Small Farmer's Journal

Facebook  YouTube

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

The Milk and Human Kindness Part 1

The Milk and Human Kindness

Part 1

by Suzanne Lupien of Scio, OR

Starting in with a dairy cow is a life changing event like getting married and having children all at once. After all the research, the soul searching and the careful preparation — good fences, sturdy, sunny cow house, good pasturage, quality hay in the loft, helpful old-timer down the road, you begin…

Accepting and adapting to the daily milk chore, tending your beloved cow day in, day out, watching closely, caring intelligently, keeping the cow house clean, the cow clean, the water clean, the manger clean, the milk dishes clean, clean, clean, the milk clean. The milk! What a revelation this rich milk is! How your daily devotional is coming right back to you in this heavenly milk! Your life, your world, may well revolve around your cow, as well it might; she is devoting her entire life to you, so generously, so richly, so willingly. How right it is to return it to her in kind.

In the beginning the milking itself — a skill that needs time, patience and muscle — seems like the biggest part of the story. And little by little it becomes easier, taking its place in your everyday, like sweeping the kitchen floor, and the other aspects of this union call on your heart, mind, conscience and strength. Now it becomes understood what an enormous commitment this dairying requires, and in order for it to sustain, and be sustained, one must know so many things, and be able to handle the entire job with good cheer and discipline, and the milk — using this magnificent milk. Keeping a dairy cow is at once an incredible luxury and a serious responsibility.

For your sake as well as hers, I’m hoping that your routine has been established, both you and your cow are happy and healthy. You meet her needs lovingly and generously so that she may do the same for you. Milking times and feeding times are occurring like clockwork, her comfort is always first and foremost in your mind, and is energetically manifest in your daily husbandry.

The Milk and Human Kindness Part 1

Fall and winter are my favorite times for an abundance of milk. The busy summer of haying and gardening are over. I couldn’t possibly make hay and cheese at the same time. So I prefer my cows to freshen late summer so by the time the calf is big and strong, 10-12 weeks, I can cut back on his or her access to the milk supply, begin the process of eventual separation and start my year of cheese-making. Over several years time I have learned a lot about making very high quality cheese on a small scale, ways to be sensible about precious time, ways to save money on equipment, ways to age cheese and ways to share it. Really, there is no finer milk than that from a well tended home cow, and that fact alone will have a major effect on the quality of your end product, whether it is butter, yogurt, clotted cream or cheddar. And knowing that the high quality springs from good basic farming has done a great deal to teach me the depth and meaning of goodness. It is solid, it is fair, and it is life- giving. And it is so meaningful.

I know what it’s like to be trying to find one’s way learning skills without a much needed teacher or experienced advisor. I made a lot of cheese for the pigs and chickens in the beginning and shed many a tear. I want you to know that the skills you will need are within your reach, and that I will spell it all out for you as best I can, through subsequent articles in this journal so you can learn what to do, how to do, why to do, when to do, and sometimes what to do if?? I’m offering to help with step by step instructions that are descriptive and complete. It is essential that these skills are given into your willing hands, and I promise not to hold back — you need to have it all. Perhaps it will take a few years to cover the range of possibilities, and the basic requirements, something I very much look forward to.

I realized early on that milk quality is governed by cow health, and sanitary milk handling in equal measure. The key to vital, clean, beautiful milk is skillful devotion to your cow. It’s not a question of killing bacteria, it’s a question of knowing and caring and doing. There cannot be any comparison between milk from the horror of industrial dairying and a good one or two cow grass based dairy. And such enjoyable and interesting work it is.

Mucking out the cow house, feeding out hay, milking and making cheese all go perfectly together. Contrasting tasks all headed for the aim of honorable contribution in one’s family and to one’s community.

I made a reference to how precious time can be on a small farm and I will show you what I know about selecting cheeses to make that take up a relatively short amount of time — simple farmer’s cheeses which fit nicely in a farmer’s day. We’ll cover everything from what to feed your cow to contriving a cave very simply and cheaply in addition to equipment, milk handling, homemade starter cultures and a wide variety of cultured milk products.

In the next issue I will cover sanitation, homemade starter cultures, yogurt making and a simple French farmer cheese. I hope it’s the next best thing to welcoming you personally at my kitchen door and actually getting to work together.

Spotlight On: Farming Systems & Approaches

A Tour of Various Draft Farms

A Tour of Various Draft Farms

Amidst all of the possibility that is out there, all of the options and uncertainties, it helps to remember that there is also a strong community in the draft-farming world. There are a great many like-minded yet still diverse people working with draft horses and ready to share their experiences. What will serve us well within this great variety of farms and farmers is to keep in touch, to learn from one another’s good ideas and mistakes and to keep on farming with draft power.

Useful Birds

Useful Birds

by:
from issue:

Whether a bird is beneficial or injurious depends almost entirely upon what it eats. Birds are often accused of eating this or that product of cultivation, when an examination of the stomachs shows the accusation to be unfounded. Accordingly, the Biological Survey has conducted for some years past a systematic investigation of the food of those species which are most common about the farm and garden.

Food Energy The Fragile Link Between Resources and Population

Food-Energy: the Fragile Link Between Resources & Population

by:
from issue:

Now, after a one lifetime span of almost free energy and resultant copious food, the entire world faces the imminent decline (and eventual demise) of finite, fossil-fuel capital. Without fossil fuels, food can no longer be produced in one area and shipped thousands of miles to market. To suggest that the world will be able to feed the UN projected population of nine billion by 2050 is totally incomprehensible in the face of declining oil.

Starting Your Farm

Starting Your Farm: Chapter 2

How do you learn the true status of that farm with the “for sale” sign? Here are some important pieces of information for you to learn about a given selling farm. The answers will most probably tell you how serious the seller is.

How To Get Into Farming With No Money

How To Get Into Farming With No Money

by:
from issue:

Let’s assume the beginning ‘farmer’ has absolutely nothing. Nothing but a will to farm and a reasonably normal body. The very first thing you must do is search out a farmer, preferably a farmer who farms close to the way that you want to farm. You must watch him, ask questions, do as you are told and learn everything you can. Very shortly you will be on your own and you will find that the more you learn now, the better you will be when you have only yourself to rely on.

English Sheaf Knots

English Sheaf Knots

Long ago when grain was handled mostly by hand, the crop was cut slightly green so seed did not shatter or shake loose too easily. That crop was then gathered into ‘bundles’ or ‘sheafs’ and tied sometimes using a handful of the same grain for the cording. These sheafs were then gathered together, heads up, and leaned upon one another to form drying shocks inviting warm breezes to pass through. In old England, the field workers took great pride in their work and distinctive sheaf knots were designed and employed.

Russian Dacha Gardening

Russian Dacha Gardens

by:
from issue:

Russian household agriculture – dacha gardening – is likely the most extensive system of successful food production of any industrialized nation. This shows that highly decentralized, small-scale food production is not only possible, but practical on a national scale and in a geographically large and diverse country with a challenging climate for growing. Most of the USA has far more than the 110 days average growing season that Russia has.

Cultivating Questions Winterkilled Cover Crops for a Mild Climate Part 2

Cultivating Questions: Winterkilled Cover Crops For A Mild Climate Part 2

Finding just the right cover crop-tillage combination for crops planted the last half of June has always been a real challenge in our location. While surface-tilling mature rye and vetch in May works well for fall crops established in July and August, this cover crop-tillage combo does not allow enough time for decomposition and moisture accumulation for end-of-June plantings.

Farm To School Programs Take Root

All aim to re-connect school kids with healthy local food.

Cultivating Questions Cultivator Setups and Deer Fencing

Cultivating Questions: Cultivator Set-ups and Deer Fencing

We know all too well the frustration of putting your heart and soul into a crop only to have the wildlife consume it before you can get it harvested let alone to market. Our farm sits next to several thousand acres of state game lands and is the only produce operation in the area. As you can imagine, deer pressure can be intense. Neighbors have counted herds of 20 or more in our pastures.

New York Organic Grazing Dairy

New York Organic Grazing Dairy

by:
from issue:

Our farm, here in the center of New York State, consists of 101 acres, about 90 in grass, the rest some woods and swamp. It is inhabited by forty-six jersey cows, twelve breeding ace heifers, one bull, and because it is calving season — an increasing number of calves. Also, four Belgian mares and a couple of buggy horses. Last, and possibly least — the farmer, farmer’s wife, and five grown children.

Portrait of a Garden

Portrait of a Garden

As the seasons slip by at a centuries-old Dutch estate, an 85-year-old pruning master and the owner work on cultivating crops in the kitchen garden. To do this successfully requires a degree of obsessiveness, the old man explains in this calm, observational documentary. The pruning master still works every day. It would be easier if he were only 60 and young.

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

Horsedrawn No-Till Garlic

We were inspired to try no-tilling vegetables into cover crops after attending the Groffs’ field day in 1996. No-tilling warm season vegetables has proved problematic at our site due to the mulch of cover crop residues keeping the soil too cool and attracting slugs. We thought that no-tilling garlic into this cover crop of oats and Canadian field peas might be the ticket as garlic seems to appreciate being mulched.

Cultivating Questions A Diversity of Cropping Systems

Cultivating Questions: A Diversity of Cropping Systems

As a matter of convenience, we plant all of our field vegetables in widely spaced single rows so we can cultivate the crops with one setup on the riding cultivator. Row cropping makes sense for us because we are more limited by labor than land and we don’t use irrigation for the field vegetables. As for the economics of planting produce in work horse friendly single rows, revenue is comparable to many multiple row tractor systems.

The First Year

The First Year

by:
from issue:

Prior to last year, I had felt I knew the nuances of the land quite well and fancied myself as knowledgeable about the course of the natural world. Outdoors was where I felt the most comfortable. The fresh air and endless views of fields, hills and valleys renewed my spirit and refreshed my mind. I didn’t think there was much that could fluster me when it came to the land. Until I became an organic farmer.

Starting Your Farm

Starting Your Farm: Chapter 4

Assuming that you’ve found a farm you want to buy, next you’ll need to determine if you can buy it. If you have sold your property, and/or saved your money, and have the means to buy the farm you are sitting pretty. If you do not have the full price of a considered farm, in cash or any other form, you will likely have to look for financing.

Cuban Agriculture

Cuban Agriculture

by:
from issue:

In December of 1979, Mary Jo and I spent two weeks traveling in Cuba on a “Farmer’s Tour of Cuba”. The tour was a first of its kind. It was organized in the U.S. by farmers, was made up of U.S. farmers and agriculturally oriented folks, and was sponsored in Cuba by A.N.A.P., the National Association of Independent Farmers. As we learned about farming we also learned how the individuals, farms, and communities we visited fit into the greater social and economic structure of Cuba.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT