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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PST

The Milk and Human Kindness Part 1

The Milk and Human Kindness

Part 1

by Suzanne Lupien of Scio, OR

Starting in with a dairy cow is a life changing event like getting married and having children all at once. After all the research, the soul searching and the careful preparation — good fences, sturdy, sunny cow house, good pasturage, quality hay in the loft, helpful old-timer down the road, you begin…

Accepting and adapting to the daily milk chore, tending your beloved cow day in, day out, watching closely, caring intelligently, keeping the cow house clean, the cow clean, the water clean, the manger clean, the milk dishes clean, clean, clean, the milk clean. The milk! What a revelation this rich milk is! How your daily devotional is coming right back to you in this heavenly milk! Your life, your world, may well revolve around your cow, as well it might; she is devoting her entire life to you, so generously, so richly, so willingly. How right it is to return it to her in kind.

In the beginning the milking itself — a skill that needs time, patience and muscle — seems like the biggest part of the story. And little by little it becomes easier, taking its place in your everyday, like sweeping the kitchen floor, and the other aspects of this union call on your heart, mind, conscience and strength. Now it becomes understood what an enormous commitment this dairying requires, and in order for it to sustain, and be sustained, one must know so many things, and be able to handle the entire job with good cheer and discipline, and the milk — using this magnificent milk. Keeping a dairy cow is at once an incredible luxury and a serious responsibility.

For your sake as well as hers, I’m hoping that your routine has been established, both you and your cow are happy and healthy. You meet her needs lovingly and generously so that she may do the same for you. Milking times and feeding times are occurring like clockwork, her comfort is always first and foremost in your mind, and is energetically manifest in your daily husbandry.

The Milk and Human Kindness Part 1

Fall and winter are my favorite times for an abundance of milk. The busy summer of haying and gardening are over. I couldn’t possibly make hay and cheese at the same time. So I prefer my cows to freshen late summer so by the time the calf is big and strong, 10-12 weeks, I can cut back on his or her access to the milk supply, begin the process of eventual separation and start my year of cheese-making. Over several years time I have learned a lot about making very high quality cheese on a small scale, ways to be sensible about precious time, ways to save money on equipment, ways to age cheese and ways to share it. Really, there is no finer milk than that from a well tended home cow, and that fact alone will have a major effect on the quality of your end product, whether it is butter, yogurt, clotted cream or cheddar. And knowing that the high quality springs from good basic farming has done a great deal to teach me the depth and meaning of goodness. It is solid, it is fair, and it is life- giving. And it is so meaningful.

I know what it’s like to be trying to find one’s way learning skills without a much needed teacher or experienced advisor. I made a lot of cheese for the pigs and chickens in the beginning and shed many a tear. I want you to know that the skills you will need are within your reach, and that I will spell it all out for you as best I can, through subsequent articles in this journal so you can learn what to do, how to do, why to do, when to do, and sometimes what to do if?? I’m offering to help with step by step instructions that are descriptive and complete. It is essential that these skills are given into your willing hands, and I promise not to hold back — you need to have it all. Perhaps it will take a few years to cover the range of possibilities, and the basic requirements, something I very much look forward to.

I realized early on that milk quality is governed by cow health, and sanitary milk handling in equal measure. The key to vital, clean, beautiful milk is skillful devotion to your cow. It’s not a question of killing bacteria, it’s a question of knowing and caring and doing. There cannot be any comparison between milk from the horror of industrial dairying and a good one or two cow grass based dairy. And such enjoyable and interesting work it is.

Mucking out the cow house, feeding out hay, milking and making cheese all go perfectly together. Contrasting tasks all headed for the aim of honorable contribution in one’s family and to one’s community.

I made a reference to how precious time can be on a small farm and I will show you what I know about selecting cheeses to make that take up a relatively short amount of time — simple farmer’s cheeses which fit nicely in a farmer’s day. We’ll cover everything from what to feed your cow to contriving a cave very simply and cheaply in addition to equipment, milk handling, homemade starter cultures and a wide variety of cultured milk products.

In the next issue I will cover sanitation, homemade starter cultures, yogurt making and a simple French farmer cheese. I hope it’s the next best thing to welcoming you personally at my kitchen door and actually getting to work together.

Spotlight On: Crops & Soil

Raised Bed Gardening

Raised Bed Gardening

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from issue:

Raised beds may not be right for everyone, and our way is not the only way. I have seen raised beds made from rows of 5’ diameter kiddy pools, and heard of a fellow who collected junk refrigerators from the dump and lined them up on their backs into a rainbow of colored enameled steel raised beds. Even rows of five-gallon pails filled with plants count as raised beds in my estimation. Do it any way you care to, but do it if it’s right for you.

Winter Production of Fresh Vegetables

Winter Production of Fresh Vegetables

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Any claim about winter production of fresh vegetables, with minimal or no heating or heat storage systems, seems highly improbable. The weather is too cold and the days are too short. Low winter temperatures, however, are not an insurmountable barrier. Nor is winter day-length the barrier it may appear to be. In fact most of the continental US has far more winter sunshine than parts of the world where, due to milder temperatures, fresh winter vegetable production has a long tradition.

Cabbage

Cabbage

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from issue:

Cabbage is the most important vegetable commercially of the cole crops, which include cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, kohlrabi, collard, broccoli, and many others. It also ranks as one of the most important of all vegetable crops and is universally cultivated as a garden, truck and general farm crop. The market for cabbage, like that for potatoes, is continuous throughout the year, and this tends to make it one of the staple vegetables.

Soil, Vegetation, and Acidity

From Dusty Shelves: Audels Gardeners and Growers Guide teaches us about soil acidity.

Carrots and Beets The Roots of Our Garden

Carrots & Beets – The Roots of Our Garden

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from issue:

Carrots and beets are some of the vegetables that are easy to kill with kindness. They’re little gluttons for space and nutrients, and must be handled with an iron fist to make them grow straight and strong. Give the buggers no slack at all! Your motto should be – “If in doubt, yank it out!” I pinch out a finger full (maybe 3/4” wide) and skip a finger width. Pinch and skip, pinch and skip, working with existing gaps and rooting out particularly thick clumps.

Making Sorghum Molasses

Making Sorghum Molasses

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from issue:

Growing sorghum doesn’t take much work, according to Buhrman. You plant it in the spring, work it a couple of times and that’s about all that’s required until late in the growing season. That is when the work begins. Before it is cut, all the stalks have to be “bladed” – the leaves removed from the stalks. It’s then cut, then the tassles are cut off, and the stalks are fed through a crusher. The crusher forces the juices out of the plant. The sorghum juice is then boiled in a vat for four to five hours until nothing is left but the syrup.

Beating the Beetles – War & Peace in a Houston Garden

Blooming that is, unless the cucumber beetles arrive first.
And arrive they have … “At first I thought they looked like big, yellow lady bugs.” Paul said, “Then I looked…

Ginseng Culture

Ginseng Culture

U.S. Department of Agriculture Farmer’s Bulletin No. 1184 Issued 1921, Revised 1941 — The evident preference of the Chinese for the wild root and the unsatisfactory state of the general market for cultivated ginseng have caused grave doubts as to the future prospects of the industry. These doubts will probably be realized unless growers should strive for quality of product and not for quantity of production, as has been the all too common practice in the past.

Walki Biodegradable Mulching Paper

New Biodegradable Mulching Paper

Views of any and all modern farming stir questions for me. The most common wonder for me has been ‘how come we haven’t come up with a something to replace plastic?’ It’s used for cold frames, hotbeds, greenhouses, silage and haylage bagging and it is used for mulch. That’s why when I read of this new Swedish innovation in specialized paper mulching I got the itch to scratch and learn more. What follows is what we know. We’d like to know more. LRM

Syrup From Oregons Big-Leaf Maple

Syrup From Oregon’s Big Leaf Maple

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There is a great potential in establishment of a seasonal “sugarbush” industry for small farmers of the northwestern states, particularly western Oregon and Washington. Five syrup producing species of maples are found mainly east of the Rocky Mountains. The Box Elder and the Big-leaf Maple are the only syrup producing maples of the Pacific Northwest. Properly made syrup from these two western maples is indistinguishable from the syrup of maples of the midwestern and northeastern states.

Farm Manure

Farm Manure

Naturally there is great variation in manure according to the animals it is made by, the feeding and bedding material, and the manner in which it is kept. Different analyses naturally shows different results and the tables here given serve only as a guide or index to the various kinds. The manure heap, by the way, is no place for old tin cans, bottles, glass, and other similar waste material.

Mullein Indigenous Friend to All

Mullein: Indigenous Friend to All

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Mullein is a hardy native, soft and sturdy requiring no extra effort to thrive on your part. Whether you care to make your own medicines or not, consider mullein’s value to bees, bumblebees, butterflies, moths, dragonflies, who are needing nectar and nourishment that is toxin free and safe to consume. In this case, all you have to do is… nothing. What could be simpler?

Starting Seeds

From Dusty Shelves: A WWII era article from Farming For Security

Low Tillage Radish Onions

Low Tillage Radish Onions

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The radishes came up quick, filling the garden canopy completely that fall, and the following spring we found the plot was clean of weeds and rows of open holes were left where the radish roots had been growing. Well, we had a few extra onion plants that spring and decided to plant them in these holes, since we already had very clear lines laid out for us and a clean seedbed. What we got were the best looking onions that have ever come out of our gardens.

Planting Calendar and Other Diagrams

From Dusty Shelves: A 1943 calendar for seeding your vegetable garden.

Cultivating Questions

Cultivating Questions: Concerning the Bioextensive Market Garden

One of our goals when we first started farming here was to develop the farm as a self-contained nutrient system. Unlike the almost complete recycling of nutrients which can take place on a livestock operation, we are always amazed – even a little disturbed – to see how many tons of fertility and organic matter leave the market garden each year with so little returned to the good earth.

Bamboo A Multipurpose Agroforestry Crop

Bamboo: A Multipurpose Agroforestry Crop

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The bamboos are gaining increased attention as an alternative crop with multiple uses and benefits: 1) domestic use around the farm (e.g., vegetable stakes, trellis poles, shade laths); 2) commercial production for use in construction, food, and the arts (e.g., concrete reinforcement, fishing poles, furniture, crafts, edible bamboo shoots, musical instruments); and 3) ornamental, landscape, and conservation uses (e.g., specimen plants, screens, hedges, riparian buffer zone).

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT