better shape to reload and deliver on the Stacker evenly and level (loading the rakes all they will carry to the stack), and spreads well over the stack, saving labor in stacking, because it has not been tangled as it is when gathered with the sulky or revolving rake. Bear in mind that windrowing hay with any rake is labor thrown away, and is detrimental to the neat and most economical working of the “Acme” Hay Harvesting Machinery.

The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson
The Engineering Magic of Byron Jackson