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Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT

Starting Your Farm

The Small Farmer’s Journal has decided to run editor and publisher Lynn R. Miller’s book Starting Your Farm as a serial series. Below is Chapter 3.

Chapter 3

“Men stumble over the truth from time to time but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.” – Winston Churchill

Measuring and Researching

In the last two chapters we discussed “Who wants to farm” and “The cost of farm acreage.” In this chapter we will discuss finding and learning about your future farm property.

WHERE TO LOOK FOR FARMS FOR SALE

After you have decided upon an area or region the all too simple way to proceed is to read real estate advertising and talk with local real estate agencies. It is my personal experience that to limit your search to listed advertised properties is a mistake. Especially if you have made a firm decision on just where you want to settle. Often people new to this process will make the mistake of going to one real estate office, describing their needs and accepting whatever agency offers, by way of information, as a complete view of just what is available. My wife and I knew we wanted to settle exactly where we are and asked local real estate agencies for help in locating available properties. We were laughed at and sent away time and time again. We were told there was no such property available- period. We almost gave up when an out of town realtor returned our call and suggested we come by and pick up a map to a remote, barely accessible, ranch property EXACTLY in the area we wanted. He said it wasn’t listed YET but thought it would come available soon. With is help we made an offer the very day it was listed and the rest is history.

Besides checking the ads and listings, drive the back roads, meet and talk with local folks, and visit the county seat and ask about acreage that night come up for auction sale because of unpaid back taxes. You are looking for people who MIGHT be selling soon, who are selling PRIVATELY without a real estate listing, who may be holding on to an abandoned farm property with the idea that no one would be interested in it, or who tried for a long time to sell and have tired or given up on the process. You need to leave your name and address with local banks and lending institutions with the information that you are looking to buy. You need to post little ads of your own stating what you are looking for. You need to snoop around.

You might find a farm or farms which are listed with real estate agencies. You might find farms which are for sale by private individuals who prefer not to deal with real estate agents.

You might find abandoned properties which belong to absentee owners including banks or holding companies who would be willing to sell or trade. Etc, etc… And each may require a different approach.

You may in your inquiries find realtors who have no listings that match your needs but who are quick to offer their services to you in finding a property. That is okay, HOWEVER if the realtor should ask of you that you sign a contract designating him or her as your agent I suggest it would NOT be in your best interest to do so.

Once you’ve found a farm you’re interested in, the work really starts. Now it’s time to research it and measure it against your needs and circumstance. Buried in this chapter is a master checklist which will hopefully ease what can be a trying process.

AFTER LOCATING A FARM PROPERTY

WITH A REALTOR

If the farm you’ve found is listed with a real estate agency you might be able to have them assist you in your work. But remember: REALTORS, and Real Estate Agencies, WORK FOR THEMSELVES, not for the buyer, not for the seller. They will almost always push to close a sale as fast as possible whether it’s to you or someone else who happens along. If you end up buying the wrong farm, or the right farm the wrong way, and find yourself in difficulty the realtor will still get his or her commission. Your best interests are not necessarily theirs. The honest, easy-going, intelligent real estate agent is rare. Be on your guard.

So first, let’s proceed as though a realtor were involved:

1) Get a copy of the listing agreement.

2) Ask if a recent title search has been done on the property and, if so, get a copy of the results.

3) Name and address of owner if somehow missing from listing agreement.

WARNING: DO NOT LET A REALTOR TRICK YOU INTO A PREMATURE ‘EARNEST MONEY AGREEMENT’ BY SUGGESTING IT’S THE ONLY WAY THEY CAN RELEASE THE ABOVE LISTED DOCUMENTS. SIGN NOTHING WITHOUT A REVIEW BY A KNOWLEDGEABLE THIRD PARTY (preferably a lawyer).

If a realtor is unwilling to provide the above information, suspect a problem with either property OR realtor OR both. (A good realtor will understand the necessity for this information and will work aggressively to anticipate all the questions you might have so as to be prepared. This is to the realtor’s best interest because it expedites the inquiry process and can speed a sale without undue hassle. If you get lucky you’ll find such a realtor and cut your “investigation” time way down.

NEXT

Assuming you’ve got the documents, look for the answers to these questions:

A) Who actually owns the listed property? What is the asking price? Does the seller require cash in full? Will seller allow a percentage down payment with owner financing? What down payment amount is required? What nature of owner financing (i.e. land sale contract, deed of trust, etc.) is acceptable and sought? Is there an existing mortgage against the property and is it assumable or transferable?

B) What is being bought? Exact acreage? Some paper evidence or any conditions as in guarantees of production levels or statements as to “sold as is” (more on this later). Improvements specified? A complete listing of all items to be included with purchase as well as those not going with property (i.e. portable outbuildings, irrigation equipment, above ground storage tanks, etc.)

C) Is anything currently owed against the property? What manner of contract security is involved? Are there any liens currently held against the property and by whom? Any collateral pledges as guarantor for other transactions? (Later, we’ll talk about STATUS of above.)

D) Any easements recorded? (more later)

E) Any rights withheld? (i.e. mineral or timber rights not transferring or transferrable and easements related to same)

F) Water rights recorded and filed? Age of same (more later)

G) Property taxes? Any in arrears?

H) Relevant districts? School, etc.

I) Any conditions for viewing property and improvements? (i.e. lengthy advance notices and restrictions on subsequent revisits during purchase negotiations.)

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Spotlight On: How-To & Plans

Starting Seeds

From Dusty Shelves: A WWII era article from Farming For Security

Haying With Horses

Hitching Horses To A Mower

When hitching to the mower, first make sure it’s on level ground and out of gear. The cutter bar should be fastened up in the vertical or carrier position. This is for safety of all people in attendance during hitching.

Homemade Ground-Drive PTO Forecart

Homemade Ground-Drive PTO Forecart

by:
from issue:

As we start, consider a few things when building a pto cart. Are big drive tires necessary? Is a lot of weight needed? Imagine the cart in use. Try to see it working where you normally go and where you almost never go. Will it be safe and easy to mount or dismount? Can you access the controls of the implement conveniently? Is it easy to hook and unhook? Where is the balance point? I’m sure you will think of other details as you daydream about it.

Basil Scarberrys Ground-Drive Forecart

Basil Scarberry’s Ground-Drive Forecart

by:
from issue:

I used an ’84 Chevrolet S-10 rear end to build my forecart, turn it over to get right rotation, used master cylinder off buggy and 2” Reese hitch, extend hitch out to use P.T.O. The cart is especially useful for tedding hay. However, its uses are virtually unlimited. We use it for hauling firewood on a trailer, for pulling a disc and peg tooth harrow, for hauling baled hay on an 8’ x 16’ hay wagon, and just for a jaunt about the farm and community.

The Use and Construction of Home Made Implements

The Use and Construction of Home Made Implements

by: ,
from issue:

It is now possible to purchase a make of machine to suit almost any condition if the money is available. There is no doubt that eventually they will be quite generally used. However, the dry farmers are at present hard pressed financially and in many instances the purchase of very much machinery is out of the question. For the man of small means or limited acreage, a homemade implement may be utilized at least temporarily.

Multiple Hitching with One Set of Lines

Multiple Hitching with One Set of Lines

by:
from issue:

A great deal of interest has been shown the last several years in using multiple hitches in horse farming, especially in spring fieldwork. The question often asked is how to keep it simple and easy in driving and assembling the hitch as far as lines are concerned. We demonstrated our method at the Horse Progress Days at Mt. Hope, Ohio in 2003 and have been asked numerous times how we drove four, six and eight-horse hitches using only two lines.

Livestock Guardians

Introducing Your Guard Dog To New Livestock And Other Dogs

When you introduce new animals to an established herd or flock, you should observe your dog’s reactions and behavior for a few days. Since he will be curious anyway, it is a good idea to introduce him to the new animals while he is leashed or to place the new animals in a nearby area.

The Anatomy of Thrift: Harvest Day

On the Anatomy of Thrift Part 2: Harvest Day

On the Anatomy of Thrift is an instructional series Farmrun created with Farmstead Meatsmith. Their principal intention is instruction in the matters of traditional pork processing. In a broader and more honest context, OAT is a deeply philosophical manifesto on the subject of eating animals. Harvest Day is the second in the series, which explores the ‘cheer’ that is prepared on the day of slaughter, and dives deep into the philosophy and psychology of our relationship to animals.

Collar Hames and Harness Fitting

Collars, Hames and Harness Fitting

Farmers who are good horsemen know everything that is presented here: yet even they will welcome this leaflet because it will refresh their memories and make easier their task when they have to show hired men or boys how to adjust equipment properly. Good horsemen know from long experience that sore necks or sore shoulders on work stock are due to ignorance or carelessness of men in charge, and are inexcusable.

Sleds

Sleds

by:
from issue:

The remainder of this section on Agricultural Implements is about homemade equipment for use with draft animals. These implements are all proven and serviceable. They are easily worked by a single animal weighing 1,000 pounds, and probably a good deal less. Sleds rate high on our homestead. They can be pulled over rough terrain. They do well traversing slopes. Being low to the ground, they are very easy to load up.

Soil, Vegetation, and Acidity

From Dusty Shelves: Audels Gardeners and Growers Guide teaches us about soil acidity.

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Cheese

The Milk and Human Kindness: Making Cheese

by:
from issue:

Yogurt making is the perfect introduction into the world of cultured dairy products and cheese-making. You are handling milk properly, becoming proficient at sanitizing pots and utensils, and learning the principles of culturing milk. Doing these things regularly, perfecting your methods, sets you up for cheese-making very well. Cheese-making involves the addition of a few more steps beyond the culturing.

Permanent Corncribs

A short piece on the construction of corncribs.

How To Prune

From Dusty Shelves: Pruning Guide from 1917

English Sheaf Knots

English Sheaf Knots

Long ago when grain was handled mostly by hand, the crop was cut slightly green so seed did not shatter or shake loose too easily. That crop was then gathered into ‘bundles’ or ‘sheafs’ and tied sometimes using a handful of the same grain for the cording. These sheafs were then gathered together, heads up, and leaned upon one another to form drying shocks inviting warm breezes to pass through. In old England, the field workers took great pride in their work and distinctive sheaf knots were designed and employed.

Box Jaw Tongs & the Cow Poop Theory of Blacksmithing

Box Jaw Tongs & the Cow Poop Theory of Blacksmithing

by:
from issue:

Making a pair of tongs was a milestone for a lot of blacksmiths. In times gone past a Journeyman Smith meant just that, a smith that went upon a journey to learn more skills before taking a masters test. When the smith appeared at the door of a prospective employer, he/she would be required to demonstrate their skills. A yard stick for this was to make a pair of tongs.

Horseshoeing Part 3B

Horseshoeing Part 3B

Besides good, tough iron for the shoe, we need an anvil with a round horn and a small hole at one end, a round-headed turning-hammer, a round sledge, a stamping hammer, a pritchel of good steel, and, if a fullered shoe is to be made, a round fuller. Bodily activity and, above all else, a good eye for measurement are not only desirable, but necessary. A shoe should be made thoughtfully, but yet quickly enough to make the most of the heat.

Basic Blacksmithing Techniques

Illustrated guide to basic blacksmithing techniques, an excerpt from Blacksmithing: Basics For The Homestead.

Small Farmer's Journal

Small Farmer's Journal
PO Box 1627
Sisters, Oregon 97759
800-876-2893
541-549-2064
agrarian@smallfarmersjournal.com
Mon - Thu, 8am - 4pm PDT